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The Resource Little Scarlet, Walter Mosley

Little Scarlet, Walter Mosley

Label
Little Scarlet
Title
Little Scarlet
Statement of responsibility
Walter Mosley
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Mosley returns to top form in this ninth installment of his celebrated Easy Rawlins series. In the early volumes, the calendar moved ahead almost one decade per book, but Mosley has been lingering through the 1960s--rightfully so, given the far-reaching impact of that turbulent era on African American life. Here it’s the last days of the Watts riots in 1966, and a black woman, nicknamed Little Scarlet, has been found murdered in her apartment, the same building that an unidentified white man appeared to enter after escaping a mob of rioters. Did the white man commit the murder? The LAPD wants answers quickly, which is why Rawlins is asked to investigate. As has been the case throughout this series, the mystery at hand serves as a window opening on a historical moment. As Easy investigates, he finds himself forced to make sense of his own contrary feelings about the riots--his sadness at the loss of life and property in his community set against his recognition of inevitability, of the fact that the riots were expressing out in the open the anger every black man and woman had been forced to hide: “Now it’s said and nothing will ever be the same. That’s good for us, no matter what we lost. And it could be good for white people, too.” Mosley remains a master at showing his readers slices of history from the inside, from a perspective that is all those things history usually isn’t: intimate, individual, and passionate. -- Bill Ott (BookList, 05-01-2004, p1516)
  • /* Starred Review */ Set during the Watts riots of 1965, this eighth entry in Mosley's acclaimed Easy Rawlins series (Bad Boy Brawly Brown , etc.) demonstrates the reach and power of the genre, combining a deeply involving mystery with vigorous characterizations and probing commentary about race relations in America. Easy Rawlins, 45, is—like the rest of black L.A.—angry: "the angry voice in my heart that urged me to go out and fight after all the hangings I had seen, after all of the times I had been called nigger and all of the doors that had been slammed in my face." But Easy stays out of the fiery streets until a white cop and his bosses recruit him to identify the murderer of a young black woman, Nola Payne; the cops suspect an unidentified white man whom Nola sheltered during the riots, and are worried that if they pursue the case, word will leak and the riots will escalate. Easy, an unlicensed PI who also works as a school custodian, agrees to investigate, drawing into his quest several series regulars, including the stone killer Mouse, the magical healer Mama Jo and his own family. There's also a sexy young woman whose allure, like that of the violent streets, threatens to smash the life of integrity he has so carefully built. In time, Easy focuses on a homeless black man as the killer, not only of Nola but of perhaps 20 other black women, all of whom had hooked up with white men. This is Mosley's best novel to date: the plot is streamlined and the language simple yet strong, allowing the serpentine story line to support Easy's amazingly complex character and hypnotic narration as Mosley plunges us into his world and, by extension, the world of all blacks in white-run America. Fierce, provocative, expertly entertaining, this is genre writing at its finest. (July 5) Forecast: Strong reviews, Mosley's rep and word of mouth will get this title onto lists quickly; a 30-city author tour will add lift. Expect this to be Mosley's biggest seller yet . --Staff (Reviewed May 24, 2004) (Publishers Weekly, vol 251, issue 21, p47)
  • /* Starred Review */ The raw treatment of blacks in America, which has simmered beneath the surface of Mosley's Easy Rawlins novels and came to a low bubble in Bad Boy Brawley Brown , here erupts to a full boil. Set during the 1965 Watts riots, the eighth book in the series finds Easy, now 45, as he is recruited by the LAPD to investigate a murder in that combat-zone neighborhood. With a letter from the deputy police commissioner giving him carte blanche, Easy semipartners with his street crew of Rawlins regulars and LAPD Detective Melvin Suggs to work both sides of the law to unearth the identity of what proves to be a serial killer. Beyond the backdrop of the riots, the question of color is intricately and masterfully woven into the fabric of the story without overwhelming the mystery. The pervading theme here is change, in both the community and the core characters, and the novel's conclusion is perhaps indicative that this installment is a turning point in the series. Mosley's hot streak continues with Little Scarlet , the best Easy novel in years. Highly recommended. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 3/15/04; see Q&A with Mosley on p. 107.]—Michael Rogers, Library Journal --Michael Rogers (Reviewed June 1, 2004) (Library Journal, vol 129, issue 10, p108)
  • /* Starred Review */ Easy Rawlins sizzles as Watts burns.The official death toll in the 1966 Watts riots is 33, but the LAPD is keeping a 34th fatality quiet. The victim is red-haired Nola Payne, a.k.a. Li'l Scarlet, strangled and then shot after she rescued a white man who'd been rousted from his car by an opportunistic thief. Det. Melvin Suggs and Deputy Commissioner Gerald Jordan don't say it in so many words, but the cops who drive the streets hassling loners are scared to go door-to-door asking questions while storefronts are still smoldering. So Easy accepts a paper from Jordan authorizing him to investigate. As usual, Easy isn't much of a detective—his inquiries lead to a chain of suspicious characters who finger one another—but he could hardly be improved as a philosopher and aphorist. Recognizing early on that the official response to the riots, enlisting subservient black men into the oppressive ranks of white officialdom and cracking down on the rest, marks "the beginning of the breakup of our community," Easy, who's "never willingly said anything intelligent" to a white man, follows a trail of ill-fated souls who've sought to cross racial divides till he finds the most tortured killer of his checkered career (Six Easy Pieces, 2003, etc.).The real strength of Easy's narrative, though, is his unflinching recognition that in working with the police, he's crossing the same border that's driven his brothers and sisters to violence. (Kirkus Reviews, June 1, 2004)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
124640
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mosley, Walter
Index
no index present
Interest level
UG
Literary form
fiction
Reading level
4.5
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Easy Rawlins mysteries
Series volume
0009
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rawlins, Easy (Fictitious character)
  • Private investigators
  • African American men
  • Los Angeles (Calif.)
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
an Easy Rawlins mystery
Label
Little Scarlet, Walter Mosley
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
481216
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
306 pages
Isbn
9780316073035
Lccn
2003023002
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780316073035
Label
Little Scarlet, Walter Mosley
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
481216
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
306 pages
Isbn
9780316073035
Lccn
2003023002
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(Sirsi) i9780316073035

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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