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The Resource Madison's gift : five partnerships that built America, David O. Stewart

Madison's gift : five partnerships that built America, David O. Stewart

Label
Madison's gift : five partnerships that built America
Title
Madison's gift
Title remainder
five partnerships that built America
Statement of responsibility
David O. Stewart
Title variation
  • Five partnerships that built America
  • 5 partnerships that built America
  • Madisons gift
Title variation remainder
five partnerships that built America
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Historian David O. Stewart restores James Madison, sometimes overshadowed by his fellow Founders, to his proper place as the most significant framer of the new nation. Short, plain, balding, neither soldier nor orator, low on charisma and high on intelligence, Madison cared more about achieving results than taking the credit. To reach his lifelong goal of a self-governing constitutional republic, he blended his talents with those of key partners. It was Madison who led the drive for the Constitutional Convention and pressed for an effective new government as his patron George Washington lent the effort legitimacy; Madison who wrote the Federalist Papers with Alexander Hamilton to secure the Constitution's ratification; Madison who corrected the greatest blunder of the Constitution by drafting and securing passage of the Bill of Rights with Washington's support; Madison who joined Thomas Jefferson to found the nation's first political party and move the nation toward broad democratic principles; Madison, with James Monroe, who guided the new nation through its first war in 1812, really its Second War of Independence; and it was Madison who handed the reins of government to the last of the Founders, his old friend and sometime rival Monroe. These were the main characters in his life. But it was his final partnership that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights. Dolley was the woman he married in middle age and who presided over both him and an enlivened White House. This partnership was a love story, a unique one that sustained Madison through his political rise, his presidency, and a fruitful retirement"--
Writing style
Review
  • “Students of American history often neglect Madison,” writes historian and novelist Stewart (The Lincoln Deception ) in an inauspicious start—it’s a strange, and arguably inaccurate, generalization—to an otherwise solid work on the great constitutional thinker and fourth president of the U.S. Hitting a surer stride, Stewart examines the man from a fresh angle, looking at the ways in which Madison’s associations with George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and his wife, Dolley, helped create the United States. It’s a gimmick of sorts, for Stewart has to justify yet another book on Madison in a period that has seen an explosion of biographies and studies of this founding father—as well as an increase in the number of institutions with Madison in their names (mostly on the political right, where Alexander Hamilton used to prevail). Nevertheless, Stewart illuminates much about the history-making relationships among these celebrated figures that in other books might remain obscured. Readers of history are in good hands with this dependable guide, which approaches its subject with a smooth, easygoing style. Agent: Will Lippincott, Lippincott Massie McQuilkin. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed December 8, 2014) (Publishers Weekly, vol 261, issue 51, p)
  • The early years of the United States were marked with dysfunction, as the country's founding fathers worked to craft a new nation. A primary architect of the constitutional republic that emerged from that turbulent era was James Madison (1751–1836). Stewart (American Emperor ) credits Madison's success in promoting his political ideas to his ability to form strategic partnerships in challenging times with George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and Dolley Madison. In making his case for the benefits to Madison of forming partnerships with others for the common good, especially as it pertained to the men, the author somewhat diminishes his subject's extraordinary intellectual gifts. For instance, the success of Madison's Virginia Plan as the model for the Constitution was not dependent on Washington. While Hamilton authored some of the "Federalist Papers," Madison was responsible for the majority and based his arguments on his views of Republicanism. VERDICT This eminently readable work is recommended for lay readers and should be considered alongside Lynne Cheney's James Madison . [See Prepub Alert, 8/22/14.]— John R. Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY --John R. Burch (Reviewed January 1, 2015) (Library Journal, vol 140, issue 1, p116)
  • A fond portrait of the mild-mannered Virginian and implacable advocate for the young American government.Historian and novelist Stewart (The Lincoln Deception, 2013, etc.) offers a pertinent lesson on Madison's ability to forge working bonds with other founding members of the new American government, even if they did not always see eye to eye. Discreet, generous and nonegotistical, unlike others who hammered out the documents that framed the new government, Madison refused to take credit, rather conceding the "work of many hands and many heads" in the forging of the Constitution. Small and soft-spoken, he was overshadowed by the more dynamic personalities of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton and James Monroe, yet the complement of their respective qualities resulted in brilliant working relationships during the course of Madison's political career. Hamilton and Madison, both in their 30s, recognized that the Articles of Confederation were inadequate for managing the new nation and had to be replaced by a stronger national government. Their energy as "impatient young men" galvanized the other delegates in Philadelphia over "framing a system which we wish to last for ages," while their dozens of newspaper essays (written with John Jay) explaining the Constitutional structure became the incomparable work of political theory, The Federalist Papers. Madison cleverly used the power and prestige of Gen. Washington in consolidating attendance at the Convention and winning votes for the Bill of Rights, and the two largely struck the deal to build a new capital on the Potomac. In Jefferson, Madison found an intellectual kindred spirit and lifelong friend. Monroe served in Jefferson's and Madison's administrations and navigated the Louisiana Purchase and renewed hostility with Britain. Finally, the woman and helpmate Madison found late in life, Dolley, evolved into a winning "Lady Presidentess" and devoted caretaker in his dotage at Montpelier. Stewart's lively character sketches employ sprightly prose and impeccable research.(Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 2014)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10395942
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Stewart, David O
Dewey number
  • 973.5/1092
  • B
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Madison, James
  • Madison, James
  • Madison, James
  • Madison, James
  • Presidents
  • Statesmen
  • Friendship
  • United States
  • United States
  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Presidents & Heads of State
  • HISTORY / United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Ideologies / General
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
five partnerships that built America
Label
Madison's gift : five partnerships that built America, David O. Stewart
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
The end of the beginning -- Part I: Alexander Hamilton. Impatient young men ; A powerful effect on our destiny ; A system to last for ages ; Creating the Federalist ; Ratification battles -- Part II: George Washington. Courting the General ; Starting from scratch ; Not altogether useless ; The deal -- Part III: Jefferson. First, friendship ; The Hamilton problem ; Becoming Republicans ; Party warrior ; No time for qualms -- Part IV: James Monroe. Friends and rivals and friends ; Distant diplomacy ; The rupture ; Reclaiming a friend ; The Republican way of war ; Near to a miracle -- Part V: Dolley. All things to all men ; The lady presidentess ; Adam and Eve at Montpelier ; The constitutional sage of Montpelier ; "A sad blot on our free country" ; Farewells.
Control code
ocn883146752
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
viii, 419 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781451688580
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2014021393
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, portraits, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)883146752
Label
Madison's gift : five partnerships that built America, David O. Stewart
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
The end of the beginning -- Part I: Alexander Hamilton. Impatient young men ; A powerful effect on our destiny ; A system to last for ages ; Creating the Federalist ; Ratification battles -- Part II: George Washington. Courting the General ; Starting from scratch ; Not altogether useless ; The deal -- Part III: Jefferson. First, friendship ; The Hamilton problem ; Becoming Republicans ; Party warrior ; No time for qualms -- Part IV: James Monroe. Friends and rivals and friends ; Distant diplomacy ; The rupture ; Reclaiming a friend ; The Republican way of war ; Near to a miracle -- Part V: Dolley. All things to all men ; The lady presidentess ; Adam and Eve at Montpelier ; The constitutional sage of Montpelier ; "A sad blot on our free country" ; Farewells.
Control code
ocn883146752
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
viii, 419 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781451688580
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2014021393
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, portraits, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)883146752

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