Coverart for item
The Resource Olympic pride, American prejudice : the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Deborah Riley Draper and Travis Thrasher

Olympic pride, American prejudice : the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Deborah Riley Draper and Travis Thrasher

Label
Olympic pride, American prejudice : the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics
Title
Olympic pride, American prejudice
Title remainder
the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics
Statement of responsibility
Deborah Riley Draper and Travis Thrasher
Title variation
Blair Underwood presents
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"Discover the astonishing, inspirational, and largely unknown true story of the eighteen African American athletes who competed in the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games, defying the racism of both Nazi Germany and the Jim Crow South." -- Publisher annotation
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Filmmaker Draper, director of Versailles ’73, and Thrasher (Solitary) offer a stirring companion to the eponymous 2016 documentary about the 18 African-American athletes who competed for the U.S. at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. While Jesse Owens is the best-known name, this work is “the story of the others” who faced prejudice in both Germany and in Jim Crow America, many of whom later served in WWII. The book charts the backgrounds and lives of athletes such as hurdler Tidye Pickett, who won races as an eight-year-old girl in Chicago, and James LuValle, who won medals at the Olympics and later became a celebrated chemist. The narrative builds to the games themselves, with gripping descriptions of the races and an account of how athletes including Dave Albritton, Cornelius Johnson, and Delos Thurber refused to give the Nazi salute in front of Hitler, instead extending “their wrists turned upward and their thumbs slightly cocked down.” Cutting across disciplines, this stirring remembrance of athletes who have long been overshadowed will resonate with anyone interested in the Olympics or the history of civil rights. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed 12/09/2019) (Publishers Weekly, vol 266, issue 50 , p)
  • Jesse Owens wasn't the only black athlete who excelled at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. This group portrait honors the others who helped prove Hitler wrong about white superiority in sports. Eighteen African American athletes—16 men and 2 women—competed at the Berlin Olympics, all overshadowed by Owens' spectacular victories. Without neglecting the star runner and long jumper, this companion to a 2016 movie celebrates the other black members of the American team, most of whom competed in track and field events. As director Draper and veteran author Thrasher (American Omens: The Coming Fight for Faith: A Novel, 2019, etc.) show, many had overcome towering obstacles, including poverty, segregation, and pressure from black newspapers to boycott the Olympics. Whatever their challenges, the 17 lesser-known athletes stayed focused in Berlin, won 10 medals in addition to Owens' four golds, and helped lay to rest Hitler's myth of Aryan supremacy in sports. The authors describe competitors like 400-meter dash gold medalist Archie Williams in undemanding, present-tense prose well suited to a young adult audience: "Archie knows going back to school is a good thing. He will be bettering himself and not sitting around the house and getting into trouble." This approach will hearten booksellers and librarians looking for inspiring, easy-to-read sports books for teenagers, but adult readers may be put off by oversimplified characterizations of Hitler and others: "The Nazi leader has no desire to race or compete. His idea of competition is to defeat his enemies or to make sure they can never line up against him in the first place." Anyone seeking more complex nonfiction about U.S. athletes' challenges in Berlin will find it in Daniel James Brown's bestselling The Boys in the Boat or Andrew Maraniss' recent young adult book Games of Deception. A decent meal for sports-loving teenagers looking for role models but a thin soup for adults. (Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2019)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10847007
Cataloging source
UKMGB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Draper, Deborah Riley
Dewey number
796.4808996073009043
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1971-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Thrasher, Travis
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Olympic Games
  • African American athletes
  • Olympic Games
  • African American athletes
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics
Label
Olympic pride, American prejudice : the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Deborah Riley Draper and Travis Thrasher
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
The girls are fast -- A single inch, a cross on fire -- Discipline and heart -- Determination -- Dashing to the tape -- The underestimated -- Qualified and confident -- Together yet alone -- Defeat -- Do the little things well -- Looking ahead -- The world's fastest man -- The Nazis take control -- Anyone is beatable -- The boycott debate -- Baptism by fire -- Trial and error -- The Olympic "black gang" -- An almost color-blind ocean -- The Olympic spirit and Olympic peace -- Ready, willing, and able for war -- The snub -- The stop -- The sneakers -- The footnote -- The junior -- The Black Panther -- The golden concession -- The team -- Two ladies -- The verdict
Control code
on1129898957
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
388 pages
Isbn
9781501162152
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations (black and white)
System control number
(OCoLC)1129898957
Label
Olympic pride, American prejudice : the untold story of 18 African Americans who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to compete in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Deborah Riley Draper and Travis Thrasher
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
The girls are fast -- A single inch, a cross on fire -- Discipline and heart -- Determination -- Dashing to the tape -- The underestimated -- Qualified and confident -- Together yet alone -- Defeat -- Do the little things well -- Looking ahead -- The world's fastest man -- The Nazis take control -- Anyone is beatable -- The boycott debate -- Baptism by fire -- Trial and error -- The Olympic "black gang" -- An almost color-blind ocean -- The Olympic spirit and Olympic peace -- Ready, willing, and able for war -- The snub -- The stop -- The sneakers -- The footnote -- The junior -- The Black Panther -- The golden concession -- The team -- Two ladies -- The verdict
Control code
on1129898957
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
388 pages
Isbn
9781501162152
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations (black and white)
System control number
(OCoLC)1129898957

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