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The Resource The brilliant world of Tom Gates, by Liz Pichon

The brilliant world of Tom Gates, by Liz Pichon

Label
The brilliant world of Tom Gates
Title
The brilliant world of Tom Gates
Statement of responsibility
by Liz Pichon
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Tom Gates is the master of excuses for late homework: dog attacks, spilt water, lightening. Tom's exercise book is full of his doodles, cartoons and thoughts, as well as comments from his long-suffering teacher, Mr Fullerton. After gaining five merits for his 'Camping Sucks' holiday story, Tom's work starts to go downhill, which is a pity, as he's desperate to impress Amy Porter, who sits next to him
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Grades 3-6 The diary-style, comic novel gets a UK makeover with this look at Tom Gates’ fifth-grade year, documenting with hilarious detail every mishap (like forgetting about class-picture day) and success (like hiding his older sister’s sunglasses in some bagged salad). The handwritten font and cartoon drawings bring Tom’s experiences to life, making his struggles and dreams immensely relatable. As with the work of Jeff Kinney, Tom is an average kid who loves to draw, gets bored in class, and occasionally forgets his homework—but always remembers a good excuse why. He also pesters his older sister, is embarrassed by his parents, is starting his first band (Dog Zombies), and has a crush on a girl who doesn’t seem to know he exists. A glossary of British slang and vocabulary will help the American audience tackle “stuff that might sound a bit odd,” like biscuits and dodgy. Tom’s upbeat outlook and everyday trials will have readers laughing out loud and eager for this series’ next installment. -- Smith, Julia (Reviewed 10-15-2014) (Booklist, vol 111, number 4)
  • Gr 3 – 5 — Fifth-grader Tom Gates has a lot of negatives in his life. His older sister annoys him and he retaliates by playing tricks on her. His teachers assign too much homework and when he runs out of time to do it he offers over-the-top, fantastical excuses for why it's not done. Adding to these issues, his family has many mishaps, like failed camping trips and the dog chewing up his tickets to a rock concert. Tom endures it all with his penchant for doodling and writing about everything that happens. For example, whenever the teachers focus on him in class he creates doodles of them staring at him with their "beady eyes." This helps him feel better. His self-centered storytelling is over-the-top but will be enjoyed by those who can't get enough of Jeff Kinney's "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" books (Abrams/Amulet). The engaging illustrations are plentiful and will delight avid and reluctant readers alike. This title was originally published in the United Kingdom; some British words and phrases are sprinkled throughout. A humorous glossary explaining the Briticisms is appended.—Tina Martin, Arlington Heights Memorial Library, IL --Tina Martin (Reviewed November 1, 2014) (School Library Journal, vol 60, issue 11, p105)
  • From his penchant for doodling to his myopic self-interest, fifth-year student Tom Gates can easily be seen as a British cousin to Jeff Kinney’s Greg Heffley. In Tom’s first novel, published in the U.K. in 2011 (where it won a Waterstones Children’s Book Prize and a Roald Dahl Funny Prize), he recounts his ongoing antagonism of his older sister, Delia; his attempts to see his favorite band, Dude3, perform in town; and various family and school-day mishaps, including a disastrous camping trip, inedible meals cooked by his grandparents (aka “the Fossils”), and joining the school choir. The book is typeset in a handwritten-looking font, accompanied by Tom’s doodles and text that he’s embellished for emphasis. A glossary explains the Briticisms Tom uses throughout: “ ‘Rumbled!’ basically means ‘I’m busted!’ ” explains a tiny cartoon of Tom’s head—it’s a phrase he has reason to deploy more than once. Truly laugh-out-loud moments are few and far between, but readers who like their fiction heavily illustrated and their heroes mischievous should find it diverting enough. Ages 8–12. Agent: Caroline Walsh, David Higham Associates. (Aug.) --Staff (Reviewed June 9, 2014) (Publishers Weekly, vol 261, issue 23, p)
  • The winner of the 2011 Roald Dahl Funny Prize for readers ages 7 to 11 makes its way across the pond. In this British contribution to the Wimpy Kid bandwagon, Tom doodles his school days away, fails to do his homework, schemes to get the upper hand on twit Marcus Meldrew, tries to attract the attention of lovely Amy Porter, jockeys for tickets to the Dude3 concert, designs logos for his band, DogZombies, and annoys his older sister, Delia. His account is set in a typeface named for the author (generated from her handwriting, perhaps?) and is liberally illustrated with Tom's cartoons and doodles. Some of his artistic tics are pretty funny: When he refers to his teacher's gaze, he adds two little eyeballs as visual punctuation; goth Delia's expression hardly ever changes, even when she's feeling "jolly"; particularly embarrassing moments are labeled "shame" with little arrows. The book has been unevenly Americanized, leaching from it some of its potential distinctiveness. Most insultingly, "Mum" is now "Mom," but some terms found in the glossary such as "biscuit" and "jumper" have been translated in the text as "cookie" and "sweater," rendering those entries rather baffling. Although Tom's account is diarylike, it is undated, making it feel like the book's action is much shorter than the school term it evidently spans. Tom may be brilliant, but he's unlikely to unseat Greg Heffley in American hearts. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 7-11)(Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 2014)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10173828
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Pichon, Liz
Dewey number
[Fic]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • 650L
  • Decoding demand: 86 (very high)
  • Semantic demand: 99 (very high)
  • Syntactic demand: 87 (very high)
  • Structure demand: 89 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
MG
LC call number
PZ
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 3
  • 5
Reading level
4
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Tom Gates
Series volume
1
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Schools
  • Homework
  • Excuses
Target audience
juvenile
Label
The brilliant world of Tom Gates, by Liz Pichon
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1062420
Dimensions
20 cm.
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
238 pages
Isbn
9780763674724
Lccn
2013952846
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780763674724
  • (OCoLC)869527177
Label
The brilliant world of Tom Gates, by Liz Pichon
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1062420
Dimensions
20 cm.
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
238 pages
Isbn
9780763674724
Lccn
2013952846
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780763674724
  • (OCoLC)869527177

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
    • University Hills BranchBorrow it
      4701 Loyola Ln., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3093017 -97.6664785
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