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The Resource The umbrella, Jan Brett

The umbrella, Jan Brett

Label
The umbrella
Title
The umbrella
Statement of responsibility
Jan Brett
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Carlos goes into the cloud forest to look for animals, but he manages to miss seeing them even though they have an adventure with his umbrella
Tone
Illustration
Review
  • PreS-Gr. 2. In Brett’s newest picture book, inspired by a recent trip to the Monteverde cloud forest in Costa Rica, young Carlos sets out in search of exotic animals that live among the thick vines and tropical foliage. He takes along a green umbrella, which he sets down at the base of a tree before climbing up for a better view. While Carlos scans the “sea of green,” hoping to spot a few cloud-forest friends, a menagerie gathers inside his umbrella, right under his nose--a humorous reversal of the adage about not seeing the forest for the trees. Brett’s characteristically lush paintings portray all the misty, mystical details of a rare tropical habitat and its unfamiliar critters, including a bawling baby tapir, a sleepy kinkajou, a hungry toucan, and a brilliantly plumaged quetzal. The basic Spanish phrases punctuating the dialogue, such as “Vete!” (go away) and “Buena suerte” (good luck), are easily understood through context, and lend authenticity to a story with a deeply rooted sense of place. -- Terry Glover (BookList, 12-01-2004, p658)
  • K-Gr 4 –Young Carlos hopes to spot certain animals in the nearby rain forest but is disappointed when no living things appear. Dropping his umbrella made from leaves, he climbs a tree for a better view. Meanwhile, one by one all of the creatures the boy hoped to see settle into his umbrella, arguing over available space until the weight of a hummingbird tips the whole thing over. The story line, which mimics Brett's The Mitten (1989) and Pamela Allen's amusing Who Sank the Boat? (1983, both Putnam), is a trifle overambitious and seems to sink, like the umbrella, under the weight of its components. The animals lapse into Spanish often enough to perplex readers, since the words and phrases aren't always clearly translated. The text fails to improve on earlier versions of this tale. However, the watercolor-and-gouache illustrations are stunning. Lush vine-framed paintings show a leafy world where countless shades of green are illuminated by tropical flowers and exotic animals. Each spread provides an enticing glimpse of the creature that will appear next and thus an entertaining visual puzzle for children. Despite the narrative's weaknesses, this book can be used as an introduction to the rain forest, and the illustrations alone make it worth owning.–Susan Weitz, Spencer-Van Etten Schools, Spencer, NY --Susan Weitz (Reviewed November 1, 2004) (School Library Journal, vol 50, issue 11, p91)
  • Inspired by the Monteverde Cloud Forest in Costa Rica (according to the jacket flap), Brett's watercolor and gouache art grabs the spotlight in this tale of young Carlos, who carries an umbrella made of giant lush leaves into the forest. He sets it down in order to climb the branches of a fig tree, hoping to catch sight of certain creatures from a higher elevation. Ironically, in a cumulative plot reminiscent of The Mitten , the critters he aims to spy—among them a toucan, kinkajou, tapir, monkey and jaguar—accumulate inside his umbrella below. Brett depicts the main action in a wide horizontal scene on each spread, while leaf-shaped side panels reveal the boy scaling the tree, and preview the next animal to drop into the umbrella. Brett's vivid details—the markings of the tapir's fur, the contrasting reds and greens of the quetzal's feathers—bring the exotic creatures to life. After the monkey flings the umbrella into the river and climbs aboard, the jaguar jumps onto it and the other animals think, "Just don't eat us up!" A dramatic aerial view shows the group floating down river; what rocks the boat is a tiny hummingbird, which alights upon the umbrella handle. The creatures reach the riverbank just as the boy abandons his treetop perch, wondering where all the animals are. The author sprinkles this amiable, smoothly recounted tale with Spanish words. Yet more memorable than her narrative are Brett's paintings—an eye-pleasing introduction to exquisite rainforest residents and vegetation. Ages 4-up. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed August 2, 2004) (Publishers Weekly, vol 251, issue 31, p69)
  • Carlos makes an umbrella from shiny, green fronds to go into the cloud forest, hoping to see many animals. When the only sounds he hears are the drips from the tall trees, he climbs up a giant fig tree to see better, dropping his umbrella upside down on the ground. As the drips collect inside it, a series of animals tumbles in: Froggy, Toucan, Kinkajou, Baby Tapir, Quetzal, and—finally—Monkey, who tosses the umbrella into the river, where it starts to sink. Jaguar pounces on it as it floats by, but when Hummingbird lands on the handle, it's this tiny creature that makes everyone fall out—and the umbrella drifts back to shore. Up in the fig tree, Carlos wonders disappointedly where all the animals are. Insets of leaf shapes telescope the clever contrapuntal action of Carlos's climb and the next creature, while lush watercolor-and-gouache illustrations in vivid greens and bright colors create a diorama effect. The blurb cites the story as a complement to The Mitten (1989) and its snowy setting. Indeed, Brett surpasses herself in this handsomely designed and beautifully executed appreciation of so different a setting. (Picture book. 5-8) (Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 2004)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
133239
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1949-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brett, Jan
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • AD610L
  • Decoding demand: 83 (very high)
  • Semantic demand: 85 (very high)
  • Syntactic demand: 75 (high)
  • Structure demand: 86 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
LG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 0
  • 4
Reading level
2.7
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rain forest animals
  • Umbrellas
Target audience
preschool
Label
The umbrella, Jan Brett
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
494173
Dimensions
22 x 27 cm
Extent
unpaged
Isbn
9780399242151
Lccn
2003027853
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780399242151
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780399242151
  • (Sirsi) ADP-4302
Label
The umbrella, Jan Brett
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
494173
Dimensions
22 x 27 cm
Extent
unpaged
Isbn
9780399242151
Lccn
2003027853
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780399242151
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780399242151
  • (Sirsi) ADP-4302

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Manchaca Road BranchBorrow it
      5500 Manchaca Road, Austin, TX, 78745, US
      30.2166039 -97.79733689999999
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