Coverart for item
The Resource Lucia, Lucia : a novel, Adriana Trigiani

Lucia, Lucia : a novel, Adriana Trigiani

Label
Lucia, Lucia : a novel
Title
Lucia, Lucia
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
Adriana Trigiani
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The daughter of an Italian immigrant family in 1950 Greenwich Village, Lucia Sartori pursues a career in the fashion industry until she falls in love with a handsome stranger, who must win over her traditional family to marry her
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • The author of the Big Stone Gap trilogy (Big Stone Gap, 2000; Big Cherry Holler, 2001; Milk Glass Moon, 2002) changes venues from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia to New York City's Greenwich Village. What has not changed is Trigiani's heartfelt depiction of homespun characters whose emotions are always very close to the surface. When aspiring playwright Kit Zanetti agrees to have tea with her dignified 70-year-old neighbor, Lucia Sartori, she does so out of politeness; hours later, however, she has been treated to a vivid depiction of life on Commerce Street during the 1950s. The daughter of an Italian grocer, Lucia worked for high-end department store B. Altman's as a custom seamstress. Her love for beautiful things draws her away from her childhood sweetheart and into the arms of a suave bon vivant, who takes her to posh nightclubs and fine restaurants but eventually breaks her heart. Trigiani offers an inviting picture of Italian family life as well as a finely detailed appreciation of Old World craftsmanship, whether it be clothing or cooking. -- Joanne Wilkinson (BookList, September 1, 2003, p62)
  • Adult/High School –Budding playwright Kit Zanetti is invited to tea by her elderly neighbor, and she is amazed at the apartment full of memorabilia. Her question about a beautiful full-length mink coat begins the story of "Aunt Lu's" long and interesting life. Lucia Sartori, the youngest child and only daughter of a prosperous Italian grocer in Greenwich Village in the early '50s, is engaged to marry her childhood sweetheart, Dante DiMartino. Almost on the eve of the wedding, Lucia is shocked to learn that his mother expects her to quit her job as a seamstress at B. Altman's department store to stay at home and help her future mother-in-law and to prepare for the children she is expected to have. Lucia resents having to choose between career and marriage, so she breaks the engagement. Later, she meets suave and debonair John Talbot, who sweeps her off her feet. He gives her a beautiful, full-length mink coat. Only after being jilted at the altar does Lucia learn that he is a con man. After this unfortunate event, Lucia's plans to go to California to pursue her career are thwarted when her mother becomes ill. Now she must decide between love and duty or her own happiness. Finely drawn characters move the story along with warmth and humor, relationships in Lucia's big Italian family are lovingly detailed, and there is a strong sense of place. Readers who enjoyed Trigiani's "Big Stone Gap" trilogy (Random) will find that she again tells an engaging story.–Carol Clark, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA --Carol Clark (Reviewed December 1, 2003) (School Library Journal, vol 49, issue 12, p176)
  • Greenwich Village is a far cry from the rural Virginia of Trigiani's best-selling trilogy (Big Stone Gap ; Big Cherry Holler ; Milk Glass Moon ), but the emotional terrain covered in the author's first novel is warmly familiar. Poignant and feeling, it looks back on the experiences of the beautiful daughter of an Italian-American family in Greenwich Village in the early '50s. Kit Zanetti, a young playwright in present-day New York, accepts an invitation to the apartment of "Aunt Lu," as she is known in their building. Aunt Lu on first glance is an eccentric lady in her 70s who trails around in a fur. Once Kit can be bothered to listen, however, she finds out that Aunt Lu was once the most beautiful girl in Greenwich Village, Lucia Sartori, an intelligent and ambitious seamstress in the custom department at B. Altman's, who's determined not to let the traditions of her loving family lock her into the patterns of the past. When her impending marriage to childhood sweetheart Dante threatens just that, she refuses him, startling her beloved family. Then, fatefully, she meets the dapper John Talbot, who seems the man of her dreams, even draping her in full-length mink, and she ignores the signs that he is trouble and plans marriage. Jilted on her wedding day, Lucia finds out that he is a con man. Despite her pain, she decides to go to California to follow her dream, but when her mother falls ill she does exactly what she was trying to avoid: she becomes the maiden aunt and caretaker of the Sartori clan. Will some well-meant meddling by Kit disarray Lucia's carefully controlled life? This old-fashioned drama wears its heart on its sleeve—subtlety is not its strong suit—but readers will laugh with and weep for Lucia and her lost dreams. 10-city author tour. (July) --Staff (Reviewed July 7, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 27, p54)
  • Trigiani here leaves the rural Virginia setting of her "Big Stone Gap" trilogy for New York City. Kit, an aspiring playwright, agrees to afternoon tea with "Aunt" Lu, an old, but still elegant, fellow tenant. Kit's casual question about Lu's frequently worn mink coat is rewarded by the story of two pivotal years in Lucia Sartori's life. For the bulk of the novel, we are swept back to Greenwich Village in the early 1950s, where we meet Lucia's family. Beautiful and talented Lucia, who works in the custom dress shop at B. Altman's, wants to retain her maiden name after marriage, continue in a nonfamily business, and delay having children, all taboo for an Italian Catholic. Then she meets the irresistible John Talbot, and Lucia's happy life seems destined to unravel. Trigiani creates a compelling story, artfully uniting a snapshot of the past with the present. This bittersweet novel should have broad appeal. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 3/1/03.]—Rebecca Sturm Kelm, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights --Rebecca Sturm Kelm (Reviewed May 15, 2003) (Library Journal, vol 128, issue 9, p127)
  • More like a big, sloppy wet kiss to Greenwich Village than anything as mundane and unromantic as a novel: Trigiani's fourth (after Milk Glass Moon, 2002, etc.) starts off in extremely unpromising territory but thankfully doesn't stick with it for long.Narrator Kit is a flighty writer of universally rejected plays and an occasional journalist who lives in the Village and is given to mundane reflections on just how wonderful her neighborhood is. Fortunately, she doesn't have much of a life, so when her neighbor—a charming, gracious old lady everyone calls Aunt Lu—invites her in for some tea and ends up telling Kit the story of her life, Kit has no good reason to say no. In the early 1950s, Lucia Sartori lived with her large Italian family in the Village, where her father and brother ran the beloved Groceria food market. Lucia herself, still in her 20s and considered the neighborhood beauty, worked in the custom clothing section in the grand B.Altman's department store on Fifth Avenue and was engaged to the most promising bachelor around, Dante DeMartino. Spunky Lucia, though, breaks the engagement when she discovers that the DeMartinos expect her to leave work and live with them as a cleaning, cooking, baby-producing housewife. It isn't long before Lucia gets snapped up by John Talbot, a rakishly handsome man-about-town who's vaguely employed in the importing business (alarm bells clang in everyone's head, except for that of the normally bright Lucia). Trigiani is mostly interested in Lucia's relationships with her coworkers and family, only intermittently cutting back to her blossoming romance with John. But she knows how to deliver on basic desires: her story is filled-to-bursting with gorgeous clothes, sumptuous meals, beautiful weather, and the rhapsody of New York City. Where it runs into problems is with its humans: solidly depicted but never quite lifelike.Silly but romantic stuff, written in a state of never-ending swoon. (Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2003)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
119367
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Trigiani, Adriana
Dewey number
813/.54
Index
no index present
Interest level
UG
Literary form
fiction
Reading level
4.8
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Italian American families
  • Italian American women
  • Department stores
  • Department stores
  • Domestic fiction
  • Italian American families
  • Italian American women
  • Greenwich Village (New York, N.Y.)
  • New York (State)
Label
Lucia, Lucia : a novel, Adriana Trigiani
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
454825
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
263 pages
Isbn
9781400060054
Lccn
2003046612
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Specific material designation
regular print
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781400060054
  • (OCoLC)51983441
Label
Lucia, Lucia : a novel, Adriana Trigiani
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
454825
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
263 pages
Isbn
9781400060054
Lccn
2003046612
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Specific material designation
regular print
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781400060054
  • (OCoLC)51983441

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • St. John BranchBorrow it
      7500 Blessing Ave., Austin, TX, 78752, US
      30.3328231 -97.6937014
    • University Hills BranchBorrow it
      4701 Loyola Ln., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3093017 -97.6664785
Processing Feedback ...