Coverart for item
The Resource Little Owl's day, by Divya Srinivasan

Little Owl's day, by Divya Srinivasan

Label
Little Owl's day
Title
Little Owl's day
Statement of responsibility
by Divya Srinivasan
Title variation
Little Owls day
Creator
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Little Owl explores the forest at daytime after being woken up by a noisy squirrel
Writing style
Illustration
Review
  • Preschool-Kindergarten Little Owl is familiar with the moon, but when he wakes up in the middle of the day, he sees . . . the sun! Daytime is a whole new world: wrens trilling, bees buzzing, and lots of things in the day remind him of the night. Are those moths? Nope, butterflies. The bright, stylized digital artwork has the look of collage and captures the appeal of the natural world, especially the frolicking animals, from wolf pups to a slow-moving turtle. A bear, who has always wanted to show Little Owl a rainbow, gets his chance, and the book ends with night falling and Little Owl showing Bear the moon. This is a worthy companion to Little Owl’s Night (2011), and the bold, eye-catching artwork will work equally well with kids in groups or kids on laps. -- Cooper, Ilene (Reviewed 11-01-2014) (Booklist, vol 111, number 5)
  • PreS-K — In this companion book to Little Owl's Night (Viking, 2011), a squirrel's chittering wakes Little Owl, affording him an opportunity to experience his forest world in daylight for the first time. Wrens, so silent at night, are "trilling sweetly"; butterflies and bees flutter among the flowers covering the forest floor; dragonflies fly backwards as they skim along the pond. Turtle, closed in her shell at night, now suns herself on the rocks. Yes, the forest is indeed a different and magical place during the day. Yet another wonder awaits Little Owl when his friend Bear, now awake and hunting fish, shows him a beautiful rainbow. The large, flat illustrations, all spreads, depict a cheery forest habitat in varying shades of blue and green and enlivened with colorful insects and other forest creatures. Little Owl, with his squat body and huge black-green eyes, hovers over most spreads, taking everything in. As day begins to fold into night and the sky darkens to blue-black, he shares his adventures with the night creatures that begin to appear. And before he catches up on his much-needed sleep, the little bird has a wonder to show Bear, too—the newly risen moon. Young readers will enjoy following Little Owl on his explorations, and this story, paired with Ashley Wolff's Baby Bear Sees Blue (S. & S., 2012), can instill in them a sense of wonder at the natural world.—Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT --Marianne Saccardi (Reviewed July 1, 2014) (School Library Journal, vol 60, issue 7, p77)
  • In this sequel to Srinivasan's debut picture book, Little Owl's Night (2011), the little owl explores the unfamiliar territory of the daytime world.His big black eyes almost pop out of his head as he sees the sun for the first time and all the wonderful things it illuminates: birds, flowers, bees and butterflies—which he at first mistakes for moths, his only prior experience of winged insects. In this sparkling new world, dragonflies skim over the water, snakes slide and glide, turtles sun themselves beside the pond, and wolf pups play in the sunshine. Little Owl's old friend, Bear, is awake now, ready to show the little bird the beauty of a shimmering rainbow over a waterfall. As the sun sets and the moon rises, the world becomes more familiar to the little owl, although there are still some surprises, such as the discovery that a friendly bunny lives in a burrow right underneath his treetop home. At last he is able to fulfill his dream of showing Bear the moon. The tiny owl flits through richly colored landscapes populated with graceful, stylized renderings of the animals and birds. Through carefully controlled application of color washes and linear patterns, Srinivasan conveys the magic of a fantasy world that will delight very young children and their caregivers.A welcome return for Little Owl. (Picture book. 2-6)(Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2014)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10355444
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Srinivasan, Divya
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Interest level
LG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 0
Reading level
2.3
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Owls
  • Bedtime
  • Forests and forestry
  • Forest animals
  • Owls
  • Bedtime
  • Forests and forestry
  • Forest animals
Target audience
preschool
Label
Little Owl's day, by Divya Srinivasan
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
1051957
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780670016501
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2013047053
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780670016501
  • (OCoLC)865543879
Label
Little Owl's day, by Divya Srinivasan
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
1051957
Dimensions
28 cm
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780670016501
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2013047053
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780670016501
  • (OCoLC)865543879

Library Locations

    • Spicewood Springs BranchBorrow it
      8637 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78759, US
      30.4337083 -97.7730809
    • Windsor Park BranchBorrow it
      5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3116523 -97.6902298
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