The Resource The common good, Robert B. Reich

The common good, Robert B. Reich

Label
The common good
Title
The common good
Statement of responsibility
Robert B. Reich
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"...Clear-eyed manifesto for re-centering our economics and politics on the idea of the common good. Robert B. Reich...demonstrates that a common good not only exists but in fact constitutes the very essence of any society or nation...We must weigh the moral obligations of citizenship and carefully consider how we as a country should relate to honor, shame, patriotism, truth, and the meaning of leadership...A fundamental statement about the purpose of society and a cri de coeur to save American soul."--Dust jacket flap
Tone
Review
  • Americans have gotten into the habit of looking out for number one at an overall cost to economic and political well-being, argues professor and former labor secretary Reich (Saving Capitalism) in this disquieting meditation. He believes Americans have lost their sense of connectedness, to one another and to larger ideals, leading to political self-destruction in the form of the Trump administration. As to the question of how this all happened, Reich sees Americans as having fallen prey to a whatever-it-takes mentality—whether applied to winning elections, maximizing profits, or rigging the economy. As a remedy, Reich urges a return to the historical ideal of a shared, common good. Most people, he points out, are set up for some degree of cooperation and compassion. Yet society has ended up with self-interested disaster artists such as Martin Shkreli, a former hedge fund manager recently convicted of fraud, who embody the steady erosion of a civic trust Reich sees being fully dismantled by President Trump. This manifesto is geared more toward describing the problem—if there is no common good, Reich points out, there is no society—than resolving it. When Reich asks whether the common good can be restored, he seems genuinely unsure, though he urges his audience to try. Clear-voiced and accessible, this is a provocative look at where the U.S. has failed, if not quite a map to future success. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed 03/19/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 12, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Former U.S. secretary of labor (1993–97) Reich (Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Saving Capitalism) examines what he sees as a divided America. His takeoff point is the call made 50 years ago by President John F. Kennedy for Americans to contribute individually for the common good. Reich despairs that instead Americans have become increasingly selfish. He harshly criticizes the freebooting of CEOs, the self-first philosophy of Ayn Rand, and the divisive presidency of Donald Trump. He chronicles societal changes that he says have resulted in national disunity, distrust, and hopelessness. Reich concludes that pulling together as a society is the only strategy for longterm mutual prosperity and that leaders must act as trustees for the common good. That those who do the right thing should be honored, and those who gain by underhanded means shamed, that fact-based truth must be demanded, and citizens must be both educated and engaged. VERDICT Very timely with discussion of the sexual harassment scandal in Hollywood and NFL kneeling protests, Reich's work is an important call for reform that should appeal to a wide audience disaffected with the status quo. --Lawrence Maxted (Reviewed 03/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 4, p95)
  • Reich (Public Policy/Univ. of California; Saving Capitalism, 2015, etc.) takes a note from Adam Smith and runs with it in this spirited defense of the public sphere. The best economy may be one in which unrestrained trade occurs in keeping with the laws of supply and demand, but it is also one in which human needs are met and externalities such as environmental costs are taken into account. In this new gilded age, writes the author, the common good is often ignored, even if a few interesting things are happening. For one thing, Donald Trump "has at least brought us back to first principles....Trump has got us talking about democracy versus tyranny." The president and his ilk have also gotten us talking about whether there is such a thing as a social contract or a public domain after all. In this brief but well-argued treatise, Reich contrasts shareholder and stakeholder capitalism, the excesses of the former often explained away by the notion that the executive has a fiduciary obligation to increase returns to shareholders no matter what the cost. "The argument is tautological," writes the author. "It assumes that investors are the only people worthy of consideration. What about the common good?" The enemies of the common good are countless, from latter-day slumlords to deregulated megabanks and untrammeled hedge funds, all of which disregard the rules society has evolved to keep transactions fair, "tacit rules that can be exploited by people who view them as opportunities for selfish gain rather than as social constraints." Reich examines the rise of ruleless society as a function of declining trust in social institutions. Against all this, among other things—and now borrowing a page from Sandra Day O'Connor—the author urges a renewal of civic education to enable people "to work with others to separate facts and logic from values and beliefs," including, one assumes, the belief that it is acceptable to rob the public blind. Idealistic and stronger in description than prescription, but a provocative essay nonetheless. (Kirkus Reviews, February 1, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10639631
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1946-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Reich, Robert B
Dewey number
323.6/50973
Index
no index present
LC call number
JC330.15
LC item number
.R455 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Common good
  • Citizenship
  • Political ethics
  • Economics
  • Citizenship
  • Common good
  • Economics
  • Political ethics
  • PHILOSOPHY / Ethics & Moral Philosophy
  • BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Business Ethics
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Civics & Citizenship
  • United States
Label
The common good, Robert B. Reich
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes discussion guide (pages 191-193)
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 187-189)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part I. What is the common good? -- Shkreli -- What good do we have in common? -- The origins of the common good -- Part II. What happened to the common good? -- Exploitation -- Three structural breakdowns -- The decline of the good in common -- Part III. Can the common good be restored? -- Leadership as trusteeship -- Honor and shame -- Resurrecting truth -- Civic education for all
Control code
1924602
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 193 pages
Isbn
9780525520498
Lccn
2017053384
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780525520498
  • (OCoLC)1014000027
Label
The common good, Robert B. Reich
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes discussion guide (pages 191-193)
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 187-189)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part I. What is the common good? -- Shkreli -- What good do we have in common? -- The origins of the common good -- Part II. What happened to the common good? -- Exploitation -- Three structural breakdowns -- The decline of the good in common -- Part III. Can the common good be restored? -- Leadership as trusteeship -- Honor and shame -- Resurrecting truth -- Civic education for all
Control code
1924602
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 193 pages
Isbn
9780525520498
Lccn
2017053384
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780525520498
  • (OCoLC)1014000027

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Howson BranchBorrow it
      2500 Exposition Blvd., Austin, TX, 78703, US
      30.2982508 -97.7675915
    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
    • Pleasant Hill BranchBorrow it
      211 E. William Cannon Blvd., Austin, TX, 78745, US
      30.1922461 -97.7771661
    • Spicewood Springs BranchBorrow it
      8637 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78759, US
      30.4337083 -97.7730809
    • Windsor Park BranchBorrow it
      5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3116523 -97.6902298
    • Yarborough BranchBorrow it
      2200 Hancock Dr., Austin, TX, 78756, US
      30.3234684 -97.74072129999999
Processing Feedback ...