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The Resource The rabbit factory, a novel by Marshall Karp

The rabbit factory, a novel by Marshall Karp

Label
The rabbit factory
Title
The rabbit factory
Statement of responsibility
a novel by Marshall Karp
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Welcome to Familyland, an offshoot of Lamaar Studios. Once a small, Southern California animation house, it has grown into an entertainment conglomerate encompassing movies, television, music, video games, and a sprawling theme park. When an actor portraying Familyland's beloved mascot, Rambunctious Rabbit, is brutally murdered on park grounds, Lamaar executives are worried that the idyllic image of '50s America represented in Familyland will be shattered. They ask Mike Lomax and his partner Terry Biggs, the LAPD detectives assigned to solve the case, to keep the circumstances surrounding the death of their mascot quiet."--The publisher
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ In the early pages of Karp's irrepressible and often poignant debut novel, L.A. homicide cop Mike Lomax and his partner, Terry Biggs, are investigating the violent death of the actor portraying Rambunctious Rabbit, the beloved furry mascot at a popular Southern California theme park, Familyland ("Fella was wearing two rabbit's feet, and he still got iced," quips a sheriff at the scene of the crime). The park's parent company, Lamaar Studios, has its finger in a lot of pies--movies, music, television, video games--and the last thing the top brass needs is word of the murder to get out. Lamaar's bubbly, voluptuous PR director, Amy Cheever, is called in to run interference, and detectives Lomax and Biggs are determined to deter her, if only they can avert their eyes from her 38Ds. Soon there's another murder--a Lamaar Studios leading man--and it's clear the killer (a mobster, perhaps, or a vengeful employee?) is hell-bent on bringing the entertainment conglomerate to its knees. Seasoned screenwriter and playwright Karp launches this first in a series with a crisp cast of characters headed by a captivating detective team: Lomax is a handsome, fortysomething widower with a hyperactive conscience; Biggs is a funny, Bronx-born family man with a voice like vintage port. Like the best of Donald Westlake and Carl Hiaasen, The Rabbit Factory is deftly plotted and deliciously askew. -- Allison Block (Reviewed 04-01-2006) (Booklist, vol 102, number 15, p22)
  • /* Starred Review */ The publisher's blurb on playwright and screenplay writer Karp's first novel, "The hilarious and suspenseful introduction of Detectives Mike Lomax and Terry Biggs," makes the two LAPD detectives sound as if they're the reincarnation of the Keystone Kops. They are amusing, but the comedy never overshadows this smart, many-layered thriller. Lomax's beloved wife has died, his doting father is trying to get him to go on dates and his wayward, gambling-addicted brother is in deep trouble. Meanwhile, Lomax is trying to solve a string of high-profile murders aimed at destroying a Disneyesque theme park, Lamaar's Familyland. First, the employee playing Rambunctious Rabbit, Familyland's signature cartoon character, is strangled in his rabbit suit, then a series of other employees and visitors to the park are killed, bringing the company to its knees. Lomax, Biggs and the FBI have their work cut out for them in a clever plot that will keep readers guessing to the very end. Enthusiastic readers will anxiously await the return of detectives Lomax and Biggs. (May) --Staff (Reviewed March 20, 2006) (Publishers Weekly, vol 253, issue 12, p37)
  • In screenwriter Karp's first novel, a man dressed as Rambo the Rabbit is murdered on the hallowed grounds of Familyland, a theme park not situated in Anaheim, CA. Rambo the Rabbit (not Mickey the Mouse) is the signature character of Dean Lamaar, a cartoonist from the Midwest who parlayed his colleagues' talents into a multimillion-dollar empire. Soon it becomes clear that there's a plot against the company, and the detective duo of Mike Lomax and Terry Biggs are on the case. Lomax has a cantankerous but lovable dad whose movie-business background allows bonding over this case, and Biggs is a wannabe standup comic. What might have been a darkly satirical insider's view of the entertainment industry or a detective/buddy novel attempts to be both and loses its fizz well before its 600-plus pages play out. An optional purchase. —Bob Lunn, Kansas City P.L., MO --Bob Lunn (Reviewed May 1, 2006) (Library Journal, vol 131, issue 8, p71)
  • A big, leisurely paced thriller, the first novel for playwright and screenwriter Karp, traces an insidious, insider terrorist attack on a Disney-like cartoon empire in L.A.The Rambunctious Rabbit is the Mickey Mouse of creator Dean Lamaar's vast, popular theme park, Familyland, and the seminal character to be attacked in an attempt to dismantle the animation network based in Costa Luna, Calif. The man strangled in the rabbit suit was in fact a convicted pedophile, leaving the two LAPD homicide detectives assigned to the case, Mike Lomax and Terry Biggs, scratching their heads at how the man got a job working with kids. The casualties pile up over the course of two weeks: A former Lamaar producer is whacked with a bat; a visitor to Familyland is stabbed in the public bathroom; a bomb is set off at a Dallas Burger King, which has developed promotional tie-ins with Lamaar. Who's behind these scarily well-planned attacks aimed at humiliating Lamaar Studios, built up by the genius of now-deceased Dean Lamaar and four of his World War II army buddies—The Cartoon Corp? Protagonist Lomax is a 42-year-old widower, tough-talking but sensitive, and not quite ready to start dating despite the strong-arming of his father, Big Jim, a retired Teamster. In fact, Lomax is still wading sorrowfully through the letters his dead wife left him. During the course of the investigation, all kinds of intriguing subplots erupt, but it's the history of Lamaar Studios that proves key, as the elder members of the Cartoon Corp. express resentment at the vulgar course the network has veered since Dean's death, and the son of one of them, Danny Eeg, still simmers at what he considers unfair treatment of his father. Karp craftily engineers a statement on ethical values, both institutional and personal.A bloated piece of work, devoted more to the pleasure of reading than the offer of a dazzling dnouement. (Kirkus Reviews, April 1, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
144671
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Karp, Marshall
Dewey number
813/.54
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Mike Lomax and Terry Biggs mysteries
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Lomax, Mike (Fictitious character)
  • Biggs, Terry (Fictitious character)
  • Amusement parks
  • Police
  • Amusement parks
  • Biggs, Terry (Fictitious character)
  • Lomax, Mike (Fictitious character)
  • Police
  • Los Angeles (Calif.)
  • California
Label
The rabbit factory, a novel by Marshall Karp
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
592584
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
632 pages
Isbn
9781596921740
Lccn
2006000691
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781596921740
  • (OCoLC)62889017
Label
The rabbit factory, a novel by Marshall Karp
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
592584
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
632 pages
Isbn
9781596921740
Lccn
2006000691
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781596921740
  • (OCoLC)62889017

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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