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The Resource The enemy : Detroit 1954, Sara Holbrook

The enemy : Detroit 1954, Sara Holbrook

Label
The enemy : Detroit 1954
Title
The enemy
Title remainder
Detroit 1954
Statement of responsibility
Sara Holbrook
Title variation
Detroit 1954
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Set in 1954, this compelling historical novel tells the story of a young girl's struggles and triumphs in the aftermath of World War II. The war is over, but the threat of communism and the Cold War loom over the United States. In Detroit, Michigan, twelve-year-old Marjorie Campbell struggles with the ups and downs of family life, dealing with her veteran father's unpredictable outbursts, keeping her mother's stash of banned library books a secret, and getting along with her new older "brother", the teenager her family took in after his veteran father's death. When a new girl from Germany transfers to Marjorie's class, Marjorie finds herself torn between befriending Inga and pleasing her best friend, Bernadette, by writing in a slam book that spreads rumors about Inga. Marjorie seems to be confronting enemies everywhere--at school, at the library, in her neighborhood, and even in the news. In all this turmoil, Marjorie tries to find her own voice and figure out what is right and who the real enemies actually are."-- Amazon.com
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
Jane Addams Book Award for Books for Older Children, 2018.
Review
  • Gr 5–8—One aspect of becoming an adult—and a dominant theme in this book—is developing the understanding that our perceptions of the truth can be wrong. Marjorie is 12 years old and lives in 1950s Detroit. Not only is her family affected by the fear of communism but her father still struggles as a result of his time fighting in World War II. When Inga Scholtz, a new student from Germany, is seated next to Marjorie in class, the protagonist begins to grapple with her preconceptions and prejudices. Furthering Marjorie's anxiety and confusion, her friends create the "Slam Book" to shame Inga. When everything comes to a head, Marjorie learns that true bravery is standing up to those who use prejudice and untruth to bully and humiliate others. Marjorie is a young woman living in a time when biased opinions are too easily distorted into fact. Holbrook uses her own firsthand knowledge, from her childhood in the 1950s, to demonstrate the impact that the outside political and social climate has on Marjorie and her family. Read-alikes include Christine Kohler's No Surrender Soldier, Monika Schröder's My Brother's Shadow, and Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch's Making Bombs for Hitler. VERDICT A fine example of historical fiction for middle school readers. This will tie in to most curricula and is a good choice for any public or school library collection.—Meaghan Nichols, Archaeological Research Associates, Ont. --Meaghan Nichols (Reviewed 02/01/2017) (School Library Journal, vol 63, issue 02, p90)
  • As 12-year-old Marjorie Campbell navigates the standard awkwardness and small cruelties of sixth-grade life in 1954, she is increasingly plagued by questions. Should she befriend the new girl in school, who claims to be from Canada but seems undeniably German? Should she participate in the slam book her supposed best friend Bernadette has initiated? What about the books her college-educated, independent-thinking mother smuggled out of the library and stashed under Marjorie’s bed? Does wearing a red scarf make her a Commie sympathizer, as Bernadette asserts? And what’s worse, anyway, a Nazi or a Commie? Holbrook (Weird? Let’s Be Friends) brings home the complexities of the Cold War era in a multicultural Detroit neighborhood where neighborliness and name-calling coexist. With a WWII veteran father with PTSD and an annoying fatherless teenage boy living in her family’s basement, Marjorie is a sympathetic character whose struggles to understand fear and prejudice, as embodied in her friends and family, resonate sharply in today’s political climate. An author’s note explains Holbrook’s personal connections to the story and offers further historical detail about the era. Ages 10–14. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed 01/16/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 03, p)
  • Poet Holbrook brings back the Cold War in her debut novel for middle grades. White sixth-grader Marjorie has lots to worry about in the late winter of 1954. Her father came back from World War II jumpy and abrupt. She's not a fan of Frank, the 18-year-old orphan her father took in, or Carol Anne, her skittish 6-year-old sister. She's best friends with Bernadette, also white, who rules the sixth grade and would make the world's worst enemy, and she just got assigned to share a school desk with Inga, a "displaced person" whom Bernadette has decided to hate. Inga came to Detroit from Canada, but she speaks, sounds, and looks German. Marjorie is drawn to Inga, who's sunny, determined, and kind, but she's afraid to befriend her. Meanwhile Sen. Joe McCarthy's national hunt for Communists has led to the banning of many books from public libraries; in defiance of her husband's direct orders, Marjorie's mother hides a box of rescued banned books under Marjorie's bed. Holbrook pulls elements of the story from her own multicultural childhood in Detroit after the war. She's ace at delineating the petty jealousies and tyrannies of middle school girls, and her evocation of the era feels absolutely true. Marjorie's cowardice and ultimate courage lead to a rousingly satisfying ending that, if it doesn't quite tie up all the plot threads, will resonate with readers. A solid fictional examination of a time rarely depicted for this age group. (Historical fiction. 10-14)(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2017)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10559341
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Holbrook, Sara
Dewey number
813.54
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 5
  • 8
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Middle school students
  • Friendship
  • Families
  • Cold War
  • Nineteen fifties
  • Detroit (Mich.)
Target audience
juvenile
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Detroit, 1954
Label
The enemy : Detroit 1954, Sara Holbrook
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 252-256)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn954670688
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
256 pages
Isbn
9781629794983
Lccn
2016951178
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)954670688
Label
The enemy : Detroit 1954, Sara Holbrook
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 252-256)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn954670688
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
256 pages
Isbn
9781629794983
Lccn
2016951178
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)954670688

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Manchaca Road BranchBorrow it
      5500 Manchaca Road, Austin, TX, 78745, US
      30.2166039 -97.79733689999999
    • Twin Oaks BranchBorrow it
      1800 S. Fifth St., Austin, TX, 78704, US
      30.2486884 -97.76239749999999
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