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The Resource Talking to robots : tales from our human-robot futures, David Ewing Duncan

Talking to robots : tales from our human-robot futures, David Ewing Duncan

Label
Talking to robots : tales from our human-robot futures
Title
Talking to robots
Title remainder
tales from our human-robot futures
Statement of responsibility
David Ewing Duncan
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Science journalist Duncan (Experimental Man) takes a lighter approach to a serious issue—the future relationship between humankind and thinking machines—than readers drawn to it might appreciate. Building on the ideas of current thinkers, including Brian Greene, Dean Kamen, and Craig Venter, Duncan touches on concerns such as the limits (if any) of AI, and the impact of robot workers replacing most human ones. Duncan presents each chapter from the perspective of a visitor from the future, an initially intriguing premise that ultimately ill-serves the serious ethical problems he raises, such as whether negative memories should be preserved by a device able to preserve an individual’s entire memory, or if autism represents a condition in need of curing, as posited by a neurologist’s 2018 proposal for an “Opti-Brain” that would “collect real-time data on everything imaginable to do with your brain, physiology, and environment.” Instead, silly satirical scenarios, such as President Trump’s replacement by a robot doppelgänger, or autonomous military computers reenacting the ending of the Matthew Broderick movie WarGames, undermine the discussion. As a result, Duncan’s book comes off as a missed opportunity to make the complexities surrounding artificial intelligence accessible by leavening, but not overwhelming, a topical subject with humor. Agent: Mitch Hoffman, Aaron M. Priest Literary. (July) --Staff (Reviewed 06/10/2019) (Publishers Weekly, vol 266, issue 23, p)
  • A refreshing variation on the will-intelligent-robots-bring-Armageddon genre. Early on in his latest look into the future, science journalist Duncan (When I'm 164: The New Science of Radical Life Extension, and What Happens if It Succeeds, 2012, etc.) points out that "humans of the present day seem obsessed with robots, real and imagined, as we embrace dueling visions of robo-utopias and robo-dystopias that titillate, bring hope, and scare the bejesus out of us. Possibly the very speed and whoosh of technological newness is contributing to our insistence on anthropomorphizing every machine in sight." His response is not to interview experts himself but assign this task to a cheerful observer from the future who records their predictions from the Early Robot Era of the early 2000s and then describes what happens over the following decades, millennia, and until the end of time. Each chapter title describes a species of "bot," but matters gradually grow complex. Readers will smile at the Teddy Bot, every future toddler's favorite, a stuffed animal-robot hybrid that plays games, answers questions, and provides moral guidance, safety, and perhaps even discipline. There are doc bots, warrior bots, coffee delivery bot, Amazon bots, and the inevitable sex bots. Readers seeking insight from the chapter on politician bots will discover that Donald Trump is a robot, a glitch-y, bug-ridden version whose code is easy to hack—by Russian operatives, Sean Hannity, Stormy Daniels, etc. No doomsayer, Duncan is often more optimistic than many average readers. In his future, when driverless technology reaches perfection and drivers vanish, the public revolts, demanding (and willing to pay) to have them back. Physicians and surgeons lose their jobs once robodoctors prove less error prone and cheaper, but patients yearn for the personal touch and force the rehiring of humans. Well, maybe.... Despite its terrible record, predicting the future exerts an endless fascination, and this colorful mixture of expert futurology and quirky speculation does not disappoint. (Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2019)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10785318
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Duncan, David Ewing
Dewey number
629.8/924019
Index
no index present
LC call number
TJ211.49
LC item number
.D86 2019
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Robotics
  • Human-robot interaction
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
tales from our human-robot futures
Label
Talking to robots : tales from our human-robot futures, David Ewing Duncan
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Teddy bear bot -- The %$@! robot that swiped my job -- Sex (intimacy) bot -- Facebook bot -- Doc bot -- Hello, robot driver -- Warrior bot -- Beer bot -- It's not about the robots bot -- Politician bot -- Wearable bot -- Amazon bot -- Journalism bot -- Mars (Daemon) bot -- Risk-free bot -- Brain optimization bot -- Coffee delivery bot -- Memory bot -- Matrix bot -- Homo digitalis/homo syntheticis -- Tourist (evolution) bot -- God bot -- Immortal me bot
Control code
2019004797
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
viii, 303 pages
Isbn
9781524743598
Lccn
2019004797
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1060195343
Label
Talking to robots : tales from our human-robot futures, David Ewing Duncan
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Teddy bear bot -- The %$@! robot that swiped my job -- Sex (intimacy) bot -- Facebook bot -- Doc bot -- Hello, robot driver -- Warrior bot -- Beer bot -- It's not about the robots bot -- Politician bot -- Wearable bot -- Amazon bot -- Journalism bot -- Mars (Daemon) bot -- Risk-free bot -- Brain optimization bot -- Coffee delivery bot -- Memory bot -- Matrix bot -- Homo digitalis/homo syntheticis -- Tourist (evolution) bot -- God bot -- Immortal me bot
Control code
2019004797
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
viii, 303 pages
Isbn
9781524743598
Lccn
2019004797
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1060195343

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