The Resource The bully pulpit : Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism, Doris Kearns Goodwin

The bully pulpit : Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism, Doris Kearns Goodwin

Label
The bully pulpit : Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism
Title
The bully pulpit
Title remainder
Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism
Statement of responsibility
Doris Kearns Goodwin
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
A dynamic history of the muckracking press and the first decade of the Progressive era as told through the intense friendship of Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft--a close relationship that strengthens both men before it ruptures in 1912 when they engage in a brutal fight for the presidential nomination that cripples the progressive wing of the Republican Party, causing Democrat Woodrow Wilson to be elected, and changing the country's history
Tone
Writing style
Award
  • Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Non-Fiction, 2014.
  • Booklist Editors' Choice, 2013.
  • New York Times Notable Book, 2013
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Bestselling author Goodwin (Team of Rivals) continues her presidential coverage in her latest history book, this time constructing a narrative around the friendship of two very different Presidents, Roosevelt and William Howard Taft. The complex relationship and soured political camaraderie between Roosevelt and Taft is beautifully played out over the course of the book in quotes and letters. When they angrily part ways it has ramifications for them and the country, eventually leading to Woodrow Wilson's election. Though the book is primarily concerned with the intervening private lives of two politicians, a prominent second narrative emerges as Goodwin links both presidents' fortunes to the rise of ‘muckraking' journalism, specifically the magazine McClure's and its influence over political and social discussion. Women figure largely in both narratives. In addition to journalist Ida Tarbell, both wives, Nellie Taft and Edith Roosevelt appear to have shaped history in their own ways. By shining a light on a little-discussed President and a much-discussed one, Goodwin manages to make history very much alive and relevant. Better yet—the party politics are explicitly modern. Agent: Amanda "Binky" Urban, ICM. (Nov.) --Staff (Reviewed November 18, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 46, p)
  • With best sellers on FDR (No Ordinary Time ) and Lincoln (Team of Rivals ), Pulitzer Prize winner Goodwin tackles the period between those subjects, when President Theodore Roosevelt (TR) and his successor William Howard Taft, with a new breed of investigative reporter, took on greedy industrialists and corrupt politicians. Goodwin excels in capturing the essences of TR and Taft as well as the opposing personalities of their wives. Her main figures are presented objectively and sympathetically. Ironically, as Goodwin clearly shows, the teddy bear should have been named after Taft—for his personality—rather than after TR. Taft was heavily dependent on his wife Nellie's political acumen. Until she had a stroke, Nellie was almost as active as Eleanor Roosevelt was to be. The best part of this volume is the author's presentation of the muckrakers (investigative reporters), whose research TR, in contrast to Taft, was willing to use. Just as TR assembled a talented political team in his administration, Sam McClure of McClure's magazine assembled Ida Tarbell, Lincoln Steffens, Ray Baker, and William Allen White. McClure's "golden age" muckraker empire soon crashed as a result of his manic depression, just as TR's political career ended prematurely. VERDICT It's a long book, but it marks Goodwin's page-turner trifecta on the evolution of the modern presidency. Both presidential buffs and scholars will discover new aspects of the progressive era here. Highly recommended.— William D. Pederson, Louisiana State Univ., Shreveport --William D. Pederson (Reviewed December 1, 2013) (Library Journal, vol 138, issue 22, p110)
  • /* Starred Review */ Swiftly moving account of a friendship that turned sour, broke a political party in two and involved an insistent, omnipresent press corps. Cantor and Boehner? No: Teddy and Taft. Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Goodwin (Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, 2005, etc.) may focus on the great men (and occasionally women) of history, but she is the foremost exponent of a historiographic school that focuses on the armies of aides and enactors that stand behind them. In this instance, one of the principal great men would revel in the title: Theodore Roosevelt wanted nothing more than to be world-renowned, change the world and occasionally shoot a mountain lion. His handpicked successor, William Howard Taft, was something else entirely: He wished to fade into legal scholarship and was very happy in later life to be named to the Supreme Court. The two began as friends of what Taft called "close and sweet intimacy," and the friendship ended--Goodwin evokes this exquisitely well in her closing pages--with a guarded chance encounter in a hotel that slowly thawed but too late. A considerable contributor to the split was TR's progressivism, his trust-busting and efforts to improve the lot of America's working people, which Taft was disinclined to emulate. Moreover, Taft did not warm to TR's great talent, which was to enlist journalists to his cause; problems of objectivity aside, they provided him with the "bully pulpit" of Goodwin's title. She populates her pages with sometimes-forgotten heroes of investigative reporting--Ida Tarbell, Ray Blake, Lincoln Steffens--just as much as Roosevelt and Taft and their aides. The result is an affecting portrait of how networks based on genuine liking contribute to the effective functioning of government without requiring reporters to be sycophants or politicians to give up too many secrets. It's no small achievement to have something new to say on Teddy Roosevelt's presidency, but Goodwin succeeds admirably. A notable, psychologically charged study in leadership.(Kirkus Reviews, November 1, 2013)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10225132
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Goodwin, Doris Kearns
Dewey number
973.91/1
Index
index present
LC call number
E757
LC item number
.G66 2013b
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Roosevelt, Theodore
  • Taft, William H.
  • United States
  • United States
  • Progressivism (United States politics)
  • Press and politics
  • Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism
Label
The bully pulpit : Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism, Doris Kearns Goodwin
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn827262860
Edition
First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9781416547860
Lccn
2013032709
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)827262860
Label
The bully pulpit : Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the golden age of journalism, Doris Kearns Goodwin
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn827262860
Edition
First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.
Extent
pages cm
Isbn
9781416547860
Lccn
2013032709
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)827262860

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