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The Resource Thin blue lie : the failure of high-tech policing, Matt Stroud

Thin blue lie : the failure of high-tech policing, Matt Stroud

Label
Thin blue lie : the failure of high-tech policing
Title
Thin blue lie
Title remainder
the failure of high-tech policing
Statement of responsibility
Matt Stroud
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"American law enforcement is a system in crisis. After explosive protests responding to police brutality and discrimination in Baltimore, Ferguson, and a long list of other cities, the vexing question of how to reform the police and curb misconduct stokes tempers and fears on both the right and left. In the midst of this fierce debate, however, most of us have taken for granted that innovative new technologies can only help. During the early 90s, in the wake of the infamous Rodney King beating, police leaders began looking to corporations and new technologies for help. In the decades since, these technologies have, in theory, given police powerful, previously unthinkable faculties: the ability to incapacitate a suspect without firing a bullet (Tasers); the capacity to more efficiently assign officers to high-crime areas using computers (Compstat); and, with body cameras, a means of defending against accusations of misconduct. But in this vivid, deeply-reported book, Matt Stroud shows that these tools are overhyped and, in many cases, ineffective. Instead of wrestling with tough fundamental questions about their work, police leaders have looked to technology as a silver bullet and stood by as corporate interests have insinuated themselves ever deeper into the public institution of law enforcement. With a sweeping history of these changes, Thin Blue Lie is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand how policing became what it is today."--Amazon.com
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Investigative reporter Stroud delivers a rousing condemnation of “technological solutionism” in police departments. “Adherents of the philosophy,” he writes, “have looked to electroshock weapons, statistical analysis, CCTV, facial recognition, body cameras, and a host of other technologies to supposedly make policing more efficient and humane” but often backfire, instead of undertaking “substantial institutional reform—which can be messy and requires a tough accounting of what’s working and what isn’t in a police department.” He identifies the start of this trend in the changing demographics in cities, where white flight in the 1950s increased segregation and intensified policing. According to Stroud, technology became the typical police response to crime and to increased racial tensions. Stroud reviews policing technology from early-20th-century police captain August Vollmer’s use of the lie detector test in 1921 up to the present trend of police body cameras; in between, he discusses the emergence of COMPSTAT, a policing and crime tracking system that fed into the broken-windows model of policing, and the rise of the Taser, intended to be a nonlethal weapon but nevertheless an instrument of death in many cases. Stroud opines that technological solutions in policing, while perhaps useful, will not address the underlying cultural deficit in empathy and compassion among police. This is a meticulous and fascinating study. (Mar.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 03/25/2019) (Publishers Weekly, vol 266, issue 12, p)
  • An exploration of how high-tech advancements in law enforcement are failing. Journalist Stroud has developed a specialized beat for periodicals about corporations who develop technologies for law enforcement agencies and prisons. In this overview, he shows pointedly that technological devices—including Tasers, body cameras, computerized crime control, facial recognition software, surveillance cameras in public places, and cellphone tracking—may make policing more convenient but do not lead to better outcomes. Much of the narrative is historical, as the author explains how law enforcement evolved in the United States. He takes readers back to 1905, when Berkeley, California—like many cities at the time—lacked a police department. So an ambitious local resident named August Vollmer created a law enforcement unit and sought out whatever firepower technology could provide. Some of Vollmer's ideas—hiring educated officers, reaching out directly to neighborhoods (although more enthusiastically to white enclaves than those with people of color)—were progressive. However, the brute force Vollmer employed set the tone. A century later, Stroud explains, the massive police departments that can most easily afford technology, especially Los Angeles and New York City, are the leaders, with smaller departments often following examples that may be counterproductive. The author's primary narrative thread involves the development and marketing of stun guns, which are often referred to by the name of one brand, the Taser. Though Stroud's lengthy discussions about the financial hurdles faced by stun gun manufacturers become tiresome, on the whole, the author writes clearly and compellingly, and he shows how some companies oversold their technologies to police based on a desperation for profits. Stroud also weaves in concerns about ethics and civil rights and how, often, "the confidence that politicians place in [the technology] reflects an oversimplified understanding of the underlying difficulties." A useful book. Wisely, Stroud never loses sight of an overriding reality: that technology is never a substitute for compassionate policing based on trust between cops and the citizens they are paid to serve. (Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 2019)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10763295
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Stroud, Matt
Dewey number
363.2/30973
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Police
  • Police
  • Police-community relations
  • Police administration
  • Police
  • Police administration
  • Police-community relations
  • United States
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Freedom & Security / Law Enforcement
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the failure of high-tech policing
Label
Thin blue lie : the failure of high-tech policing, Matt Stroud
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1050140134
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
255 pages
Isbn
9781250108296
Lccn
2018038059
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1050140134
Label
Thin blue lie : the failure of high-tech policing, Matt Stroud
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1050140134
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
255 pages
Isbn
9781250108296
Lccn
2018038059
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1050140134

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