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The Resource V is for villain, Peter Moore

V is for villain, Peter Moore

Label
V is for villain
Title
V is for villain
Statement of responsibility
Peter Moore
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Brad Baron and his friends discover dangerous secrets about the superheroes running their society"--
Tone
Character
Award
  • Westchester Fiction Award, 2015.
  • YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, 2015.
Review
  • Grades 8-11 Brad Baron has been living in the shadow of his older brother, Blake, all his life. Blake is bigger, stronger, faster—and he can fly. Somehow, Blake got the superpower genes, and all Brad got was enhanced intelligence. In the superherocentric world of V Is for Villain, brains don’t count for much. “Just because you don’t have powers . . . doesn’t mean that you’re any less of a human being,” says Blake. Who wouldn’t turn villain in the face of that kind of attitude? And when Brad is transferred out of the hero program at his school, he meets other kids like him with “minor” or low-level powers, kids who question the might-equals-right paradigm that exalts superheroes without regard to the consequences of their methods. Maybe the difference between hero and villain is muddier than it seems. Some of the characterizations in this quasi-dystopian novel can be a little heavy-handed, but with plenty of plot twists, dastardly conspiracies, and a snarky narrator, the latest from Moore (Red Moon Rising, 2011) has lots of sparkle. -- Willey, Paula (Reviewed 05-15-2014) (Booklist, vol 110, number 18, p67)
  • /* Starred Review */ In this provocative adventure, Moore (Red Moon Rising) explores the dichotomies of good versus evil and nature versus nurture through the story of a teenage scion of a heroic family who’s forced into a life of rebellion. Because he’s “unpowered,” Brad Baron can never live up to the standards set by his legendary father and brother, but he strives on—until rampant prejudice and casual neglect lead him to make friends with a band of malcontents bent on changing the system through supervillainy. Discovering his latent, illegal power of telepathy, Brad adopts their mission as his own and discovers dark secrets underlying everything he’s ever believed. While Moore’s story stands on its own as a superpowered coming-of-age story, complete with a bad-girl love interest and dramatic scenery-destroying battles, it’s also a subtle criticism of institutionalized privilege—in this case, featuring a society in which flashy physical powers are valued more than less-obvious ones, and normal people are practically faceless bystanders. Come for the fights and tights, stay for the fascinating evolution of a sympathetic villain. Ages 12–up. Agent: Jodi Reamer, Writers House. (May) --Staff (Reviewed March 17, 2014) (Publishers Weekly, vol 261, issue 11, p)
  • Being the nonpowered brother of a superhero could turn any good kid bad. Sixteen-year-old Brad Baron attends Monroe Academy for Powered Teens with the powerful children and siblings of other superheroes. Having no powers makes this a dangerous proposition, especially in Physical Training, a fact made all too clear when Brad is laid up for several weeks with shattered vertebrae. He's moved (involuntarily) to the alternative program, and not only does he make a few friends, but also discovers teachers who aren't jerks or hero-worshippers. However, his big, dumb brother, Blake, aka Artillery of Justice Force, thinks Brad's new friends make him look bad. Blake's attempts at meddling only serve to deepen Brad's anti-hero sentiments. Brad and his friends form an alliance when he finally discovers his own latent telepathy, and they seek out connections in a world where telepathy is illegal. When they make a startling discovery about the origin of superpowers, what should they do with the knowledge? And will they survive any decision they make? Moore's science fantasy takes place in a recognizable world, and young teens will identify with Brad and his cohorts. Well-crafted characters, moral nuance, and a tale with nice, believable twists make this a great addition to the teen-superhero genre. This is superhero fiction done right. (Fantasy. 12 & up)(Kirkus Reviews, March 1, 2014)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10301932
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1963-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moore, Peter
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
LC call number
PZ7.M787515
LC item number
Vaah 2014
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 6
  • 12
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Superheroes
  • Ability
  • Brothers
  • Good and evil
Target audience
adolescent
Label
V is for villain, Peter Moore
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn855209244
Edition
First edition.
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9781423157496
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2013026304
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)855209244
Label
V is for villain, Peter Moore
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn855209244
Edition
First edition.
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9781423157496
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2013026304
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)855209244

Library Locations

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      30.3529975 -97.7551561
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