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The Resource Talking God : philosophers on belief, [edited by] Gary Gutting

Talking God : philosophers on belief, [edited by] Gary Gutting

Label
Talking God : philosophers on belief
Title
Talking God
Title remainder
philosophers on belief
Statement of responsibility
[edited by] Gary Gutting
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
As tensions simmer, and often explode, between the secular and the religious forces in modern life, the big questions about human belief press ever more urgently. Where does belief, or its lack, originate? How can we understand and appreciate religious traditions different from our own? Featuring conversations with twelve skeptics, atheists, agnostics, and believers including Alvin Plantinga, Philip Kitcher, Michael Ruse, and John Caputo Talking God offers new perspectives on religion, including the challenge to believers from evolution, cutting-edge physics and cosmology; arguments both for and against atheism; and meditations on the value of secular humanism and faith in the modern world. Experts offer insights on Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism, as well as Judaism and Christianity. Topical and illuminating, Talking God gives readers a deeper understanding of faith today and how philosophers understand it
Writing style
Review
  • In this collection of 12 interviews that first appeared in 2014 in The Stone, the philosophy blog of the New York Times, Notre Dame philosophy professor Gutting (What Philosophy Can Do) poses a series of questions to contemporary philosophers about age-old questions: Does God exist? How can an all-powerful and all-good god exist in a world filled with evil and suffering? What’s the relationship between science and religion? Gutting prefaces each interview with a brief introduction and follows it with a brief set of “further thoughts” about the issues raised in the interview. Calvin College professor Alvin Plantinga argues against atheism because “assuming a lack of evidence either for or against God’s existence, agnosticism is a more rational position than atheism.” Louise Anthony is certain that God doesn’t exist both because she denies that supernatural beings exist outside of natural law and because she finds the argument from evil overwhelmingly persuasive. Gutting also discusses religion and deconstruction with John Caputo, soft atheism with Philip Kitcher, religion and evolution with Michael Ruse, and Hinduism with Jonardon Ganeri, among others. Gutting doesn’t cover new ground here, and adds little to the material already available online, but this book nevertheless provides a helpful introduction to anyone interested in the intersection of philosophy and religion. (Nov.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 09/12/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 37, p)
  • Gutting (Endowed Chair in Philosophy Emeritus, Univ. of Notre Dame; What Philosophy Can Do), a self-described agnostic and practicing Catholic, presents a series of interviews from his contributions to the Stone (the New York Times philosophy blog) on disciplines that range from philosophy of religion to philosophy of science, and some that do not fit into that well-defined spectrum. Gutting shows himself to be a generous interviewer, with exchanges that sharpen and expand upon the interviewee's positions rather than shut down or bolster them. Each interview is bracketed by an introduction and a reflection. The introductions acquaint readers with the subject and the philosophical terms and ideas. The reflections fill out the interviews and present ideas for further thought; they also serve to tie the interviews together. VERDICT Gutting provides evidence to those new to philosophy that beliefs that are not subject to direct empirical scrutiny can be reasonably maintained, even if not always reasonably decided. Like the author's What Philosophy Can Do, this book is for those new to the subject who are curious about whether its tools enhance understanding. --James Wetherbee (Reviewed 11/01/2016) (School Library Journal, vol 141, issue 18, p82)
  • /* Starred Review */ Approachable, civilized discussions about the existence of God.Gutting (Philosophy/Univ. of Notre Dame; What Philosophy Can Do, 2015, etc.) presents a collection of conversations with other philosophers, all of which originally appeared in The Stone, the philosophy blog of the New York Times. Interested in learning why most professional philosophers self-identify as atheist, as opposed to agnostic, the author interviewed a representative set of philosophers to learn their views about theism. The result is a fascinating, meaningful set of conversations that will intrigue believers and nonbelievers alike. After discussing theism and atheism broadly with Alvin Plantinga and Louise Antony, Gutting moves on to philosophical and academic topics as they apply to the subject of God: deconstruction (John Caputo), naturalism (Howard Wettstein), pragmatism (Philip Kitcher), cosmology/physics (Tim Maudlin), evolution (Michael Ruse), epistemology (Keith DeRose), and history (Daniel Garber). Gutting also realizes that the debate over God in the Western academy too often centers on the Judeo-Christian concept of divinity. Consequently, he also reached out to philosophers of other faith traditions in search of a balanced discussion: Islam (Sajjad Rizvi), Hinduism (Jonardon Ganeri), and Buddhism (Jay Garfield). Gutting and his collaborators present a welcome respite to the vitriolic works of the New Atheists—Hitchens, Dawkins et al.—offering reasoned, civil, and fair explorations of timeless issues. In each case, whether theist, agnostic, or atheist, the interlocutors discuss with respect for opposing views and with humility for what questions can and cannot be fully answered. Rather than seeing the argument as a contest to be won or lost, these philosophers honor the reality that larger issues of justice and morality are at play. As Kitcher puts it, “let’s be inspired by the world’s collection of religious metaphors insofar as they help us improve the human situation. Humanism first, atheism second.” An exceptional introduction to the philosophical questions surrounding God and atheism.(Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 1900)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10541705
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
210
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Gutting, Gary
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Religions
  • Religions
  • Faith
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
philosophers on belief
Label
Talking God : philosophers on belief, [edited by] Gary Gutting
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1650954
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First Edition.
Extent
xii, 219 pages
Isbn
9780393352818
Lccn
2016023255
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780393352818
  • (OCoLC)937452603
Label
Talking God : philosophers on belief, [edited by] Gary Gutting
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1650954
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First Edition.
Extent
xii, 219 pages
Isbn
9780393352818
Lccn
2016023255
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780393352818
  • (OCoLC)937452603

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