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The Resource The city of Ember, Jeanne DuPrau

The city of Ember, Jeanne DuPrau

Label
The city of Ember
Title
The city of Ember
Statement of responsibility
Jeanne DuPrau
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In the year 241, twelve-year-old Lina trades jobs on Assignment Day to be a Messenger to run to new places in her decaying but beloved city, perhaps even to glimpse Unknown Regions
Member of
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2004
  • Beehive Children's Fiction Book Award (Utah), 2005.
  • Black-Eyed Susan Book Award (Maryland), Grades 6-9, 2006.
  • Garden State Teen Book Award (New Jersey), Fiction (Grades 6-8), 2006.
  • Great Stone Face Children's Book Award (New Hampshire), 2005.
  • Land of Enchantment Book Award (New Mexico), Young Adult category, 2007.
  • Mark Twain Award (Missouri), 2006.
  • Nutmeg Children's Book Award, Intermediate category, 2006.
  • Sunshine State Young Reader's Award (Florida), 2005.
  • William Allen White Children's Book Award (Kansas) for Sixth-Eighth Grade, 2006.
  • YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 2010.
  • Young Hoosier Book Award, Intermediate Books, 2006.
Review
  • Gr. 5-7. Ember, a 241-year-old, ruined domed city surrounded by a dark unknown, was built to ensure that humans would continue to exist on Earth, and the instructions for getting out have been lost and forgotten. On Assignment Day, 12-year-olds leave school and receive their lifetime job assignments. Lina Mayfleet becomes a messenger, and her friend Doon Harrow ends up in the Pipeworks beneath the city, where the failing electric generator has been ineffectually patched together. Both Lina and Doon are convinced that their survival means finding a way out of the city, and after Lina discovers pieces of the instructions, she and Doon work together to interpret the fragmented document. Life in this postholocaust city is well limned--the frequent blackouts, the food shortage, the public panic, the search for answers, and the actions of the powerful, who are taking selfish advantage of the situation. Readers will relate to Lina and Doon’s resourcefulness and courage in the face of ominous odds. (Reviewed April 15, 2003) -- Sally Estes
  • Gr 4-7 –DuPrau debuts with a promisingly competent variation on the tried-and-true "isolated city" theme. More than 200 years after an unspecified holocaust, the residents of Ember have lost all knowledge of anything beyond the area illuminated by the floodlamps on their buildings. The anxiety level is high and rising, for despite relentless recycling, food and other supplies are running low, and the power failures that plunge the town into impenetrable darkness are becoming longer and more frequent. Then Lina, a young foot messenger, discovers a damaged document from the mysterious Builders that hints at a way out. She and Doon, a classmate, piece together enough of the fragmentary directions to find a cave filled with boats near the river that runs beneath Ember, but their rush to announce their discovery almost ends in disaster when the two fall afoul of the corrupt Mayor and his cronies. Lina and Doon escape in a boat, and after a scary journey emerge into an Edenlike wilderness to witness their first sunrise–for Ember, as it turns out, has been built in an immense cavern. Still intent on saving their people, the two find their way back underground at the end, opening the door for sequels. The setting may not be so ingeniously envisioned as those of, say, Joan Aiken's Is Underground (Turtleback, 1995) and Lois Lowry's The Giver (Houghton, 1993), but the quick pace and the uncomplicated characters and situations will keep voracious fans of the genre engaged.–John Peters, New York Public Library --John Peters (Reviewed May 1, 2003) (School Library Journal, vol 49, issue 5, p148)
  • /* Starred Review */ In her electric debut, DuPrau imagines a post-apocalyptic underground world where resources are running out. The city of Ember, "the only light in the dark world," began as a survival experiment created by the "Builders" who wanted their children to "grow up with no knowledge of a world outside, so that they feel no sorrow for what they have lost." An opening prologue describes the Builders' intentions—that Ember's citizens leave the city after 220 years. They tuck "The Instructions" to a way out within a locked box programmed to open at the right time. But the box has gone astray. The story opens on Assignment Day in the year 241, when 12-year-olds Lina Mayfleet and Doon Harrow draw lots for their jobs from the mayor's bag. Lina gets "pipeworks laborer," a job that Doon wants, while Doon draws "messenger," the job that Lina covets, and they trade. Through their perspectives, DuPrau reveals the fascinating details of this subterranean community: as Doon repairs leaks deep down among the Pipeworks, he also learns just how dire the situation is with their malfunctioning generator. Meanwhile, the messages Lina carries point to other sorts of subterfuge. Together, the pair become detectives in search of the truth—part of which may be buried in some strange words that were hidden in Lina's grandmother's closet. Thanks to full-blooded characters every bit as compelling as the plot, Lina and Doon's search parallels the universal adolescent quest for answers. Readers will sit on the edge of their seats as each new truth comes to light. Ages 10-13. (May) --Staff (Reviewed March 10, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 10, p72)
  • /* Starred Review */ This promising debut is set in a dying underground city. Ember, which was founded and stocked with supplies centuries ago by "The Builders," is now desperately short of food, clothes, and electricity to keep the town illuminated. Lina and Doon find long-hidden, undecipherable instructions that send them on a perilous mission to find what they believe must exist: an exit door from their disintegrating town. In the process, they uncover secret governmental corruption and a route to the world above. Well-paced, this contains a satisfying mystery, a breathtaking escape over rooftops in darkness, a harrowing journey into the unknown and cryptic messages for readers to decipher. The setting is well-realized with the constraints of life in the city intriguingly detailed. The likable protagonists are not only courageous but also believably flawed by human pride, their weaknesses often complementing each other in interesting ways. The cliffhanger ending will leave readers clamoring for the next installment. (Fiction. 9-13) (Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2003)
Awards note
  • ALA Notable book.
  • Nutmeg award
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
120912
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
DuPrau, Jeanne
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • 680L
  • Middle School
  • 680
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
MG
LC call number
  • PZ7.D927
  • PS3554.U655
LC item number
  • Ci 2003
  • C58 2003
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 7
Reading level
  • 5.0
  • 5
  • 5.0
  • 5.1
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
The Book of Ember
Series volume
bk. 1
Study program name
  • Accelerated Reader AR
  • Accelerated Reader AR
  • Accelerated Reader
  • Reading Counts!
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fantasy
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Occupations
  • Science fiction
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
The city of Ember, Jeanne DuPrau
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Assignment day -- A message to the mayor -- Under Ember -- Something lost, nothing found -- On night street -- The box in the closet -- A message full of holes -- Explorations -- The door in the roped-off tunnel -- Blue sky and goodbye -- Lizzie's groceries -- A dreadful discovery -- Deciphering the message -- The way out -- A desperate run -- The singing -- Away -- Where the river goes -- A world of light -- The last message
Control code
452356
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
270 pages
Isbn
9780375822735
Lccn
2002010239
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780375822735
  • (OCoLC)50166630
Label
The city of Ember, Jeanne DuPrau
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Assignment day -- A message to the mayor -- Under Ember -- Something lost, nothing found -- On night street -- The box in the closet -- A message full of holes -- Explorations -- The door in the roped-off tunnel -- Blue sky and goodbye -- Lizzie's groceries -- A dreadful discovery -- Deciphering the message -- The way out -- A desperate run -- The singing -- Away -- Where the river goes -- A world of light -- The last message
Control code
452356
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
270 pages
Isbn
9780375822735
Lccn
2002010239
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780375822735
  • (OCoLC)50166630

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Spicewood Springs BranchBorrow it
      8637 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78759, US
      30.4337083 -97.7730809
    • Twin Oaks BranchBorrow it
      1800 S. Fifth St., Austin, TX, 78704, US
      30.2486884 -97.76239749999999
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