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The Resource Men of war : the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, by Alexander Rose

Men of war : the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, by Alexander Rose

Label
Men of war : the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima
Title
Men of war
Title remainder
the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima
Statement of responsibility
by Alexander Rose
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Sheds light on the experience of the individual soldier by examining three battles which demonstrate the formation of the United States military that people know today and the traditions that have shaped the character of America's armed forces
Writing style
Review
  • Inspired by the experience of the British soldier in John Keegan's The Face of Battle, a classic work of military history, Rose (The American Rifle) looks at three iconic battles in American military history—Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima—through the American soldier's perspective, mining an immense database of secondary and primary sources to relate the experience of battle largely in the words of the soldier participants. Rose takes the reader into the firing line with the smoke and horror of combat. One consistent theme that he illuminates is the constant danger of infantry combat: the risk of death or injury is high, and the wounds, both fatal and non-fatal, are often gruesome. The detailed descriptions of the state of medical support for wounded soldiers is another important focus, and Rose makes the point that medical science, even in the relatively modern battle of Iwo Jima in 1945, was strained by the needs of the wounded. The physiological impact on the survivors of battle is also stressed throughout. Rose's grim, unadorned, yet immensely readable look at battle is a dose of what real war is like, and a good balance to the more common sanitized military history fare. (June) --Staff (Reviewed June 22, 2015) (Publishers Weekly, vol 262, issue 25, p)
  • Journalist Rose's (Washington's Spies; American Rifle ) latest work follows a similar pattern to John Keegan's classic The Face of Battle , for which Rose professes admiration. Relating to its title, Rose's book appropriately focuses on the individual soldier's experiences at Bunker Hill (1775) in the Revolutionary War, Gettysburg (1863) in the Civil War, and Iwo Jima (1945) in World War II: battles chosen because they were iconic rather than decisive. Chapters contain summaries of the events and maneuvers at the relevant battles, interspersed with depictions of those who fought. Some of the details include descriptions of soldiers' backgrounds, professions, and motivations, as well as equipment and supplies such as weapons, clothing, and even food. There is occasional emphasis on biological reactions to combat—heart rates, adrenaline, eye dilation, fatigue, and overall bodily control. In addition to weapons carried and operated on the field, Rose describes resulting wounds in detail along with the fates of those who suffered them, both immediately and in the long term. VERDICT This worthy homage to The Face of Battle puts an American twist on Keegan's formula. Recommended for anyone interested in U.S. military history.— Matthew Wayman, Pennsylvania State Univ. Lib., Schuylkill Haven --Matthew Wayman (Reviewed May 1, 2015) (Library Journal, vol 140, issue 8, p90)
  • /* Starred Review */ A close look at three of the iconic battles in American history, as experienced by the men on the front lines. In the introduction, Rose (American Rifle: A Biography, 2008, etc.) writes that John Keegan's The Face of Battle (1976) inspired him to write an American version of the same theme. The three battles chosen show the changing nature of warfare. Rose is skeptical of the concept that there is a universal experience of war, arguing that each era has its own ways of fighting and its own codes of military conduct. For each battle, the author draws on the accounts of ordinary soldiers to build the larger picture in mosaic fashion. At Bunker Hill, American militia went up against British regulars. Rose shows that the British were overconfident, while the militiamen had leaders experienced in the French and Indian War and plenty of time drilling. At Gettysburg, two seasoned armies were opposed. By the military doctrine of the day, emphasizing the frontal attack, Robert E. Lee's army was almost obligated to assault the Union lines. At the same time, soldiers in a failed assault were allowed to surrender with honor, unlike their ancestors at Bunker Hill. Iwo Jima, the longest battle profiled here, produced a devastating body count on both sides. The U.S. Marines and their Japanese opponents gave no quarter; few Japanese survived the battle, and the Marines took losses that would have dissuaded almost any other body of men. Rose builds up a detailed picture of each of these battles, sparing few gritty details and romanticizing almost nothing. He writes vividly and memorably, with a good eye for the telling detail or anecdote as well as big-picture perspectives. It's particularly enlightening to have his detailed examinations of Bunker Hill and Iwo Jima, which have received far less attention from military historians than Gettysburg—but even that account benefits from the larger context in which this book places it. A highly recommended addition to the literature of military history.(Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2015)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10429196
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rose, Alexander
Dewey number
355.00973
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Battles
  • Combat
  • Soldiers
  • Battles
  • Combat
  • Soldiers
  • United States
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima
Label
Men of war : the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, by Alexander Rose
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 425-453) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Bunker Hill, 1775. The battle ; The redoubt, part one ; The beach ; The rail fence ; The redoubt, part two ; The wounded and the dead ; Aftermath -- Gettysburg, 1863. Combat in the Civil War ; The machine breaks down: the reality of combat ; The battle ; Marching to Gettysburg ; Skirmishing ; Artillery versus artillery ; Artillery versus infantry ; Infantry versus infantry : the attack ; Infantry versus infantry : the defense ; The attack continues ; The critical moment ; Holding the line ; At close quarters ; Surrender ; The return to normal ; Sights, sounds, smells ; The dead ; The wounded -- Iwo Jima, 1945. The nature of the battle ; The strategy ; The battle ; The landing ; The beach ; The nights ; The madness in the method ; Understanding hearts and minds ; The method in the madness ; The Japanese defensive system ; Adapt or die ; Minefields and antitank weapons ; Spider traps and snipers ; Pillboxes, bunkers, blockhouses ; The caves ; Surrendering and prisoners ; After the battle -- The great red god
Control code
1100408
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
x, 480 pages
Isbn
9780553805185
Isbn Type
(Hardcover)
Lccn
2014030958
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780553805185
  • (OCoLC)885313615
Label
Men of war : the American soldier in combat at Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, by Alexander Rose
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 425-453) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Bunker Hill, 1775. The battle ; The redoubt, part one ; The beach ; The rail fence ; The redoubt, part two ; The wounded and the dead ; Aftermath -- Gettysburg, 1863. Combat in the Civil War ; The machine breaks down: the reality of combat ; The battle ; Marching to Gettysburg ; Skirmishing ; Artillery versus artillery ; Artillery versus infantry ; Infantry versus infantry : the attack ; Infantry versus infantry : the defense ; The attack continues ; The critical moment ; Holding the line ; At close quarters ; Surrender ; The return to normal ; Sights, sounds, smells ; The dead ; The wounded -- Iwo Jima, 1945. The nature of the battle ; The strategy ; The battle ; The landing ; The beach ; The nights ; The madness in the method ; Understanding hearts and minds ; The method in the madness ; The Japanese defensive system ; Adapt or die ; Minefields and antitank weapons ; Spider traps and snipers ; Pillboxes, bunkers, blockhouses ; The caves ; Surrendering and prisoners ; After the battle -- The great red god
Control code
1100408
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
x, 480 pages
Isbn
9780553805185
Isbn Type
(Hardcover)
Lccn
2014030958
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780553805185
  • (OCoLC)885313615

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Yarborough BranchBorrow it
      2200 Hancock Dr., Austin, TX, 78756, US
      30.3234684 -97.74072129999999
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