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The Resource The adoration of Jenna Fox, Mary E. Pearson

The adoration of Jenna Fox, Mary E. Pearson

Label
The adoration of Jenna Fox
Title
The adoration of Jenna Fox
Statement of responsibility
Mary E. Pearson
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In the not-too-distant future, when biotechnological advances have made synthetic bodies and brains possible but illegal, a seventeen-year-old girl, recovering from a serious accident and suffering from memory lapses, learns a startling secret about her existence
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Award
  • School Library Journal Best Books, 2008.
  • Westchester Fiction Award, 2009.
  • YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, 2009
  • YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 2010
Review
  • Gr. 8-12 The ethics of bioengineering in the not-so-distant future drives this story. Jenna, 17,àseverely injured in a car crash, is saved by her heartbroken father, a scientist who illegally uses the latest medical technology to help her. Only 10 per cent of her original brain is saved, but Dad has programmed her by uploading the high-school curriculum. She could live two years, or 200. Is she a monster or a miracle? Why have her parents hidden her away?àThe science (including allusions to the dangerous overuse of antibiotics) and the science fiction are fascinating, but what will hold readers mostàare the moral issues of betrayal, loyalty, sacrifice, and survival. Jenna realizes it is her parents' love that makes them break the law to save her at any cost. The teen's first-person, present-tense narrative is fast and immediate as Jenna makes new friends and confronts the complicated choices she must make now. -- Rochman, Hazel (Reviewed 03-01-2008) (Booklist, vol 104, number 13, p59)
  • /* Starred Review */ Gr 8 Up— Seventeen-year-old Jenna Fox awakens after more than a year in a coma to find herself in a life—and a body—that she doesn't quite recognize. Her parents tell her that she's been in an accident, but much of her past identity and current situation remain a mystery to her: Why has her family abruptly moved from Boston to California, leaving all of her personal belongings behind? Why does her grandmother react to her with such antipathy? Why have her parents instructed her to make sure not to tell anyone about the circumstances of their move? And why can Jenna recite whole passages of Thoreau's Walden , but remember next to nothing of her own past? As she watches family videos of her childhood, strange memories begin to surface, and she slowly realizes that a terrible secret is being kept from her. Pearson has constructed a gripping, believable vision of a future dystopia. She explores issues surrounding scientific ethics, the power of science, and the nature of the soul with grace, poetry, and an apt sense of drama and suspense. Some of the supporting characters are a bit underdeveloped, but Jenna herself is complex, interesting, and very real. This is a beautiful blend of science fiction, medical thriller, and teen-relationship novel that melds into a seamless whole that will please fans of all three genres.—Meredith Robbins, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School, New York City --Meredith Robbins (Reviewed May 1, 2008) (School Library Journal, vol 54, issue 5, p136)
  • /* Starred Review */ Sometime in the near future, Jenna Fox, 17, awakens from an 18-month-long coma following a devastating accident, her memory nearly blank. She attempts reorientation by watching videos of her childhood, "recorded beyond reason"— by worshipful parents, but mysteries proliferate. Jenna can recite passages from Thoreau yet can't remember having any friends. As memories return, however, Jenna starts picking at the explanation her parents have spun until it unravels. Pearson (A Room on Lorelei Street ) uses each revelation to steadily build tension until the true horror comes into focus. Even then Pearson does not stop; she raises the ante in unexpected ways until the very last page. Clues are supplied by the supporting cast: Jenna's father, who made his fortune in biotechnology; a classmate whose loss of limbs has turned her into a crusader for medical ethics; Jenna's Catholic grandmother, who is hostile to her. A few lapses in logic--if Jenna's father is world-famous and the family in hiding, why does she enroll in school under her real name?--can be forgiven in favor of expert plotting and the complex questions raised about ethics and the nature of the soul. Ages 14-up. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed March 3, 2008) (Publishers Weekly, vol 255, issue 9, p49)
  • /* Starred Review */ Outstanding examination of identity, science and ethics. "I used to be someone. / Someone named Jenna Fox. / That's what they tell me," begins the hypnotic first-person narration. She woke from an 18-month coma two weeks ago, but she doesn't know how to smile or who her parents are. She watches recordings of each childhood year but they ring no bells. Why has her family brought her to a hidden cottage in California, distant from home and doctors? Mental flashes reveal a void of paralysis where "darkness and silence go on forever." Was that her coma? Voices call Jenna, hurry! into her ears—are those from the night of the accident, which she can't remember? Jenna recognizes that her gait is awkward and her memory peculiar (spotty about childhood while disturbingly perfect about academics), but asking questions provokes only furtive glances between her parents. Pearson reveals the truth layer by layer, maintaining taut suspense and psychological realism as she probes philosophical notions of personhood. A deeply humane and gripping descendent of Peter Dickinson's classic Eva. (Science fiction. YA) (Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2008)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
257390
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Pearson, Mary
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • 570L
  • Decoding demand: 98 (very high)
  • Semantic demand: 100 (very high)
  • Syntactic demand: 80 (high)
  • Structure demand: 88 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Interest level
UG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 8
  • 12
Reading level
3.8
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Jenna Fox chronicles
Series volume
0001
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Medical ethics
  • Bioethics
  • Biotechnology
  • Self-perception
  • Memory
  • Medical ethics
  • Bioethics
  • Biotechnology
  • Self-perception
  • Memory
  • Science fiction
Target audience
adolescent
Label
The adoration of Jenna Fox, Mary E. Pearson
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
671353
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
266 pages
Isbn
9780805076684
Isbn Type
(hc : alk. paper)
Lccn
2007027314
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780805076684
  • (OCoLC)162145841
Label
The adoration of Jenna Fox, Mary E. Pearson
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
671353
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
266 pages
Isbn
9780805076684
Isbn Type
(hc : alk. paper)
Lccn
2007027314
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780805076684
  • (OCoLC)162145841

Library Locations

    • Ruiz BranchBorrow it
      1600 Grove Blvd., Austin, TX, 78741, US
      30.2298616 -97.7070109
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      30.1876256 -97.7419319
    • St. John BranchBorrow it
      7500 Blessing Ave., Austin, TX, 78752, US
      30.3328231 -97.6937014
    • Terrazas BranchBorrow it
      1105 E. Cesar Chavez St., Austin, TX, 78702, US
      30.2599154 -97.7334621
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