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The Resource One nation under God : how corporate America invented Christian America, Kevin M. Kruse

One nation under God : how corporate America invented Christian America, Kevin M. Kruse

Label
One nation under God : how corporate America invented Christian America
Title
One nation under God
Title remainder
how corporate America invented Christian America
Statement of responsibility
Kevin M. Kruse
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"In One Nation Under God, award-winning historian Kevin M. Kruse argues that the story of Christian America begins with the Great Depression, when a coalition of businessmen and religious leaders united in opposition to the New Deal. As Kruse shows, corporations from General Motors and Kraft Foods to J.C. Penney and Hilton Hotels, poured money into the coffers of conservative religious leaders, who in turn used those funds to attack FDR's New Deal administration as a program of "pagan statism" that perverted the central tenet of Christianity: the salvation of the individual"--
Review
  • Princeton historian Kruse (White Flight ) wonders “why so many contemporary Americans came to believe that has always been and always should be a Christian nation” and finds answers among a group of 1930s anti–New Deal industrialists intent on promoting “Christian libertarianism”—a philosophy that preached the salvation of the individual through free enterprise. These businessmen, alongside clergy such as Billy Graham, saw an Eisenhower presidency as an opportunity to “inspire the American people to a more spiritual way of life.” Yet the Eisenhower Administration produced little more than ceremonial deism. Kruse argues that superficial displays—such as adding “under God” to the Pledge of Allegiance—may have created the religious tradition we see today, but more significant attempts to bridge the gap between church and state were blocked by the Supreme Court. The movement may even have died were it not for Nixon, who cynically evoked nostalgia for 1950s-era stability to win the presidency and helped transform the Silent Majority into the Moral Majority. Kruse sidesteps the question of whether America actually had a religious founding, describing instead how 20th-century politicians exploited this idea, but by doing so, he misses a critical opportunity to separate history from myth and chicanery. B&w photos. Agent: Geri Thoma, Writers House. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed February 9, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 06, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Patriotism, capitalism, and Christianity have served as the religious right's trinity for decades. Religion has become so well rooted in the Conservative movement that we scarcely consider how it all began. For Kruse (History, Princeton Univ.; White Flight ), however, this question serves as the foundation for thorough and thought-provoking scholarship. Here the author takes us from an America battered by the Depression and enlightened by the New Deal—a time when industrialists faced a public relations nightmare—to modern-day America, where God, once a fleeting mention in the political arena, has become an indispensable shout-out. Kruse reveals the ingenious marketing campaign designed to bring scripture to big business. By uniting themselves with pastors, ministers, and reverends, industrialists gave themselves a trusted voice to explain the relationship between free enterprise, love of country, and love of God. VERDICT Kruse reveals the marketing machine behind American godliness with authority, insight, and clarity. He illustrates key turning points along the way to provide a cohesive picture of a well-powered movement. He hands us the agenda behind the Pledge of Allegiance, "in God we trust," and other cornerstones of American patriotism. In short, he exposes the PR man behind the pious curtain. [See "Editors' Spring Picks," p. 32.]— Erin Entrada Kelly, Philadelphia, PA --Erin Entrada Kelly (Reviewed February 15, 2015) (Library Journal, vol 140, issue 3, p112)
  • /* Starred Review */ Kruse (History/Princeton Univ.; White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism, 2007, etc.) explains the links between capitalism and Christianity.This history is linked to industry's reaction to reform, born during the Progressive Era, revived by the New Deal and perfected during the Cold War. The rise of the Social Gospel movement under Theodore Roosevelt redefined Christianity as faith concerned with the public good more than personal salvation. Business leaders saw new regulations as a threat to their bottom lines and looked for help redefining their roles. The author credits three men and their movements that helped build "Christian Libertarianism": James Fifield's Spiritual Motivation Group, Abraham Vereide's prayer breakfast meetings and Billy Graham's evangelical revivals. Major corporations, prominent industrialists and business lobbies supported these evangelists, who were promoting free enterprise. Using scare tactics and playing up the links between piety and patriotism, these groups sold faith and freedom. Who would be so foolish as to deny or fight either? As Kruse explains the connections, readers will begin to understand that the rallies to promote church participation and fights for school prayer were basically big business's drive to eliminate the welfare state and labor unions. Throughout the book, the author exposes big money's manipulation of the masses. The religious leaders no doubt had good intentions, but many of them became rich promoting the evils of unions and the dangers of socialism. Beginning with Dwight Eisenhower, Republican presidents continued the fight. Enter Madison Avenue and Hollywood, and the propaganda drive and the sacralization of the state were in full tilt. In a book for readers from both parties, Kruse ably demonstrates how the simple ornamental mottoes "under God" and "In God We Trust," as well as the fight to define America as Christian, were parts of a clever business plan.(Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 2015)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10411421
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1972-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kruse, Kevin Michael
Dewey number
322/.10973
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
BR517
LC item number
.K78 2015
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • New Deal (1933-1939)
  • Christianity and politics
  • Church and state
  • New Deal, 1933-1939
  • Corporations
  • Conservatism
  • Political culture
  • Social conflict
  • HISTORY / United States / 20th Century
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Ideologies / Conservatism & Liberalism
  • RELIGION / Religion, Politics & State
  • HISTORY / Modern / 20th Century
  • Christianity and politics
  • Church and state
  • Conservatism
  • Corporations
  • Political culture
  • Political science
  • Public opinion
  • Religion
  • Social conflict
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
how corporate America invented Christian America
Label
One nation under God : how corporate America invented Christian America, Kevin M. Kruse
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
PART I: Creation -- "Freedom Under God" -- The Great Crusades -- PART II: Consecration -- "Government Under God" -- Pledging Allegiance -- Pitchmen for Piety -- PART III: Conflict -- "Whose Religious Tradition?" -- "Our So-Called Religious Leaders" -- "Which Side Are You On?" -- Epilogue
Control code
1083758
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xvi, 352 pages
Isbn
9780465049493
Isbn Type
(hardback : alkaline paper)
Lccn
2014035883
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780465049493
  • (OCoLC)888557074
Label
One nation under God : how corporate America invented Christian America, Kevin M. Kruse
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
PART I: Creation -- "Freedom Under God" -- The Great Crusades -- PART II: Consecration -- "Government Under God" -- Pledging Allegiance -- Pitchmen for Piety -- PART III: Conflict -- "Whose Religious Tradition?" -- "Our So-Called Religious Leaders" -- "Which Side Are You On?" -- Epilogue
Control code
1083758
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xvi, 352 pages
Isbn
9780465049493
Isbn Type
(hardback : alkaline paper)
Lccn
2014035883
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780465049493
  • (OCoLC)888557074

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