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The Resource Princess Furball, retold by Charlotte Huck ; illustrated by Anita Lobel

Princess Furball, retold by Charlotte Huck ; illustrated by Anita Lobel

Label
Princess Furball
Title
Princess Furball
Statement of responsibility
retold by Charlotte Huck ; illustrated by Anita Lobel
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A princess in a coat of a thousand furs hides her identity from a king who falls in love with her
Tone
Illustration
Review
  • Gr 1-4-- In this variant of the Cinderella story, a motherless princess grows into an accomplished and capable young woman. It's a good thing, too, for her heartless father intends to marry her to an ogre in exchange for 50 wagonloads of silver. The princess, thinking her demands will be impossible to meet, requests four bridal gifts--a dress as golden as the sun, one as silvery as the moon, a third as glittering as the stars, and a coat made from the skins of 1000 animals. When her father meets her demands, the princess dons her coat of a thousand furs, packs her three dresses into a walnut shell, and runs away, taking along a special soup seasoning and three small treasures that had belonged to her mother. Disguised by her strange coat, Furball, as she is now called, finds work as a drudge in a neighboring king's kitchen. When the king gives a ball, she dresses herself in the gown of gold and attends. The princess attends a second ball, and a third, leaving each one abruptly and dropping golden tokens in the prince's soup after each appearance. At the last ball, the prince slips the golden ring on her finger before she disappears, and when the ragged Furball is brought before him, can identify her as his mysterious guest and future wife. Huck's telling is smooth and graceful, with a slightly rustic informality perfectly echoed by Lobel's flat, primitive style. With a palette that ranges from warm brown to radiant white, the illustrations complement the storyline visually, placing it in an undefined middle-European setting. Author and illustrator have created a strong female character: particularly endearing in her coat of fur, she is resourceful and charming throughout. The princess' reliance on her own abilities and the absence of obvious magical help make this a fresh and satisfying addition to library collections of all sizes. --Linda Boyles, Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL (Reviewed September 1989)
  • Huck deftly retells a variant of the Cinderella story in her first book for children. A golden-haired princess, distressed when her father betroths her to an ogre, runs away, disguising herself in a coat made of a thousand furs. Princess Furball works as a ``servant to the servants'' in the house of a young king until, like Perrault's Cinderella, she dazzles the court at the king's ball. The complex unraveling of her mysterious identity involves three walnuts, three gold treasures, three ball gowns--and the seasonings for a delectable soup with which the princess fools the king. Huck's princess is not only beautiful but clever, and the solutions to her problems are of her own devising. Lobel's elegantly composed paintings, in vivid Renaissance colors, are as lovely as the princess herself. Ages 4-7. (Reviewed September 1989)
  • In her first children's book, a well-known expert on children's literature retells (without citing a particular source) her own childhood favorite: a variant of Cinderella in which a princess escapes marriage to an ogre and becomes a scullery maid in a new kingdom where she eventually marries the king. The many appealing details here include the fur cloak that gives the princess her name and the golden talismans she puts in the king's soup; Huck's version is straightforward and well-paced, while Lobel's lively pictorial interpretation recalls fine tapestries through its rich colors and designs burgeoning with ornamental detail. Though her flat, stylized foregrounds are occasionally at odds with bits of deep, architectural perspective, this is a handsome edition. (Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 1989)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
091869
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Huck, Charlotte S
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Interest level
LG
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 1
  • 4
Reading level
4.7
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Lobel, Anita
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fairy tales
  • Folklore
Target audience
juvenile
Label
Princess Furball, retold by Charlotte Huck ; illustrated by Anita Lobel
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
170487
Extent
1 volume unpaged
Isbn
9780688078379
Lccn
88018780 /AC
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780688078379
  • (Sirsi) AAW-1357
Label
Princess Furball, retold by Charlotte Huck ; illustrated by Anita Lobel
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
170487
Extent
1 volume unpaged
Isbn
9780688078379
Lccn
88018780 /AC
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780688078379
  • (Sirsi) AAW-1357

Library Locations

    • Terrazas BranchBorrow it
      1105 E. Cesar Chavez St., Austin, TX, 78702, US
      30.2599154 -97.7334621
    • Twin Oaks BranchBorrow it
      1800 S. Fifth St., Austin, TX, 78704, US
      30.2486884 -97.76239749999999
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