Coverart for item
The Resource Tigerland : 1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing, Wil Haygood

Tigerland : 1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing, Wil Haygood

Label
Tigerland : 1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing
Title
Tigerland
Title remainder
1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing
Statement of responsibility
Wil Haygood
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"From the author of the best-selling The Butler--an emotional, inspiring story of two teams from a poor, black, segregated high school in Ohio, who, in the midst of the racial turbulence of 1968/1969, win the Ohio state baseball and basketball championships in the same year. 1968 and 1969: Martin Luther King Jr. and Bobby Kennedy are assassinated. Race relations are frayed like never before. Cities are aflame as demonstrations and riots proliferate. But in Columbus, Ohio, the Tigers of segregated East High School win the baseball and basketball championships, defeating bigger, richer, whiter teams across the state. Now, Wil Haygood gives us a spirited and stirring account of this improbable triumph and takes us deep into the personal lives of these local heroes: Robert Wright, power forward, whose father was a murderer; Kenny Mizelle, the Tigers' second baseman, who grew up under the false impression that his father had died; Eddie 'Rat' Ratleff, the star of both teams, who would play for the 1972 U.S. Olympic basketball team. We meet Jack Gibbs, the first black principal at East High; Bob Hart, the white basketball coach, determined to fight against the injustices he saw inflicting his team; the hometown fans who followed the Tigers to stadiums across the state. And, just as important, Haygood puts the Tigers' story in the context of the racially charged late 1960s. The result is both an inspiring sports story and a singularly illuminating social history"--
Tone
Award
Booklist Editors' Choice, 2018.
Review
  • High school teams bear the symbolic weight of the civil rights movement in this intense sports saga. Journalist Haygood (The Butler) follows the Tigers of East High, an all-black school in Columbus, Ohio, through state championship basketball and baseball seasons in the 1968–1969 school year. The Tigers were already a basketball powerhouse—they had won the previous year’s championship—and most games were predictable blowouts of weaker teams; the baseball players, meanwhile, had an undistinguished regular season, but got lucky in the postseason. Haygood emphasizes racial context as the teams weather the de facto segregation of Columbus schools, encounter racial antagonism at road games in white areas, and start wearing afros; he sets the narrative against national racial tensions, Tiger families’ experiences of poverty and the jim crow South, and accounts of historic civil rights episodes like the Emmett Till lynching and Jackie Robinson’s career. Haygood strains for socio-historical import (“nd so it would be—eleven months after the murder of Martin Luther King Jr.—the black kids from East High would be going to the state championship game”) and overhypes a season that doesn’t feel very significant. Nevertheless, Haygood is a passionate storyteller as he expertly captures this period of civil unrest in an American city. Photos. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed 07/30/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 31, p)
  • The year 1968 was a turning point in American social history with the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the war continuing to rage in Vietnam, and Nixon's southern strategy stoking racial tensions. All of these play a role in Haygood's (The Butler) unique look at an Ohio high school's grand achievement of state championships in both basketball and baseball on the 50th anniversary. Columbus, OH, where East High School stood, was a severely segregated city in 1968. Haygood weaves the political and cultural events of the Sixties as he describes the rise of a white basketball coach, Bob Hart, and his all-African American team straight to a state championship. The narrative also explores the achievements on the baseball diamond in the spring of 1969. Haygood's goal to connect the local stories of Columbus to the wider national conversation on racial integration is successful and illuminating. VERDICT Readers of sports and American history as well as fans of Alejandro Danois's The Boys of Dunbar will find plenty of in-game action as well as historical perspective to cherish. --Keith Klang (Reviewed 10/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 16, p64)
  • /* Starred Review */ During the 1968-1969 school year, an all-black high school soared to win Ohio's basketball and baseball championships. Journalist Haygood (Media, Journalism, and Film/Miami Univ.; The Haygoods of Columbus: A Love Story, 2016, etc.), a Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, tells a story of perseverance, courage, and breathtaking talent as he recounts, in vibrant detail, the achievements of the Tigers, a basketball and baseball team at Columbus, Ohio's inner-city East High School. Drawing on interviews with the athletes and their families, coaches, and teachers as well as published and archival sources, the author creates moving portraits of the teenagers and their undaunted coaches and supporters. "Black boys in a white world," the students lived on the blighted side of town and had always attended underfunded schools; many had mothers who cleaned houses for wealthy whites. But they were uniquely, impressively talented athletes, and sports was a means of proving their worth. The Tigers could not have achieved their success without the help of two dedicated coaches: Bob Hart and Paul Pennell, both white, "big-hearted men who had a social conscience"; nor without the tireless and defiant efforts of Jack Gibbs, Columbus' first black high school principal, an astute networker who roused support from parents, business owners, and community leaders. Because the East Side had the city's highest crime rate, Gibbs made sure the students were kept too busy with school activities to get into mischief. East High "became part progressive laboratory, part military school, a place that had high expectations for student achievement." Haygood dramatically renders the heady excitement of each game, the tense moments of a close contest, and the exuberant—tear-jerking—wins. The inspiring story of East High's championship becomes even more astonishing in the context of endemic racism, which the author closely examines, and "the turmoil of a nation at war and in the midst of unrest," roiled by the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy. An engrossing tale of one shining moment in dark times. (Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2018)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Biography type
contains biographical information
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10692299
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Haygood, Wil
Dewey number
796.32309771/57
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
GV885.73.C65
LC item number
H68 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • East High School (Columbus, Ohio)
  • Basketball
  • Baseball
  • Columbus (Ohio)
  • Columbus (Ohio)
  • SPORTS & RECREATION / Baseball / General
  • SPORTS & RECREATION / Basketball
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Race relations
  • Ohio
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing
Label
Tigerland : 1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing, Wil Haygood
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue: 1968, Reverend King passed this way -- Down to the river -- Eddie Rat meets the Afro-wearing Bo-Pete -- The house that Jack built -- Momentum -- Keeping food in the pantry -- So many dreams in the segregated city -- Panthers and Tigers, oh my -- The church where Martin Luther King Jr. preached -- St. John Arena -- The ballad of Jackie Robinson -- Twilight at Harley Field -- Robert Duncan and Richard Nixon's America -- The catcher in the storm -- Ghosts of the blue birds -- Off into the world -- Blood in Ohio -- Sins laid bare -- Epilogue: Still standing
Control code
on1020311049
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 420 pages
Isbn
9781524731861
Lccn
2018002138
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1020311049
Label
Tigerland : 1968-1969, a city divided, a nation torn apart, and a magical season of healing, Wil Haygood
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue: 1968, Reverend King passed this way -- Down to the river -- Eddie Rat meets the Afro-wearing Bo-Pete -- The house that Jack built -- Momentum -- Keeping food in the pantry -- So many dreams in the segregated city -- Panthers and Tigers, oh my -- The church where Martin Luther King Jr. preached -- St. John Arena -- The ballad of Jackie Robinson -- Twilight at Harley Field -- Robert Duncan and Richard Nixon's America -- The catcher in the storm -- Ghosts of the blue birds -- Off into the world -- Blood in Ohio -- Sins laid bare -- Epilogue: Still standing
Control code
on1020311049
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 420 pages
Isbn
9781524731861
Lccn
2018002138
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1020311049

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