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The Resource The last founding father : James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness, Harlow Giles Unger

The last founding father : James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness, Harlow Giles Unger

Label
The last founding father : James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness
Title
The last founding father
Title remainder
James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness
Statement of responsibility
Harlow Giles Unger
Title variation
last founding father
Title variation remainder
James Monroe and a nations call to greatness
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The epic story of James Monroe-- the last of America's Founding Fathers -- who transformed a small, fragile nation beset by enemies into a glorious and powerful empire stretching "from sea to shining sea."
Writing style
Review
  • In this well-written biography, Unger (Lafayette ) presents the fifth president as a man of independence and initiative rather than merely a disciple of Jefferson, Madison, and John Quincy Adams. In this respect, he follows Harry Ammon's assessment in James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity . Unger shows that as a diplomat, Monroe went beyond his ministerial instructions to negotiate treaties and the Louisiana Purchase, that as governor of Virginia he effectively used pronouncements to build public support for his policies, and that as President, he used his diplomatic, cabinet, and military experience to proclaim what became known as the Monroe Doctrine. The author's praise for Monroe should have been balanced by some questions about Monroe's ambition (and possible vanity). For example, during the War of 1812, how far did Monroe undermine Secretary of War John Armstrong so that he could take over the post himself? VERDICT Like Gary Hart's James Monroe , in the Times Books series of short presidential biographies, Unger's work will appeal to a more popular audience, especially those who enjoy presidential history or studying the Founding Fathers. Historians and history students should read as well but will still rely on Ammon.—Bryan Craig, MLS, Nellysford, VA --Bryan Craig (Reviewed September 1, 2009) (Library Journal, vol 134, issue 14, p126)
  • Cogent reexamination of a relatively neglected American icon.James Monroe (1758–1831) was a major guiding force in the territorial expansion of the country, argues historian Unger (America's Second Revolution: How George Washington Defeated Patrick Henry and Saved the Nation, 2007, etc.). Monroe was a key negotiator of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, which effectively doubled the nation's territory overnight. More importantly, as the nation's fifth president he kept the country safe from outside attack via the Monroe Doctrine, an 1823 policy that warned European governments that colonization or interference with U.S. states would be viewed as an act of war. As a result, pioneers felt safe enough to trek westward and settle in faraway lands. Less prominent than some of the other Founding Fathers, he was nonetheless present at many major historical events in the revolutionary struggle. As a student in Virginia, he was inspired by Patrick Henry's "give me liberty, or give me death" speech at Richmond in 1775. A soldier under General Washington, he holds the flag in Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze's famous 1851 painting, Washington Crossing the Delaware. Monroe was also Secretary of State and Secretary of War during the War of 1812, the first true military challenge to the nascent United States. Unger ably explains how these experiences later informed Monroe's pragmatic and confident leadership style. The author's treatment of Monroe's relationship with wife Elizabeth is somewhat less interesting and invites unfavorable comparison to David McCullough's excellent John Adams (2001), which used John's correspondence with Abigail in effective and revelatory ways. Still, Unger makes a solid and cohesive argument for Monroe's importance in the early years of the United States, even if he goes too far in his enthusiasm by calling predecessors Adams, Madison and Jefferson "mere caretaker presidents."A worthy attempt to rescue Monroe from obscurity for a mainstream audience. (Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 2009)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
337348
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1931-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Unger, Harlow G.
Dewey number
  • 973.5/4092
  • B
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • portraits
Index
index present
LC call number
E372
LC item number
.U54 2009
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Monroe, James
  • Presidents
  • United States
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness
Label
The last founding father : James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness, Harlow Giles Unger
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 353-376) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
"To be free-- we must fight" -- "A brave-- and sensible officer" -- "I may lose my scalp" -- "A most interesting connection" -- "A subversion of liberty" -- "One continuous scene of riot" -- La belle Américaine -- "Let calumny have its course" -- "To prevent this greatest of evils" -- "Some outrages had been committed" -- Nothing but simple justice" -- To repair an injury -- "We have met the enemy-- " -- "The poor Capital-- crack'd and broken" -- The "Era of Good Feelings" -- "Embroidered with gold" -- "Winked away by compromise" -- A momentous decision -- Rejoice! -- "A plain and gentle man"
Control code
755567
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First Da Capo Press edition.
Extent
xii, 388 pages
Isbn
9780306818080
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2009026195
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps, portraits
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780306818080
  • (OCoLC)316825579
Label
The last founding father : James Monroe and a nation's call to greatness, Harlow Giles Unger
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 353-376) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
"To be free-- we must fight" -- "A brave-- and sensible officer" -- "I may lose my scalp" -- "A most interesting connection" -- "A subversion of liberty" -- "One continuous scene of riot" -- La belle Américaine -- "Let calumny have its course" -- "To prevent this greatest of evils" -- "Some outrages had been committed" -- Nothing but simple justice" -- To repair an injury -- "We have met the enemy-- " -- "The poor Capital-- crack'd and broken" -- The "Era of Good Feelings" -- "Embroidered with gold" -- "Winked away by compromise" -- A momentous decision -- Rejoice! -- "A plain and gentle man"
Control code
755567
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First Da Capo Press edition.
Extent
xii, 388 pages
Isbn
9780306818080
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2009026195
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps, portraits
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780306818080
  • (OCoLC)316825579

Library Locations

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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