Coverart for item
The Resource Reagan, in his own hand : the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America, edited, with an introduction and commentary by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, Martin Anderson ; with a foreword by George P. Schultz

Reagan, in his own hand : the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America, edited, with an introduction and commentary by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, Martin Anderson ; with a foreword by George P. Schultz

Label
Reagan, in his own hand : the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America
Title
Reagan, in his own hand
Title remainder
the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America
Statement of responsibility
edited, with an introduction and commentary by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, Martin Anderson ; with a foreword by George P. Schultz
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Storyline
Writing style
Review
  • Ronald Reagan is a puzzle: How, many wonder (and as Shultz puts it in his foreword), could he know so little and accomplish so much? The editors of this volume (two former Reagan advisers [Anderson and Anderson] and a historian [Skinner]) believe the question can be answered through Reagan's own writings. Associates describe Reagan as constantly writing, whether at home or in a hotel room,in a car or on a plane, recording his thoughts on the issues of the day. The product was almost always some form of public address, written and edited by hand.A collection of these manuscripts is presented here, just as Reagan wrote them,including his corrections and notes. With a few exceptions, they are very shortradio commentaries delivered during the pre-presidential period (1975-1979), focusing mostly on foreign policy and the economy, and framed in terms of the general issue of government and freedom. There are no surprises; whether one sees Reagan as the great communicator, articulating deeply held convictions through theexpression of simple but profound truths, or as the not-too-bright actor, painting a complex world in the reductionistic tones of black and white, one's expectations will be confirmed. In foreign policy Reagan is the essential Cold Warrior, understanding the world in terms of an "ideological struggle" between Communism and the proponents of freedom. In domestic policy he is the committed capitalist, always suspicious of government regulation and critical of taxation, and not above propagating theories of Communist conspiracy. Indeed, theuniformity of his outlook is quite remarkable, and whether one considers this astrength or a weakness this volume drives home the single-mindedness of the former president. (Feb. 6) Forecast: Given Reagan's enduring popularity, this could find a broad market, and a five-city author tour may pique readers' interest. Primarily, however, the book will appeal to serious students of historytrying to put Reagan's ideas and ideology in historical context. First serial to the New York Times Magazine. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
  • This is a fascinating and valuable collection of Ronald Reagan's writings, from his youth up to his eloquent and moving final letter to the public announcing that he had Alzheimer's disease. Included are poems, short stories, speeches, columns, radio addresses, and other glimpses into the personality, character, and mind of one of the more important of the modern presidents. Taken together, these pieces suggest a breadth of mind not often attributed to Reagan. Heremains a controversial figure whose legacy is still contested intellectual terrain. Reagan's supporters, intent on establishing a positive image for theformer president, often title their works about him with words like great and outstanding. This effort follows in that fawning tradition by attributing a "revolutionary" vision to Reagan. But what is revealed here instead is rather mundane. By trying desperately to convince us that he was something that he clearly was not, the editors do both Reagan and his readers a disservice. However,this collection is an excellent glimpse into Reagan the man and the thinker. Itwill be useful for anyone who wishes to understand this important figure. [Reagan's 90th birthday is February 6.DEd].DMichael A. Genovese, Loyola Marymount Univ., Los Angeles Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
  • Handwritten documents suggesting that Ronald Reagan did more of his own thinking and research than generally believed, and that even before he became president he was already articulating the ideas that became the "Reagan Doctrine."In his foreword, former Secretary of State George Schultz argues that this collection is important because it "provides a key to unlocking the mystery of Reagan" and speculates that "maybe he was a lot smarter than most people thought." Most of the numerous essays included here were written in longhand by then-Governor Reagan before he recorded them for broadcast between 1975 and 1979: they thus presumably reflect his own work rather than talking points crafted by others. The speeches cover Reagan's philosophy and his ideas on foreign, domestic, and economic policy, reflecting a depth of preparation not usually associated with him. As he pondered the question of nuclear weapons, for instance, he quoted from NSC 68 (the 1950 National Security Council paper prepared for President Truman), warning that the Soviet Union would not be deterred by moral persuasion—only force would suffice. Elsewhere, Reagan frequently cited Congressional reports, The Economist, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, as well as a wide range of books and speeches. Characteristically, he used this data not to impress but rather to strengthen his points—points that were invariably phrased in accessible, personalized, and colloquial prose. The volume also includes Reagan's early writings from high school and college, a few drafts of his speeches (including the 1980 State of the Union address), and his moving letter to the nation announcing that he had Alzheimer's disease.A timely reminder of just why the 40th president was called "The Great Communicator," plus some persuasive evidence that he was quite knowledgeable about what he wanted to communicate. (Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2000)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
165575
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Reagan, Ronald
Illustrations
facsimiles
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1936-2015
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Skinner, Kiron K
  • Anderson, Annelise Graebner
  • Anderson, Martin
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Reagan, Ronald
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America
Label
Reagan, in his own hand : the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America, edited, with an introduction and commentary by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, Martin Anderson ; with a foreword by George P. Schultz
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
394859
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xxvi, 549 pages
Isbn
9780743201230
Lccn
00066304
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
facsimiles
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780743201230
  • (Sirsi) ADA-3292
Label
Reagan, in his own hand : the writings of Ronald Reagan that reveal his revolutionary vision for America, edited, with an introduction and commentary by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, Martin Anderson ; with a foreword by George P. Schultz
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
394859
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xxvi, 549 pages
Isbn
9780743201230
Lccn
00066304
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
facsimiles
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780743201230
  • (Sirsi) ADA-3292

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Milwood BranchBorrow it
      12500 Amherst Dr, Austin, TX, 78727, US
      30.4223444 -97.7161692
Processing Feedback ...