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The Resource I'm still here : black dignity in a world made for whiteness, Austin Channing Brown

I'm still here : black dignity in a world made for whiteness, Austin Channing Brown

Label
I'm still here : black dignity in a world made for whiteness
Title
I'm still here
Title remainder
black dignity in a world made for whiteness
Statement of responsibility
Austin Channing Brown
Title variation
I am still here
Title variation remainder
Black dignity in a world made for whiteness
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The author's first encounter with a racialized America came at age seven, when her parents told her they named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man. She grew up in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches, and has spent her life navigating America's racial divide as a writer, a speaker, and an expert helping organizations practice genuine inclusion. While so many institutions claim to value diversity in their mission statements, many fall short of matching actions to words. Brown highlights how white middle-class evangelicalism has participated in the rise of racial hostility, and encourages the reader to confront apathy and recognize God's ongoing work in the world
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ This incisive memoir takes a penetrating look at race and the Christian faith while providing tools on how to cope with microaggressions and blatant racism. Brown perfectly and succinctly describes the corrosive weight of white supremacy embedded within American institutions, which African Americans and other people of color endure on a daily basis in schools, professional spaces, and places of worship. Brown's experiences and lifelong exploration of racial understanding and reconciliation offer a modern take on the double consciousness first written about by W.E.B. DuBois. From her days in elementary school, often as the only person of color in the room, to speaking on the national stage, Brown's lessons not only give allies the tools to do better but also provide advice for peers and up-and-comings on navigating hostile workplaces, lecture halls, and hearts and minds. This book is laced with gems that make it necessary reading for everyone, regardless of belief or identity. VERDICT Fans of Ta-Nehisi Coates's Between the World and Me and Reni Eddo-Lodge's Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race will find this candid debut edifying and essential.—Christina Vortia, Hype Lit, Land O'Lakes, FL --Christina Vortia (Reviewed 03/01/2019) (School Library Journal, vol 65, issue 2, p121)
  • /* Starred Review */ In this powerful book, Brown is up front about her exhaustion with white people as she meticulously details the experience of being a black woman in modern American society. After explaining that her parents named her Austin so that potential employers would “assume you are a white man,” she recreates a typical interview and first few months at a new job: “Every pair of eyes looks at me in surprise.... Should they have known? Am I now more impressive or less impressive?... It would be comical if it wasn’t so damn disappointing.” In clear prose, she relates anecdotes to shed light on racial injustices that are systematically reinforced by the standards of white society. Brown, a Christian, believes the history of American Christianity is deeply intertwined with race relations and that Christian communities need to play a large role in racial reconciliation. Explaining that change needs to come from acknowledgement of systemic inequalities, Brown calls on readers to live their professed ideals rather than simply state them. Though the writing style can be preachy, Brown’s authoritative tone and moving message make this a must-read for those interested in racial justice within the Christian community. (May.) --Staff (Reviewed 03/26/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 13, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Among the most extreme experiences described here by writer and speaker Brown (Christianity Today) are college visits to a plantation and a lynching museum, during which tour guides explained that slaves were happy and better looked after than slaves in other places. On another occasion, a white woman tells her that "I really had no idea that slavery was on purpose." These events and the many mundane brutalities Brown regularly endures make her wonder who is being helped by the idea of racial reconciliation in America. The movement toward diversity and forgiveness, the author points out, too often involves white people seeking credit for recognizing the crimes of the past even as they do nothing to fix things today, and black people being required to provide endless absolution and information while calmly enduring dignity-eroding and rage-inducing injustices. Amid the frankly told, well-written accounts of Brown's daily life as a professional in a Christian organization are "Interludes" that will help black women in her situation, notably "How To Survive Racism in an Organization That Claims To Be Antiracist." VERDICT A must-read for black and white women especially, but of value to everyone. --Henrietta Verma (Reviewed 04/15/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 7, p82)
  • The impassioned story of one woman's journey into activism. Brown's book is part memoir and part jeremiad against American whiteness. She begins by describing her youth in a largely white neighborhood of Toledo. After her parents' divorce, she went on to discover black culture, and affirm her own identity, in an African-American Cleveland neighborhood and, especially, in a black church. Through high school and then into college, Brown learned more about black history and culture and became more involved with racial reconciliation efforts. She especially saw herself as a possible bridge between black and white cultures. Most of her work has been through churches and progressive Christian organizations, but faith plays only a minor role in this book. The focus of the narrative is on the author's recognition of—and fight against—"America's commitment to violent, abusive, exploitative, immoral white supremacy, which seeks the absolute control of Black bodies." Brown pulls no punches as she lambasts white culture for being, even at its most liberal, myopic and self-serving. She argues that "white fragility" and "white guilt" are ways in which whites absolve themselves of inherent racism. Discussing whites who, after her presentations on racism, confess to her their own racist opinions and actions, she points out that she cannot "offer absolution....I am not a priest for the white soul." Throughout the book, the author writes with raw emotion and candid self-reflection. "I have become very intimate with anger," she writes. Brown's work will resonate with other activists of color, though it provides little direction for others. The author is clear that racism and white supremacy are here to stay and that even attempts to educate and enlighten are rarely fruitful. "I underestimated the enduring power, the lethal imagination, the desire for blood of white supremacy," she writes. And later: "hope for me has died one thousand deaths." A powerful and necessarily uncomfortable text lacking suggestions for a path forward. (Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2018)
Biography type
autobiography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10662170
Cataloging source
PNX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brown, Austin Channing
Dewey number
  • 305.896/073092
  • B
Index
no index present
LC call number
E185.615
LC item number
.B7335 2018
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Brown, Austin Channing
  • African American women political activists
  • African American Christians
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Black dignity in a world made for whiteness
Label
I'm still here : black dignity in a world made for whiteness, Austin Channing Brown
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
White people are exhausting -- Playing spades -- The other side of harmony -- Ain't no friends here -- Whiteness at work -- Interlude: Why I love being a black girl -- White fragility -- Nice white people -- The story we tell -- Creative anger -- Interlude: How to survive racism in an organization that claims to be antiracist -- The ritual of fear -- A God for the accused -- We're still here -- Interlude: A letter to my son -- Justice, then reconciliation -- Standing in the shadow of hope
Control code
on1034000935
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
185 pages
Isbn
9781524760854
Lccn
bl2018052992
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)1034000935
Label
I'm still here : black dignity in a world made for whiteness, Austin Channing Brown
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
White people are exhausting -- Playing spades -- The other side of harmony -- Ain't no friends here -- Whiteness at work -- Interlude: Why I love being a black girl -- White fragility -- Nice white people -- The story we tell -- Creative anger -- Interlude: How to survive racism in an organization that claims to be antiracist -- The ritual of fear -- A God for the accused -- We're still here -- Interlude: A letter to my son -- Justice, then reconciliation -- Standing in the shadow of hope
Control code
on1034000935
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
185 pages
Isbn
9781524760854
Lccn
bl2018052992
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
(OCoLC)1034000935

Library Locations

    • Carver BranchBorrow it
      1161 Angelina St., Austin, TX, 78702, US
      30.2695584 -97.7240278
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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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      30.4223444 -97.7161692
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      30.2166039 -97.79733689999999
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      30.3529975 -97.7551561
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      30.2486884 -97.76239749999999
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      30.3093017 -97.6664785
    • Windsor Park BranchBorrow it
      5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3116523 -97.6902298
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