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The Resource The vertical farm : feeding the world in the 21st century/, Dickson Despommier

The vertical farm : feeding the world in the 21st century/, Dickson Despommier

Label
The vertical farm : feeding the world in the 21st century/
Title
The vertical farm
Title remainder
feeding the world in the 21st century/
Statement of responsibility
Dickson Despommier
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
When the author, a Columbia professor, set out to solve America's food, water, and energy crises, he didn't just think big, he thought up. His stroke of genius, the vertical farm, has excited scientists, architects, and politicians around the globe. These multi-story intensely managed indoor farms, grown inside skyscrapers, are capable of producing traditional greenhouse crops, as well as pigs and fowl, year-round. They would provide solutions to many of the serious problems the world is facing
Writing style
Review
  • "We invented agriculture at least six different times across the entire globe," Columbia professor Despommier writes in a volume designed to build the case for vertical farms. Despommier's argument is not new, but he is compelling and concise as he weaves together global warming, the population explosion, and other factors encouraging us to explore new ways of feeding ourselves. He is particularly adept in helping readers understand how a well-designed and maintained vertical farm would be a self-contained ecosystem, and how that would lend itself to a more environmentally and economically stable world. However, Despommier is naively optimistic on the ability of large agrochemical companies to "do the right thing and get on board the global green movement" even without economic incentive. Less forgivable is his failure to explain how a vertical farm will actually work. The author says nothing on what plants to plant, or how they are grown, harvested, and distributed. Neither does he mention where these farms should be built, nor who will work them. These specifics are necessary to move his big idea from the concept to reality. Photos. (Oct. 2010) --Staff (Reviewed May 9, 2011) (Publishers Weekly, vol 258, issue 19, p)
  • Despommier (Microbiology and Environmental Sciences/Columbia Univ.) details his optimistic vision of a sustainable future based on urban agriculture. In the past decade, the author and his graduate students have developed the idea of vertical farming, which would move American agriculture from rural areas into high-tech greenhouses stacked up in specially constructed city buildings. This debut is the author's first full discussion of the concept, which has been widely covered in major media but never implemented. Recounting the evolution of agriculture, Despommier argues that traditional farming has ruined our ecosystems and cannot possibly meet the needs of a global population expected to grow to nine billion by 2050. Horizontal farming requires 70 percent of available freshwater, uses 20 percent of fossil fuels yearly and produces runoff that is a major source of water pollution. By contrast, vertical farms would rely on soil-free technologies: hydroponics, which permits growing plants in a water-and-nutrient solution; and aeroponics, which grows plants in a nutrient-laden mist. Housed in transparent buildings to capture sunlight, the urban farms would operate year-round, immune to the weather, and produce dozens of varieties of pesticide-free fruits and vegetables. Lower floors would house chickens and fish subsisting on plant waste. Providing food for "60 percent of the population that will live in cities twenty years from now," the high-rise farms would recycle their own water, use the host city's remediated household wastewater to grow crops, reduce carbon emissions and permit reforestation of farmlands to restore ecosystems and sequester carbon. They would also create new jobs, for workers to build and maintain the vertical farms, and for displaced traditional farmers, who would be paid to return their lands to hardwood forests. How this will sit with agribusiness and other powerful vested interests remains to be seen, but Despommier writes that his quixotic-seeming idea is feasible and has already won enthusiastic attention from scientists and others. The only thing lacking, he writes, is the political will and the hundreds of millions of dollars needed to build a prototype. A captivating argument that will intrigue general readers and give policymakers and investors much to ponder.(Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2010)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
368584
Cataloging source
DNAL/DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Despommier, Dickson D
Dewey number
630
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Urban agriculture
  • Alternative agriculture
  • Agriculture
  • Land use, Urban
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the world grows up
Label
The vertical farm : feeding the world in the 21st century/, Dickson Despommier
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Remodeling nature -- Yesterday's agriculture -- Today's agriculture -- Tomorrow's agriculture -- The vertical farm: advantages -- The vertical farm: form and function -- The vertical farm: social benefits -- The vertical farm: alternate uses -- Food fast-forwarded
Control code
789362
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xiv, 305 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates:
Isbn
9780312611392
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2010029257
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations, color maps;
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780312611392
  • (OCoLC)653476308
Label
The vertical farm : feeding the world in the 21st century/, Dickson Despommier
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Remodeling nature -- Yesterday's agriculture -- Today's agriculture -- Tomorrow's agriculture -- The vertical farm: advantages -- The vertical farm: form and function -- The vertical farm: social benefits -- The vertical farm: alternate uses -- Food fast-forwarded
Control code
789362
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xiv, 305 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates:
Isbn
9780312611392
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2010029257
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations, color maps;
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780312611392
  • (OCoLC)653476308

Library Locations

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      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
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