Coverart for item
The Resource Rise of the warrior cop : the militarization of America's police forces, Radley Balko

Rise of the warrior cop : the militarization of America's police forces, Radley Balko

Label
Rise of the warrior cop : the militarization of America's police forces
Title
Rise of the warrior cop
Title remainder
the militarization of America's police forces
Statement of responsibility
Radley Balko
Title variation
Rise of the warrior cop
Title variation remainder
the militarization of Americas police forces
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • ”Are cops constitutional?” It’s a bold and provocative question, and the more Balko (Overkill) delves into the history of law enforcement, the more that question seems worth considering. And yet it’s not the mere presence of a police force that concerns the Cato Institute policy analyst (he readily concedes that one is necessary to any functional society); it’s the force’s gradual militarization that bothers him and many who’ve found themselves on the wrong side of a SWAT team. Our country’s “founding statesmen were adamant about the dangers of armed, standing forces,” but Balko argues that we have strayed far from their vision. From the creation of the first SWAT teams in response to the violent riots of the 1960s, to the literal war on drugs, the much-publicized crackdowns on the Occupy movements, and the increasingly frequent deployments of heavily armed units to address minor incidents (underage drinking, anyone? unlicensed barbers?), the list of questionable tactics and militarized raids has grown longer with each passing year, especially in the wake of 9/11. The problem, Balko insists, is that we “tend not to take notice of such long-developing trends, even when they directly affect us. The first and perhaps largest barrier to halting police militarization has probably been awareness.” After reading Balko, you’ll be aware, alright—and scared. Agent: Howard Yoon, Ross Yoon. (July 9) --Staff (Reviewed June 3, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 22, p)
  • Huffington Post senior investigative reporter Balko combines a searing exposé focusing on a specific kind of police brutality with a contextual history of police violence from the Roman Empire through today. The contemporary brutality forming the centerpiece of the exposé derives from Special Weapons and Tactics units--SWAT teams. At Reason magazine and, before that, at the Cato Institute, Balko was a pioneer at tracking the excessive violence of SWAT teams, especially in the context of raids on private homes suspected of harboring violators of drug laws. With SWAT teams often serving as the front line in the so-called "war on drugs," abuses have been occurring with alarming frequency since the 1960s. Balko takes pains to state that police officers face daily danger and that most of them serve honorably. However, he writes, those who volunteer for SWAT teams or are chosen by police chiefs and sheriffs frequently harbor a cowboy mentality inappropriate when raiding homes unannounced with high-velocity weapons at the ready. Balko provides copious examples of SWAT teams raiding the wrong addresses or finding nothing but decriminalized marijuana inside. Meanwhile, injuries and sometimes deaths occur, and community trust in the police is shattered. And it can happen anywhere: The author opens with an egregiously conducted SWAT raid in Columbia, Mo., a small city with few violent drug offenders. Some of the historical sections are slow going--the book is organized chronologically, which means little compelling information arrives before page 50--and the book sometimes loses focus as Balko overreaches in terms of police department operations, which are only loosely related to SWAT team conduct. Nonetheless, the vast amount of evidence is certain to give pause to even the most ardent supporters of law enforcement agencies. An important, sometimes-groundbreaking account of police gone wild.(Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2013)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10185545
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Balko, Radley
Dewey number
363.20973
Index
index present
LC call number
HV8080.S64
LC item number
B354 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Police
  • Police
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the militarization of America's police forces
Label
Rise of the warrior cop : the militarization of America's police forces, Radley Balko
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
From Rome to writs -- Soldiers in the streets -- A quick history of cops in America -- The 1960s- from root causes to brute force -- The 1970s- pinch and retreat -- The 1980s- us and them -- The 1990s- it's all about the numbers -- The 2000s- a whole new war -- Reform
Control code
958909
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xvi, 382 pages
Isbn
9781610392112
Lccn
2013009304
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(Sirsi) i9781610392112
Label
Rise of the warrior cop : the militarization of America's police forces, Radley Balko
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
From Rome to writs -- Soldiers in the streets -- A quick history of cops in America -- The 1960s- from root causes to brute force -- The 1970s- pinch and retreat -- The 1980s- us and them -- The 1990s- it's all about the numbers -- The 2000s- a whole new war -- Reform
Control code
958909
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xvi, 382 pages
Isbn
9781610392112
Lccn
2013009304
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(Sirsi) i9781610392112

Library Locations

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      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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