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The Resource The overnight kidnapper, Andrea Camilleri ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli

The overnight kidnapper, Andrea Camilleri ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli

Label
The overnight kidnapper
Title
The overnight kidnapper
Statement of responsibility
Andrea Camilleri ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli
Creator
Contributor
Author
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • ita
  • eng
Summary
The day gets off to a bad start for Montalbano: while trying to break up a fight on Marinella beach, he hits the wrong man and is stopped by the Carabinieri. When he finally gets to the office, the inspector learns about a strange abduction: a woman was abducted, drugged, and then released unharmed a few hours later. A few days later, the same thing happens again, but this time the woman abducted is the niece of Enzo, the owner of Montalbano's favorite trattoria. The only link between the two events is that both women are thirty years old and work in a bank. -- Back cover
Member of
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • The New York Times best-selling Commissario Salvo Montalbano series marks 25 years of continuous publication with the release of this twenty-fifth entry (after Death at Sea, 2018), and it is a sterling example of the universal appeal that has led the series to be translated into 32 languages. As always, Camilleri works in plenty of Sicilian color and many mentions of delectable local cuisine, best of which just might be the pastry trays Montalbano uses to persuade pathologist Dr. Pasquano to give his undivided attention to the case at hand. After being hauled in by the Carabinieri (interagency turf battles are a series staple) for alleged brawling on the beach, Montalbano is confronted with an extremely puzzling crime. Female bank employees are being abducted, drugged, and then released unharmed a few hours later. An incident of arson and a missing store owner become oddly intertwined with the kidnappings, which need to be resolved before not only general panic, but also bank panic, sets in. Recommend to readers looking for a sure-bet international mystery. -- Jane Murphy (Reviewed 2/1/2019) (Booklist, vol 115, number 11, p34)
  • Two women are abducted, held overnight, and released without harm or ransom demands, stumping Sicily’s Insp. Salvo Montalbano and his colleagues, in bestseller Camilleri’s welcome 23rd novel featuring the world-weary policeman (after 2018’s The Pyramid of Mud). They discover that the first two victims—and then a third—are all low-level bank employees, but otherwise make little progress. Meanwhile, they must look into an arson case and the disappearance of the torched shop’s owner. The stakes rise as the cases intertwine and two bodies turn up. Montalbano punctuates his deductions with wry observations and classical allusions; he follows his frequent lunches at Enzo’s trattoria by seaside walks where he gets his best thinking done. The aging detective’s insights into the darker side of human nature allow him to cut through the red herrings as the action builds to a crisp, decisive ending. The Sicilian dialect of the police station’s switchboard operator, as rendered in Sartarelli’s adept translation, provides comic relief. Camilleri fans are in for a treat. Agent: Carmen Prestia, Alferjeprestia (Italy). (Feb.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 12/24/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 52, p)
  • Insp. Salvo Montalbano arrives at work late one morning, after his attempt to break up a fight ends in all three men, including Montalbano, being arrested by the carabinieri. Once at work, he learns of a kidnapping in which a woman was abducted, drugged, and released unharmed the next morning. Then the same thing happens a second time, with another woman. Both victims are in their 30s and work at banks. When a third kidnapping turns violent, bankers everywhere start to worry. However, Montalbano and his team have another case on their hands. This one is arson, and the owner of the shop, Marcello Di Carlo, has disappeared. Montalbano is shrewd enough to find a connection between Di Carlo's vanishing and the unusual abductions. Camilleri's sequel to The Pyramid of Mud, with its descriptions of Sicilian politics, customs, and food, has enough humor involving the office staff at the police department to be a Sicilian cousin of Bill Crider's "Sheriff Dan Rhodes" mysteries. VERDICT Armchair travelers who enjoy Cay Rademacher's police procedurals set in Provence, France, or Jeffrey Siger's Greece-set crime novels may want to venture to Sicily. --Lesa Holstine (Reviewed 02/01/2019) (Library Journal, vol 144, issue 1, p62)
  • Beleaguered Inspector Montalbano and his ragtag Sicilian force probe a twisty arson case and pursue a serial kidnapper with a surpassingly odd M.O. It's a particularly chaotic morning for Montalbano. An aggressive fly awakens him very early from a sound sleep, he confronts a pair of brawling men in the street and is misidentified as a miscreant, and he returns home to an intruder knocked out by his housekeeper with a frying pan—all before breakfast. The strangeness continues at his favorite trattoria, where owner Enzo's niece Michela reports having been kidnapped and shoved into a car trunk late the previous evening but released without being robbed or harmed in any way. When finally Montalbano arrives at the station, he learns that there was another identical abduction. The only similarity seems to be that both victims work at a bank. Montalbano is just beginning to unravel these crimes when another pops up: a fire at the electronics store of Marcello Di Carlo, who's gone missing after an island vacation during which he reportedly fell in love. All that seems to be missing from his personal effects are his computer and photos of the young woman he met on vacation, though there are stacks of photos of many other women from Di Carlo's recent dating past. Both cases have many twists, with both murder and a mummy on the Montalbano menu. Another wry, amiable procedural from the prolific Camilleri (A Nest of Vipers, 2017, etc.), whose unflappably put-upon hero soldiers on no matter how absurd the crime or aggravating the situation. (Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10756434
Cataloging source
ICU/DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1925-2019
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Camilleri, Andrea
Dewey number
853/.914
Index
no index present
Language note
In English, translated from the Italian
Literary form
novels
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1954-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Sartarelli, Stephen
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Inspector Montalbano series
Series volume
0023
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Abduction
  • Arson
  • Murder
  • FICTION / Mystery & Detective / International Crime & Mystery
  • FICTION / Mystery & Detective / Traditional
  • Abduction
  • Arson
  • Murder
  • Italy
Label
The overnight kidnapper, Andrea Camilleri ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1035428521
Dimensions
20 cm
Extent
257 pages
Isbn
9780143131137
Lccn
2018046802
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1035428521
Label
The overnight kidnapper, Andrea Camilleri ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1035428521
Dimensions
20 cm
Extent
257 pages
Isbn
9780143131137
Lccn
2018046802
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1035428521

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