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The Resource The replacement, Brenna Yovanoff

The replacement, Brenna Yovanoff

Label
The replacement
Title
The replacement
Statement of responsibility
Brenna Yovanoff
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Sixteen-year-old Mackie Doyle knows that he replaced a human child when he was just an infant, and when a friend's sister disappears he goes against his family's and town's deliberate denial of the problem to confront the beings that dwell under the town, tampering with human lives
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Award
YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults, 2011
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Grades 9-12 The light paranormals—think vampires, werewolves, angels, faeries, demons—that flood young adult lit often share a similar problem: by merely tweaking established archetypes, they feel largely interchangeable. No such pitfalls bedevil Yovanoff, whose first novel is not only startlingly conceived from the ground up but will still appeal to the legions craving doom, gloom, and, yes, romance. Mackie lives in Gentry, a small town that owes its history of good fortune to an uneasy relationship with the supernatural underground dwellers who protect them. Their price? Merely an annual human sacrifice, which they take in the form of a stolen baby, leaving behind a fragile nonhuman replacement. Mackie is such a replacement, and despite his allergies to iron and blood, he has somehow survived to be a teen—but now is about to meet his makers. The two separate menageries of monsters—housed in a slag heap and a dump hill—are almost Victorian in bearing, and possess an apocalyptic Bradburian worldview: “‘We are pandemonium and disaster. We are the dancing, gibbering horror of the world,’” says the baddest of them all, the Dirt Witch. The climax is not perhaps what it might be, but Yovanoff’s unsettling villains and intriguing moral ambivalence make this effort shockingly original and frequently breathtaking. -- Kraus, Daniel (Reviewed 09-01-2010) (Booklist, vol 107, number 1, p97)
  • Gr 9 Up — In this grim debut novel, the Doyles hide the terrible secret that 16-year-old Mackie is a changeling who was swapped for their real son when he was a baby. In their town of Gentry, there is an unspoken acknowledgment that a child is stolen every seven years in an uneasy bargain for the town's prosperity. Mackie's struggles to go unnoticed are made more difficult by his severe allergies to iron and other metal, his inability to set foot on consecrated ground such as his minister father's church, and his tendency to become severely ill around blood. Now he is dying. When a classmate's baby sister is abducted and a Replacement left in her place, Mackie is reluctantly drawn into the age-old rift between the Morrigan and the Lady, sisters who lead the two changeling clans who live underneath Gentry. Mackie agrees to help the Morrigan maintain the unwitting townspeople's goodwill in exchange for a drug he needs to survive. Meanwhile, he and his friends plot to rescue Tate's stolen sister from the Lady. Yovanoff's innovative plot draws on the changeling legends from Western European folklore. She does an excellent job of creating and sustaining a mood of fear, hopelessness, and misery throughout the novel, something that is lightened only occasionally by Mackie's dry humor and the easy charm of his friend Roswell. The novel ends with a glimmer of hope, though the grisly and disturbing images throughout may overshadow the more positive ending. Still, teens who enjoy horror and dark fantasy novels will no doubt flock to the shelves for Mackie's story.—Leah J. Sparks, formerly at Bowie Public Library, MD --Leah J. Sparks (Reviewed December 1, 2010) (School Library Journal, vol 56, issue 12, p132)
  • Many high school students feel like outsiders, but in this dark fantasy Mackie Doyle has better reason than most to be alienated. Mackie is a changeling, a fairy child exchanged for a stolen human baby. Everyone knows it, though no one will acknowledge it, for fear of upsetting a deal the town made long ago. What, after all, is one baby taken every seven years, in exchange for continued economic prosperity? "Everyone else's unemployment skyrockets, and their tech plants go bankrupt and their dairy farms fail, but not ours," says Mackie's sister, Emma, one of the few who will acknowledge the town's secrets. Mackie, however--sickened by iron, terrified that his neighbors will turn on him--has paid a terrible price, as has Tate Stewart, who is traumatized by the loss of her baby sister, the latest stolen child. Eventually, the two teenagers join forces in an attempt to overturn the town's intolerable status quo. Debut novelist Yovanoff offers well-developed characters, a fascinating take on the Fairy Court, and an exciting story line. Combined with wicked cover art, this book has the makings of a success. Ages 12–up. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed August 16, 2010) (Publishers Weekly, vol 257, issue 32, p)
  • Mackie's nauseated by the scent of blood, is burned by cold iron and would die if he entered a church. None of this helps him avoid notice in his hometown, where close-mouthed neighbors hang horseshoes and leave milk in the garden. No quaint old-world superstitions, these; in the town of Gentry, a child dies mysteriously every seven years. Mackie's been raised to avoid notice, so nobody will recognize him for the changeling his parents and adoring sister know him to be. But with another baby apparently dead and blood and iron all over town, Mackie's having a hard enough time staying upright, let alone under the radar. Soon the sickly boy meets the Morrigan and her court: a mishmash of Celtic mythology with British folklore, elfpunk music and adorable Tim Burton–esque horrors. There's romance and rescue (though mercifully no Edward Cullen types to replace the tale's endearing original couple). Some of the urban-fantasy elements get dropped in the crowd partway through, but enough grotesque goodies remain to keep this a fast-paced, dark delicacy. (Urban fantasy. 12-14)(Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2010)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
369025
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Yovanoff, Brenna
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Intended audience
HL750L
Intended audience source
Lexile
Interest level
UG
LC call number
PZ7.Y89592
LC item number
Rep 2010
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 9
  • 12
Reading level
5.2
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Changelings
  • Conformity
  • Families
  • Missing children
  • Monsters
  • Death
  • Changelings
  • Supernatural
  • Conformity
  • Family life
  • Lost children
  • Monsters
  • Death
Target audience
adolescent
Label
The replacement, Brenna Yovanoff
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
795711
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
343 pages
Isbn
9781595143372
Lccn
2010036066
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(Sirsi) i9781595143372
Label
The replacement, Brenna Yovanoff
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
795711
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
343 pages
Isbn
9781595143372
Lccn
2010036066
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(Sirsi) i9781595143372

Library Locations

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    • Yarborough BranchBorrow it
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      30.3234684 -97.74072129999999
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