Coverart for item
The Resource Radicalization : why some people choose the path of violence, Farhad Khosrokhavar ; translated by Jane Marie Todd

Radicalization : why some people choose the path of violence, Farhad Khosrokhavar ; translated by Jane Marie Todd

Label
Radicalization : why some people choose the path of violence
Title
Radicalization
Title remainder
why some people choose the path of violence
Statement of responsibility
Farhad Khosrokhavar ; translated by Jane Marie Todd
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Summary
In the wake of the Paris, Beirut, and San Bernardino terrorist attacks, fears over "homegrown terrorism" have surfaced to a degree not seen since September 11, 2001--especially following the news that all of the perpetrators in Paris were European citizens. A sought-after commentator in France and a widely respected international scholar of radical Islam, Farhad Khosrokhavar has spent years studying the path towards radicalization, focusing particularly on the key role of prisons--based on interviews with dozens of Islamic radicals--as incubators of a particular brand of outrage that has yielded so many attacks over the past decade. Khosrokhavar argues that the root problem of radicalization is not a particular ideology but rather a set of steps that young men and women follow, steps he distills clearly in this deeply researched account, one that spans both Europe and the United States. With insights that apply equally to far-right terrorists and Islamic radicals, Khosrokhavar argues that our security-focused solutions are pruning the branches rather than attacking the roots--which lie in the breakdown of social institutions, the expansion of prisons, and the rise of joblessness, which create disaffected communities with a sharp sense of grievance against the mainstream
Member of
Tone
Review
A French scholar delineates the attractions of violent extremism, specifically jihadi Islam.In this concise translation from the French, Khosrokhavar (Director of Studies/School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences, Paris) moves from general notions of radicalization, which have historically involved pockets of marginalized and ghettoized minorities from the 11th-century Assassins to the Europeans terrorists in the "years of lead," to the specific current ideological radicalism in the Muslim world. What has changed? The author emphasizes that this newest crop of radicals involves a phenomenon that is "more intense" than previous eras: larger in scope, more widespread, enduring over a longer period of time, and involving more random violence and a troubling "capacity to adapt to extreme situations through reorganization"—e.g., the adaptability of al-Qaida. Khosrokhavar finds that radicalization takes different paths in the Muslim world and in the European theater. In the former, the radicals tend to be young people from the middle classes who feel disenfranchised against corrupt and authoritative regimes and are bent on establishing "a transnational Islamic regime." In the latter, young radicals emerge from the lower social strata in tough neighborhoods and are often children of immigrants, such as the young people of North African descent in France. The author looks at the small but growing numbers of women joining radical jihadism, often acting to avenge the death of a husband, brother, or father or acting out (in a severely repressed Muslim society) from an "antipatriarchal, even feminist dimension." Living in France, Khosrokhavar is particularly attuned to the radicalization that occurs among the young immigrants living in the banlieues of Lyon and elsewhere, fraught by ghetto conditions and "intense dehumanization," and he offers insight into the radicalization that occurs in prisons, when vulnerable criminals are converted by a charismatic "radicalizer." A timely, systematic breakdown of thee reasons for radicalization.(Kirkus Reviews, November 1, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10548563
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Khosrokhavar, Farhad
Dewey number
320.55/7
Index
index present
Language note
Translated from the French
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Islamic fundamentalism
  • Radicalism
  • Radicalism
  • Terrorism
  • Jihad
  • Islam and politics
  • Radicalization
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Ideologies / Radicalism
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Violence in Society
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
why some people choose the path of violence
Label
Radicalization : why some people choose the path of violence, Farhad Khosrokhavar ; translated by Jane Marie Todd
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"Originally published in France as Radicalisation in 2015 by Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l'homme, Paris."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 155-157) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn945232343
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
167 pages
Isbn
9781620972687
Lccn
2016045843
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)945232343
Label
Radicalization : why some people choose the path of violence, Farhad Khosrokhavar ; translated by Jane Marie Todd
Publication
Note
"Originally published in France as Radicalisation in 2015 by Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l'homme, Paris."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 155-157) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocn945232343
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
167 pages
Isbn
9781620972687
Lccn
2016045843
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)945232343

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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