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The Resource The Whiskey Rebellion : George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty, William Hogeland

The Whiskey Rebellion : George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty, William Hogeland

Label
The Whiskey Rebellion : George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty
Title
The Whiskey Rebellion
Title remainder
George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty
Statement of responsibility
William Hogeland
Title variation
Whiskey Rebellion
Title variation remainder
George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged Americas newfound sovereignty
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
A tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, this story pits President George Washington and Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton against angry, armed settlers across the Appalachians. Unearthing a pungent segment of early American history, journalist and popular historian Hogeland brings to life the rebellion that decisively contributed to the establishment of federal authority. In 1791, frontier gangs with blackened faces began to attack federal officials, beating and torturing the collectors who plagued them with the first federal tax ever laid on an American product--whiskey. In only a few years, those attacks snowballed into an organized regional movement dedicated to resisting the fledgling government's power and threatening secession, even civil war. With an unsparing look at both Hamilton and Washington--and at lesser-known, equally determined frontier leaders, Hogeland offers a fast-paced account of the remarkable characters who perpetrated this forgotten revolution, and those who suppressed it.--From publisher description
Review
  • Soon after Americans ousted inequitable British taxation, Secretary of Finance Alexander Hamilton, hatched a plan to put the new nation on steady financial footing by imposing the first American excise tax, on whiskey makers. The tax favored large distillers over small farmers with stills in the mountains of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, and the farmers fomented their own new revolution—a challenge to the sovereignty of the new government and the power of the wealthy eastern seaboard. In a fast-paced, blow-by-blow account of this "primal national drama," journalist Hogeland energetically chronicles the skirmishes that made the Whiskey Rebellion from 1791 to 1795 a symbol of the conflict between republican ideals and capitalist values. The rebels engaged in civil disobedience, violence against the tax collectors and threatened to secede from the new republic. Eventually Washington led federal troops to quell the rebellion, arresting leaders such as Herman Husband, a hollow-eyed evangelist who believed that the rebellion would usher in the New Jerusalem. Hogeland's judicious, spirited study offers a lucid window into a mostly forgotten episode in American history and a perceptive parable about the pursuit of political plans no matter what the cost to the nation's unity. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed December 12, 2005) (Publishers Weekly, vol 252, issue 49, p46)
  • Contrarian account of a contrarian struggle, in some senses America's first civil war.If it's mentioned at all in survey texts, the Whiskey Rebellion is usually seen as an effort on the part of simpleminded frontiersmen to keep Washington revenuers from taxing their corn mash, a sort of postcolonial Snuffy Smith. The rebellion was more complicated, as freelance journalist Hogeland shows; though plenty of roughshod and untutored frontier figures took up arms against the federal government, the movement to resist excise taxes that favored wealthy and large producers of booze over mom-and-pop operations was widely perceived as justifiable opposition to tyranny. Blame it on Alexander Hamilton; the first treasury secretary found it expedient to retire war debts owed to wealthy domestic creditors by levying charges of many kinds on states, communities and consumers. His financier ally, Robert Morris, benefited greatly from the repayment (plus interest, and lots of it) of the war debt; he also "controlled all real power in Congress, as well as the Continental Army" and was, by Hogeland's account, a scammer and a scoundrel. After the revolution, Hamilton labored to bring the independent-minded western frontier—then extending not much further west than Pittsburgh—under the control of tax agents such as John Neville, who lived on a splendid estate staffed by slaves in the abolition-minded, poor Appalachians; a key moment in the rebellion of 1791 was the incineration of that fine estate by a grim army dressed in blackface, Indian garb and even women's clothing. Led by an offbeat evangelist who experienced visions and believed in such strange ideas as profit-sharing and a progressive income tax, the rebellion was quickly suppressed by federal troops at George Washington's order—though, as Hogeland notes, Washington himself took to making whiskey soon afterward, even as his successor, Thomas Jefferson, repealed the hated whiskey tax.A vigorous, revealing look at a forgotten—and confusing—chapter in American history, one that invites critical reconsideration of a founding father or two. (Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2005)
Biography type
contains biographical information
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
163937
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hogeland, William
Dewey number
973.4/3
Illustrations
maps
Index
index present
LC call number
E315
LC item number
.H64 2006
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Whiskey Rebellion, Pa., 1794
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty
Label
The Whiskey Rebellion : George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty, William Hogeland
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
"A Lisa Drew book."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-286) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
592996
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
vii, 302 pages
Isbn
9780743254908
Lccn
2005056340
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780743254908
Other physical details
maps
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780743254908
Label
The Whiskey Rebellion : George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the frontier rebels who challenged America's newfound sovereignty, William Hogeland
Publication
Copyright
Note
"A Lisa Drew book."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-286) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
592996
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
vii, 302 pages
Isbn
9780743254908
Lccn
2005056340
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780743254908
Other physical details
maps
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780743254908

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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