Coverart for item
The Resource Rifka takes a bow, Betty Rosenberg Perlov ; illustrated by Cosei Kawa

Rifka takes a bow, Betty Rosenberg Perlov ; illustrated by Cosei Kawa

Label
Rifka takes a bow
Title
Rifka takes a bow
Statement of responsibility
Betty Rosenberg Perlov ; illustrated by Cosei Kawa
Creator
Contributor
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A young girl's family is part of a Yiddish theater performance group active in New York City
Review
  • Preschool-Grade 1 Children won’t know what the Yiddish theater was (until they read this title’s informative afterword), but that doesn’t matter much. Here, the focus is on the magic of performing and the wonder a little girl feels when she is—accidentally—on stage. In a direct first-person voice, Rifka begins by telling readers how Papa pastes on a mustache, and Mama puts on a white wig; suddenly they are old. Life can be fun for the child of thespians—stopping at the Automat for snacks and wearing makeup for fun. But when Rifka hits the boards, she is the one who gets the applause. Author Perlov, now in her late 90s, is the daughter of Yiddish theater thespians, so much of what she writes is from her own memories. Kawa’s imaginative mixed-media artwork, reminiscent of Pamela Zagarenski’s stylistic pictures, captures the fantasy world of the theater. A few photos at the end give a better idea of New York’s Lower East Side. As the old rye bread ad used to say, you don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy this. -- Cooper, Ilene (Reviewed 09-15-2013) (Booklist, vol 110, number 2, p73)
  • PreS-Gr 2 — This picture book gives a glimpse into the world of the Second Avenue Yiddish theaters of 1920s New York. Young Rifka's parents are both actors, and the child loves everything about their work, from the dark backstage area, to the stored props under the stage, to the glamorous chorus girls in the dressing room, who laugh and joke and sometimes let her wear their makeup. The stylized illustrations give an air of memory and fantasy with elongated figures and confettilike shapes floating throughout the pictures. Details such as a trip to the Automat and Rifka's mother's bobbed hair add more historical context. The child's moment to shine comes when she accidentally walks onstage through a balcony door. In the family spirit of the Yiddish theater, she is welcomed by her parents and the audience alike and invited center stage for her bow in the spotlight. Perlov, herself a child actor in the days of Yiddish radio, paints an affectionate and nostalgic picture of the era with her words. A nice addition to collections wishing to highlight the American Jewish experience.—Martha Link Yesowitch, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, NC --Martha Link Yesowitch (Reviewed August 1, 2013) (School Library Journal, vol 59, issue 8, p87)
  • /* Starred Review */ Rifka accidentally finds herself onstage in a Yiddish theater production and speaks her first lines as an actress: "Piff-Paff! Not to worry." The Yiddish theater was a vibrant part of immigrant life in New York in the first part of the 20th century. Rifka's parents are actors who introduce her to the magical world of that theater. She is especially impressed with the way in which her parents can take on the personae of the characters they play, with just a bit of makeup, some props and costumes, and changes in body language. The surrounding elements of the city are also part of the fun. They travel on the subway with its noise and diversity. They eat at the Automat, putting in their nickels and taking out the food. Perlov makes it all come alive, employing a conversational syntax that speaks directly to readers. It is a memoir told with love and nostalgia, for it is her own story, told from a distance of nine decades. Kawa's illustrations are as magical as any theater experience. She employs a variety of media to turn real places and events into fantasy landscapes from several perspectives, in dreamlike images that are somewhat reminiscent of Chagall. Look closely and there are tiny shapes and designs floating through the larger pictures. Unusual and unabashedly charming. (afterword) (Picture book. 5-9)(Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2013)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10217434
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Perlov, Betty Rosenberg
Dewey number
[E]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Interest level
LG
LC call number
PZ7.P43247
LC item number
Ri 2013
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 2
Reading level
3.5
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Kawa, Cosei
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Theater, Yiddish
  • Jews
  • Theater, Yiddish
  • Jews
  • New York (N.Y.)
  • New York (N.Y.)
Target audience
preschool
Label
Rifka takes a bow, Betty Rosenberg Perlov ; illustrated by Cosei Kawa
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
985291
Dimensions
29 cm
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780761381273
Lccn
2012028985
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations (chiefly color)
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780761381273
Label
Rifka takes a bow, Betty Rosenberg Perlov ; illustrated by Cosei Kawa
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
985291
Dimensions
29 cm
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780761381273
Lccn
2012028985
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations (chiefly color)
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780761381273

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
Processing Feedback ...