Coverart for item
The Resource Now you're talking : human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence, Trevor Cox

Now you're talking : human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence, Trevor Cox

Label
Now you're talking : human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence
Title
Now you're talking
Title remainder
human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence
Statement of responsibility
Trevor Cox
Title variation
Now youre talking
Title variation remainder
human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • British acoustic engineer Cox (The Sound Book) channels his enthusiasm about the wonders of sound and the possibilities of artificial intelligence into a slow-building essay collection. “Being able to speak is what makes us human,” Cox writes, before excitedly moving through a miscellany of topics related to the evolutionary development of hearing, innovations in amplifying and recording technology, and evolutionary and cultural responses to accents and other distinguishing features of human speech. The chapter “My Voice Is Me” looks at social factors behind speech characteristics, such as the registers women speak in and speech patterns related to sexual identity. Cox is at his best when discussing where speech and technology overlap, as with his examination of how talking robots capture incidental data from tone-of-voice commands in order to more effectively mimic human speech. The final chapter, one of the book’s finest, deals with computer programs that can construct and recite love poems. Cox proves an affable guide, and his sharp history will give casual science buffs a lot to talk about. (Sept.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 07/30/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 31, p)
  • A lucid look at the science behind human communication. Consider a smartly constructed computer that read every book in the world. Even if it did, writes Cox (Acoustic Engineering/Univ. of Salford; The Sound Book: The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World, 2014), "its knowledge would be incomplete," for the computer would lack a world of cultural context. It would probably not be able to understand most allusions, would certainly not be able to fill in the blanks of the things that human storytellers leave out of their tales, might not parse plays on words, and so forth. That we human speakers and listeners are able to do all these things points to the phenomenal amount of brainpower that underlies communication. The author examines the evolution of the human vocal tract, noting that standing upright lengthened it to produce a great variety of sounds—and adding that there are distinct differences in the pronunciation of short and tall people in pronouncing words such as bit/bet because of vocal tract length, differences that we adjust for without knowing that we're doing so: "the listener subconsciously estimates how long the vocal tract of the speaker is." Just so, speech impediments such as hesitation or stuttering speak to a huge amount of neural processing and misprocessing as well as the implication of genetics, such as the mutation of "FOXP2 on chromosome 7," in making pronunciation difficult for one unfortunate British family. Neural processing, too, makes it possible for us to judge the "authenticity" of a speaker who is reporting some emotion—an authenticity that is too often faked, whether by a politician or a skilled actor. The greatest takeaway from the book is the welcome thought that our best moments as human communicators are in ordinary conversations, "quotidian activity that allows knowledge about how to survive and thrive to be passed between us." There's lots to ponder in Cox's geekily entertaining exploration of how we acquire our voices and understand those of others. (Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10733964
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cox, Trevor J
Dewey number
302.2/242
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
P95
LC item number
.C69 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Oral communication
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING
  • Oral communication
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence
Label
Now you're talking : human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence, Trevor Cox
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 261-295) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Evolution -- The three ages of the voice -- My voice is me -- Vocal charisma -- Electrifying the voice -- All the robots merely players -- Beware, the computers have ears -- Computer love letters
Control code
on1022979600
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First Counterpoint hardcover edition.
Extent
312 pages
Isbn
9781640090798
Lccn
2018015090
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1022979600
Label
Now you're talking : human conversation from the Neanderthals to artificial intelligence, Trevor Cox
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 261-295) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Evolution -- The three ages of the voice -- My voice is me -- Vocal charisma -- Electrifying the voice -- All the robots merely players -- Beware, the computers have ears -- Computer love letters
Control code
on1022979600
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First Counterpoint hardcover edition.
Extent
312 pages
Isbn
9781640090798
Lccn
2018015090
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1022979600

Library Locations

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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