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The Resource Why gender matters in economics, Mukesh Eswaran

Why gender matters in economics, Mukesh Eswaran

Label
Why gender matters in economics
Title
Why gender matters in economics
Statement of responsibility
Mukesh Eswaran
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"Gender matters in economics--for even with today's technology, fertility choices, market opportunities, and improved social norms, economic outcomes for women remain markedly worse than for men. Drawing on insights from feminism, postmodernism, psychology, evolutionary biology, Marxism, and politics, this textbook provides a rigorous economic look at issues confronting women throughout the world--including nonmarket scenarios, such as marriage, family, fertility choice, and bargaining within households, as well as market areas, like those pertaining to labor and credit markets and globalization.Mukesh Eswaran examines how women's behavioral responses in economic situations and their bargaining power within the household differ from those of men. Eswaran then delves into the far-reaching consequences of these differences, in market and nonmarket domains. The author considers how women may be discriminated against in labor and credit markets, how their family and market circumstances interact, and how globalization has influenced their lives. Eswaran also investigates how women have been empowered through access to education, credit, healthcare, and birth control; changes in ownership laws; the acquisition of suffrage; and political representation. Throughout, Eswaran applies sound economic analysis and new modeling approaches, and each chapter concludes with exercises and discussion questions.This textbook gives readers the necessary tools for thinking about gender from an economic perspective. Addresses economic issues for women throughout the world, in both developed and developing countries Looks at both market and nonmarket domains Requires only a background in basic economic principles Includes the most recent research on the economics of gender in a range of areas Concludes each chapter with exercises and discussion questions "--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Eswaran, Mukesh
Dewey number
305.4
Index
index present
LC call number
HQ1381
LC item number
.E89 2014
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Women
  • Women
  • Women
  • Women in development
  • BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economics / General
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Women's Studies
  • Women
  • Women
  • Women in development
  • Women
Label
Why gender matters in economics, Mukesh Eswaran
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes index
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Ch. 1: Introduction -- Module One: Fundamental matters -- Ch. 2: Do women and men behave differently in economic situations? -- I. Introduction -- II. Do women behave more altruistically than men? -- III. Are women less competitive than men? -- IV. Are women more averse to risk than men? -- V. A cautionary note on observer bias -- VI. Nature versus nurture in gender: evolutionary, feminist, and postmodern views -- VII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussions -- Ch.3: What determines the balance of power in a household? -- I. Introduction -- II. The unitary model -- III. The Nash bargaining model -- IV. Determinants of threat utility -- V. Noncooperative bargaining -- VI. Evidence for bargaining models -- VII. Origins of patriarchy -- VIII. Culture and the perpetuation of patriarchy -- IX. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Module Two: Gender in markets -- Ch. 4: Are women discriminated against in the labor market? -- I. Introduction -- II. A taste for discrimination -- III. Statistical discrimination -- IV. The efficiency wage theory of discrimination -- V. Why women are held to higher standards than men in some jobs -- VI. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 5: How do credit markets affect the well-being of women? -- I. Introduction -- II. The gendered distribution of wealth -- III. Why asset ownership matters: a Marxian model -- IV. The role of wealth in credit markets -- V. Implications for entrepreneurship -- VI. How credit markets put women entrepreneurs at a disadvantage -- VII. Is there gender discrimination in credit markets? -- VIII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 6: What are the effects of globalization on women? -- I. Introduction -- II. Advantages of globalization -- III. Effects of international trade and foreign direct investment on women -- IV. Globalization and investment in human capital: lessons from India -- V. Globalization and patriarchy -- VI. A downside of globalization: increased trafficking of women -- VII. Are women more protectionist than men? -- VIII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Module Three: Marriage and fertility -- Ch. 7: How do women fare in the institution of marriage? -- I. Introduction -- II. Social and private benefits of marriage -- III. Two theories of marriage: economic and evolutionary -- IV. Why monogamy? -- V. Dowries -- VI. The human capital and labor market consequences of marriage -- VII. Spousal violence -- VIII. Divorce and its economic effects on women -- IX. Summary; Appendix: the concept of present value; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 8: Why are women the causes and the victims of fertility decline? -- I. Introduction -- II. Fertility choice in rich countries -- III. Fertility choice in poor countries -- IV. Economic development and fertility -- V. The demographic transition -- VI. The role of child labor in fertility decline -- VII. The importance of female autonomy in fertility choice -- VIII. Why females are victims of fertility decline -- IX. "Missing women" -- X. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 9: How do women benefit from improved access to birth control? -- I. Introduction -- II. Access to birth control and the well-being of women in poor countries -- III. The effects of oral contraceptives on women's careers in rich countries -- IV. Birth control and out-of-wedlock births in rich countries -- V. Birth control and the well-being of women in rich countries -- VI. Unintended consequences of birth control technologies -- VII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Module Four: Empowering women -- Ch. 10: How did women gain suffrage, and what are its economic effects? -- I. Introduction -- II. An economic motivation for women's suffrage -- III. The political means to attain suffrage -- IV. How women gained suffrage -- V. Women and the amout of government spending -- VI. Economic reasons for the political gender gap -- VII. How daughters influence their parents' political views -- VIII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 11: How can women be empowered? -- I. Introduction -- II. Educating women -- III. Giving women access to credit -- IV. Using affirmative action to benefit women -- V. Improving women's political representation -- VI. Increasing family planning and healthcare expenditures -- VII. Reforming inheritance and property laws -- VIII. Does empowerment make women happier -- IX. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion
Control code
1093913
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xii, 392 pages
Isbn
9780691121734
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2014008909
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780691121734
  • (OCoLC)877364290
Label
Why gender matters in economics, Mukesh Eswaran
Publication
Note
Includes index
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Ch. 1: Introduction -- Module One: Fundamental matters -- Ch. 2: Do women and men behave differently in economic situations? -- I. Introduction -- II. Do women behave more altruistically than men? -- III. Are women less competitive than men? -- IV. Are women more averse to risk than men? -- V. A cautionary note on observer bias -- VI. Nature versus nurture in gender: evolutionary, feminist, and postmodern views -- VII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussions -- Ch.3: What determines the balance of power in a household? -- I. Introduction -- II. The unitary model -- III. The Nash bargaining model -- IV. Determinants of threat utility -- V. Noncooperative bargaining -- VI. Evidence for bargaining models -- VII. Origins of patriarchy -- VIII. Culture and the perpetuation of patriarchy -- IX. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Module Two: Gender in markets -- Ch. 4: Are women discriminated against in the labor market? -- I. Introduction -- II. A taste for discrimination -- III. Statistical discrimination -- IV. The efficiency wage theory of discrimination -- V. Why women are held to higher standards than men in some jobs -- VI. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 5: How do credit markets affect the well-being of women? -- I. Introduction -- II. The gendered distribution of wealth -- III. Why asset ownership matters: a Marxian model -- IV. The role of wealth in credit markets -- V. Implications for entrepreneurship -- VI. How credit markets put women entrepreneurs at a disadvantage -- VII. Is there gender discrimination in credit markets? -- VIII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 6: What are the effects of globalization on women? -- I. Introduction -- II. Advantages of globalization -- III. Effects of international trade and foreign direct investment on women -- IV. Globalization and investment in human capital: lessons from India -- V. Globalization and patriarchy -- VI. A downside of globalization: increased trafficking of women -- VII. Are women more protectionist than men? -- VIII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Module Three: Marriage and fertility -- Ch. 7: How do women fare in the institution of marriage? -- I. Introduction -- II. Social and private benefits of marriage -- III. Two theories of marriage: economic and evolutionary -- IV. Why monogamy? -- V. Dowries -- VI. The human capital and labor market consequences of marriage -- VII. Spousal violence -- VIII. Divorce and its economic effects on women -- IX. Summary; Appendix: the concept of present value; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 8: Why are women the causes and the victims of fertility decline? -- I. Introduction -- II. Fertility choice in rich countries -- III. Fertility choice in poor countries -- IV. Economic development and fertility -- V. The demographic transition -- VI. The role of child labor in fertility decline -- VII. The importance of female autonomy in fertility choice -- VIII. Why females are victims of fertility decline -- IX. "Missing women" -- X. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 9: How do women benefit from improved access to birth control? -- I. Introduction -- II. Access to birth control and the well-being of women in poor countries -- III. The effects of oral contraceptives on women's careers in rich countries -- IV. Birth control and out-of-wedlock births in rich countries -- V. Birth control and the well-being of women in rich countries -- VI. Unintended consequences of birth control technologies -- VII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Module Four: Empowering women -- Ch. 10: How did women gain suffrage, and what are its economic effects? -- I. Introduction -- II. An economic motivation for women's suffrage -- III. The political means to attain suffrage -- IV. How women gained suffrage -- V. Women and the amout of government spending -- VI. Economic reasons for the political gender gap -- VII. How daughters influence their parents' political views -- VIII. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion -- Ch. 11: How can women be empowered? -- I. Introduction -- II. Educating women -- III. Giving women access to credit -- IV. Using affirmative action to benefit women -- V. Improving women's political representation -- VI. Increasing family planning and healthcare expenditures -- VII. Reforming inheritance and property laws -- VIII. Does empowerment make women happier -- IX. Summary; Exercises and questions for discussion
Control code
1093913
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xii, 392 pages
Isbn
9780691121734
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2014008909
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780691121734
  • (OCoLC)877364290

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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