Coverart for item
The Resource Peace be upon you : the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence, Zachary Karabell

Peace be upon you : the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence, Zachary Karabell

Label
Peace be upon you : the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence
Title
Peace be upon you
Title remainder
the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence
Statement of responsibility
Zachary Karabell
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Includes information on Abbasid caliphate, Afghanistan, al Qaeda, Alexandria, Andalusia, Antioch, Arabic language, Armenians, Baghdad, Balkans, Beirut, Berbers, Byzantine Empire, Cairo, Christianity, Christians, Constantinople, Cordoba, Crusades, Damascus, Egypt, England, Europe, Fatimid dynasty, France, Franks, Greek Orthodox Church, ancient Greeks, Habsburgs, Caliph Harun al-Rashid, Hebrew language, Heraclius (Byzantine Emperor), Hezbollah, Holy Land, Hospitallers, Sharif Husayn ibn Ali, Iberian Peninsula, India, Iran, Iraq, Islam, Israel, Istanbul, Janissaries, Jerusalem, Jesus Christ, Jews, jihad, Judaism, Latin language, Lebanon, Moses Maimonides, Maronite Christian Church, Mecca, Medina, Mediterranean Sea, Sultan Mehmed II, monks, monasteries, Morocco, Muhammad ibn Abdullah (Prophet), Muslims, mysticism, nationalism, North Africa, Ottoman Empire, Pakistan, Palestine, Paris, People of the Book, People of the Pact, Persia, poetry, Quran (Koran), Quraysh tribe, reform movements, Roman Catholic Church, Rome, Russia, Saladin, Salonica, Seljuk dynasty, September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Spain, sultan Suleyman I, Syria, Templars, Torah, Turkey, Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab, World War I, World War II, Zionism, Zoroastrians, etc
Award
Library Journal Best Books, 2007.
Review
  • Conventional wisdom says that Christians, Jews and Muslims cannot get along and have never gotten along; the Crusades, the Inquisition and September 11 have all fueled the flames of constant religious intolerance. In a pedantic and frustrating study, journalist Karabell (The Last Campaign ) challenges this view by pointing to numerous but little-known periods of peaceful coexistence among the three religions. For example, he points to John of Damascus's condemnation of Islam as a Christian heresy as a powerful indication of the close connection between the two faiths in the early Middle Ages. During the Crusades, Christian rulers often adopted the policies of the Muslim governments they had supplanted, while in the 19th century, some Muslim nations attempted to emulate the progress of Europe and to coexist more peacefully with European nations. Karabell points to Dubai as an area in which such ironic coexistence still occurs and wonders whether Dubai holds the key to the future. Regrettably, the moments of peaceful coexistence are hard to spot in Karabell's narrative, since the largest portions are occupied with the ways that Christians, Jews and Muslims have failed to get along. (Mar. 2) --Staff (Reviewed January 29, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 5, p62)
  • If this reviewer were God, Allah, or master of the universe, and if he were inclined to remind Muslims, Jews, and Christians that they've lived most of the last 1400 years in peaceful coexistence and cooperation rather than violence and intolerance, this is the book he would write for them. Karabell (The Last Campaign: How Harry Truman Won the 1948 Election ), who writes essays and reviews for the New York Times , the Wall Street Journal , and Foreign Affairs , manages to weave an engaging, dispassionate, and "omniscient Big Picture" of the interaction of these three religions. He patiently criticizes believers, politicians, the media, and extremists in the West and the Middle East who myopically recall only instances of death and war instead of the hopeful and unifying "lulls" of peace and calm, which may not make for interesting history but have aided in this world's very survival. Karabell shows that this nearly forgotten heritage can help us envision (and act upon) a more stable and secure 21st century—one in which the shared watchword is peace, not conflict. Highly recommended for all libraries and readers. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/06.]—Gary P. Gillum, Brigham Young Univ. Lib., Provo, UT --Gary P. Gillum (Reviewed March 1, 2007) (Library Journal, vol 132, issue 4, p88)
  • Against the clash-of-civilizations model, prolific writer Karabell (Parting the Desert, 2003, etc.) reminds readers that there was a time when monotheisms coexisted in relative peace.Peace is at the core of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, Karabell urges, even if the times seem to have summoned up a militant air, the West fearing fundamentalism, the Arab world imperialism. The scholarly and popular emphasis on visions of war, ethnic strife and inter-religious competition, Karabell suggests, will in time obscure the achievements of times past, when followers of the three religions found it congenial to live and work together. It's to be noted that those arrangements flourished mostly when Muslims held power, in places such as the Baghdad of the golden age (which, Karabell allows, was "never quite as golden as it looked through the misty eyes of later generations"), the Jerusalem of Saladin, the Istanbul of the early Ottomans and, famously, the Cžrdoba of the Umayyads. "For a brief period," writes Karabell, "Muslim Spain was the most vibrant place on earth." Indeed, and even if the Ottomans' treatment of Christians and Jews was non-discriminating largely in the sense that all the empire's subjects were mere "instruments of the state and servants of the sultan," Karabell's case studies suggest that there is no good doctrinal reason we all just can't get along. There are, of course, other reasons, ranging from old-fashioned ignorance to the attacks of 9/11 and the long human tradition of murdering one's other-thinking neighbors. His curious conclusion is that a future zone of tolerance might look something like Dubai—another place, of course, where Muslims rule over non-Muslim minorities that have suddenly become the majority.Thin compared to more closely focused works such as Mar"a Rosa Menocal's The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain (2002). (Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
197184
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Karabell, Zachary
Dewey number
201/.5
Illustrations
maps
Index
index present
LC call number
BL410
LC item number
.K37 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Religions
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence
Label
Peace be upon you : the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence, Zachary Karabell
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip071/2006031501.html
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-326) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction -- In the name of the Lord -- At the court of the caliph -- The sacrifice of Isaac -- The crusades -- Saladin's jihad? -- The philosopher's dream -- The lord of two lands -- The tide begins to turn -- Brave new worlds -- The age of reform -- Hope and despair -- In an otherwise turbulent world -- Coda : is Dubai the future? Maps -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- Index
Control code
629220
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
343 pages
Isbn
9781400043682
Lccn
2006031501
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781400043682
  • (OCoLC)71810014
Label
Peace be upon you : the story of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish coexistence, Zachary Karabell
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip071/2006031501.html
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-326) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction -- In the name of the Lord -- At the court of the caliph -- The sacrifice of Isaac -- The crusades -- Saladin's jihad? -- The philosopher's dream -- The lord of two lands -- The tide begins to turn -- Brave new worlds -- The age of reform -- Hope and despair -- In an otherwise turbulent world -- Coda : is Dubai the future? Maps -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- Index
Control code
629220
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
343 pages
Isbn
9781400043682
Lccn
2006031501
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781400043682
  • (OCoLC)71810014

Library Locations

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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