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The Resource The strong man : John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate, James Rosen

The strong man : John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate, James Rosen

Label
The strong man : John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate
Title
The strong man
Title remainder
John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate
Statement of responsibility
James Rosen
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Review
  • Casting the 66th attorney general and Watergate felon as the most upright man in the Nixon administration is faint praise indeed, to judge by this biography. Fox News correspondent Rosen applauds Mitchell for his tough law-and-order policies, school-desegregation efforts and hard line against leftist radicals, and for enduring wife Martha's alcoholic breakdowns and raving late-night phone calls to reporters. The book's heart is Rosen's meticulous, exhaustively researched study of Mitchell's Watergate role, absolving him of ordering the break-in and most other charges leveled against him. Instead, Mitchell is painted as a force for propriety who was framed by others—especially White House counsel John Dean, who comes off as Watergate's evil genius. (Rosen also claims Watergate burglar James McCord was secretly working for the CIA and deliberately sabotaged the break-in.) Unfortunately, Rosen's salutes to Mitchell's integrity and reverence for the law clash with his accounts of the man's misdeeds: undermining the Paris peace talks, suborning and committing perjury, tolerating the criminal scheming in Nixon's White House and re-election campaign. Mitchell may have blanched at the Nixon administration's sleazy intrigues, as Rosen insists, but he seems not to have risen above them. (Feb. 19) --Staff (Reviewed December 24, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 51, p42)
  • In 1977, John N. Mitchell, Nixon's former attorney general (1969–72) and then manager of his 1972 reelection campaign, became the highest-ranking American official to serve time in prison: 19 months for perjury and obstruction of justice. Rosen (Washington correspondent, Fox News) presents a sympathetic account of Mitchell, who "never dished the dirt on Richard Nixon," although the President tried to make his former law partner the Watergate fall guy. Compounding Mitchell's woes were John Dean, White House counsel, who Rosen claims ordered the Watergate break-in; John Ehrlichman, Nixon's chief domestic policy adviser; Jeb Magruder of the Committee to Reelect the President—all of whom scapegoated Mitchell in their desperate attempts to save themselves from jail—and Martha Mitchell, his unbalanced, alcoholic wife whose public antics made the couple a national embarrassment. Rosen reveals a fascinating but well-buried chapter of Watergate, the Moorer-Radford scandal, in which the Joint Chiefs of Staff spied on Nixon because they thought he was too weak a leader to withstand the Soviets. In this incident and others, Mitchell persuaded Nixon not to retaliate. However, Rosen acknowledges that Mitchell was not without his flaws and indeed did obstruct justice. This fine political biography, casting Mitchell in a controversially positive light, is a good choice for larger public libraries.—Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA --Karl Helicher (Reviewed January 15, 2008) (Library Journal, vol 133, issue 1, p120)
  • A Fox News political correspondent examines the life and legal travails of Nixon's attorney general, the highest-ranking cabinet member ever to be convicted of criminal charges and imprisoned.Thirty-five years ago, ITT lobbyist Dita Beard, fugitive financier Robert Vesco and E. Howard Hunt and the White House "plumbers" were infamous for the possibility that their wrongdoing, loosely grouped under the Watergate heading, reached into the highest levels of the Nixon administration. The president's men proved only too willing to deflect any lawbreaking onto the darkly brooding, former attorney general, John N. Mitchell, Nixon's ostensible friend, law partner and campaign manager. By doing so, they hoped to satisfy the press and prosecutors with the sacrifice of, in Nixon's Domestic Policy Advisor John Erlichman's memorable phrase, "The Big Enchilada." If the supporting cast of wrongdoers has receded into history, so too has Mitchell. He's remembered today for his stewardship at the Justice Department, where his law-and-order crackdown essentially destroyed the New Left, and for his marriage to the alcoholic, severely disturbed Martha Mitchell, whose late-night phone calls to Washington reporters defending her husband and assailing Nixon allowed the press to cast her as a "truth-teller," a heroine of the sordid Watergate affair. As for Mitchell himself, Rosen never quite persuades us that he was, in fact, a warm, witty, genial man, forced to play the role of tough cop and archconservative, a public image demanded by Nixon, responding to the turbulent times. Instead, Rosen's Mitchell possesses all the charm and charisma normally associated with a municipal-bond lawyer, albeit a tremendously successful one. More convincingly, Rosen takes us through the tangled, manifold legal charges Mitchell weathered, demonstrating that the attorney general, while not wholly innocent, stood only on the periphery of the Nixon administration's criminality. He instigated little—White House Counsel John Dean is this story's villain—short-circuited many of the wilder schemes hatched around Nixon and ended up jailed for perjury and obstruction of justice, all in a misguided attempt to protect the presidency. Maybe Mitchell never "controlled" a secret fund dedicated to spying on the Democrats, but his deliciously vulgar reply to reporter Carl Bernstein's late-night phone call levying the charge underscores the era's low tenor. Referring to the Washington Post publisher, Mitchell responded, "Katie Graham's gonna get her tit caught in a big, fat wringer if that's published."As sympathetic and well-argued a defense as Mitchell could have hoped for. (Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2007)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
254799
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1968-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rosen, James
Dewey number
  • 973.924092
  • B
Index
index present
LC call number
KF373.M5349
LC item number
R67 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Mitchell, John N.
  • Attorneys general
  • Watergate Affair, 1972-1974
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate
Label
The strong man : John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate, James Rosen
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
661857
Edition
First edition.
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9780385508643
Lccn
2007049430
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780385508643
  • (OCoLC)154799763
Label
The strong man : John Mitchell and the secrets of Watergate, James Rosen
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
661857
Edition
First edition.
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9780385508643
Lccn
2007049430
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780385508643
  • (OCoLC)154799763

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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