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The Resource Who will tell my brother?, Marlene Carvell

Who will tell my brother?, Marlene Carvell

Label
Who will tell my brother?
Title
Who will tell my brother?
Statement of responsibility
Marlene Carvell
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
During his lonely crusade to remove offensive mascots from his high school, a Native American teenager learns more about his heritage, his ancestors, and his place in the world
Award
International Reading Association Children's Book Award for Intermediate Fiction, 2003.
Review
  • Gr. 7-10. A public issue comes close to home in this story of Evan Hill, a part-Mohawk high-school senior, who protests against his school’s use of Indian mascots. Drawing on the real-life experience of her own two sons, Carvell lets Evan tell the story, which unfolds in quiet, spare, very readable, free-verse vignettes that express his hurt, anger, and humiliation as he tries to get the school board, the principal, and his classmates to listen to him and get rid of the noble savage caricature of his people. At times the narrative degenerates into sermonizing, with too much reverential talk about “proud solemnity.” But Evan’s words personalize his search for his Mohawk roots, even as his bullying classmates call him “Injun hippie” and “timber nigger” and then kill his beloved dog. The issues are sure to spark discussion: What about the bystanders who just let it happen? Will Evan change any minds? What’s all the fuss about, anyway? (Reviewed July 1, 2002) -- Hazel Rochman
  • Gr 7 Up –Through lyrical free-verse poems that span his senior year, readers come to know Evan Hill, an artistic, articulate student who embarks on a crusade begun by his older brother to remove the Indian as their high school's mascot. He shares a Native American heritage with his father, who embodies patience and quiet strength and who draws the teen into his once estranged Mohawk family circle. Evan encounters a mix of hostility, indifference, and silent support for his cause from his classmates. Intolerance and brutality erupt when long-haired Evan is cornered in the hall by scissors-wielding classmates and when his mother discovers the beloved family dog lying dead atop a paper feather headdress. The young man's repeated visits to the school board generate annoyance, frustration, and intransigence, and it votes to ignore his request and to uphold the status quo. But at graduation, when an Indian mascot banner is displayed, cheers fade as sympathizers join Evan in a silent, seated protest. Carvell's first novel carries a clear, thought-provoking message about both intolerance and cultural pride. The protagonist's first-person experiences and insights are affecting. His objection to the shallow, stereotypical portrayal of Native Americans emerges from a spiritual and cultural need to be understood, recognized, and appreciated. Through his campaign, Evan learns a lesson in integrity, perseverance, and courage.–Gerry Larson, Durham School of the Arts, NC --Gerry Larson (Reviewed July 1, 2002) (School Library Journal, vol 48, issue 7, p114)
  • Evan is a typical high-school student who chooses an a-typical, unpopular position: to ask the PTA to withdraw his school's Indian mascot. Evan is half Mohawk, and he describes the shame he feels at a school pep rally as cheerleaders whoop with paper feathers on bands around their heads: "I suck in slowly, / breathing in and out, in and out, / with teeth and hands clenched in response, / as my brain teems with confusion / and my eyes search for answers, looking for those who also see the shame / and seeing no one." The narrative—in free verse—conveys the tension and unease that consumes Evan once his petition becomes public. No one will stand behind him, not even when the anonymous hate crimes begin. Finally, just as he is giving up, the friends who have been silent take courage and take a stand. This is well written, though the somber mood never lifts; even the small triumph at the end is subdued. It is a realistically heartening story for teenagers who have a battle to fight, and might also be useful for sparking class discussion. (Fiction. 12-17) (Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2002)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
076696
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Carvell, Marlene
Index
no index present
Intended audience
NP
Intended audience source
Lexile
Interest level
UG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 7
  • 12
Reading level
6.6
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Mohawk Indians
  • Mohawk Indians
  • Indians of North America
  • Toleration
  • Identity
  • High schools
  • Schools
Target audience
adolescent
Label
Who will tell my brother?, Marlene Carvell
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
432831
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
150 pages
Isbn
9780786816576
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2001051759
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780786808274
  • (Sirsi) ADH-0039
Label
Who will tell my brother?, Marlene Carvell
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
432831
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
150 pages
Isbn
9780786816576
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2001051759
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780786808274
  • (Sirsi) ADH-0039

Library Locations

    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
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