The Resource I do not like books anymore!, Daisy Hirst

I do not like books anymore!, Daisy Hirst

Label
I do not like books anymore!
Title
I do not like books anymore!
Statement of responsibility
Daisy Hirst
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Lovable monster siblings Natalie and Alphonse are back with big plans in a second surprisingly touching tale in which Natalie is ready to learn how to read. Natalie and Alphonse REALLY like books. Picture books with Dad, scary stories with Mom, and especially stories they remember or make up themselves. So when it's time for Natalie to learn to read, she thinks it will be exciting -- she can have all the stories in the world now, and even read them to Alphonse. But when Natalie gets her first reading book, the letters look like squiggles and it isn't even a good story; it's just about a cat that can sit. "I do not like books anymore!" Natalie declares. But she still wants to make up stories. With Alphonse's help, can she find a way to turn a love of telling stories into a love of reading stories? With her one-of-a-kind voice and wonderfully droll artwork, Daisy Hirst captures the familiar frustration of struggling to learn something new -- and the particular pride that comes when you finally succeed." -- Amazon.com
Member of
Tone
Illustration
Review
  • Preschool-Grade 2 Like her little sib Alphonse, Natalie loves, loves, loves books and stories, eagerly looking forward to reading by herself. But the words in her first reader just look like “prickles or birds’ feet.” Even when she laboriously puzzles them out with adult help, all she gets is, “The book was about a cat. The cat could sit.” Not even a story! Natalie huffs off to make up stories of her own with Alphonse, and the rest, as they say, is history, because in no time, she’s drawing pictures; getting her dad to pencil in the plotline; and working her way through a rousing, handmade original tale. In what may or may not be a significant bit of visual subtext, Natalie and her parents look like axolotls in Hirst’s blobby screen-printed scenes, but Alphonse and an older relative sport rabbit ears. Natalie’s path to literacy is both fun and valid for other emergent readers, even though drab interest-killers, like the school book she is saddled with, are fortunately rarer than they used to be. -- John Peters (Reviewed 11/29/2018) (Booklist, vol 115, number 6)
  • PreS-Gr 1—Monster siblings Natalie and Alphonse are back. Natalie can't wait to read aloud to Alphonse. She gets her first beginner reading book about a cat. The letters all look like prickles and bird feet. Nothing interesting happens to that cat. It just sits. Natalie decides she doesn't like books anymore and doesn't need to read, ever. Instead, she will make up stories and tell them to Alphonse. He suggests that her story should be in a book with pictures. They draw the pictures, and Natalie dictates the story to their dad as he writes it down. Natalie can mostly read the book they'd written. Primary color and screen-printed illustrations depict the simple yet endearing monsterlike characters. Creative use of thick black lines adds detail and illustrates how Natalie sees letters as bird feet, squiggles, and scratches floating across the page. The thick lines also complement the bold kidlike font, creating child-pleasing typography. New readers will understand Natalie's frustrations. VERDICT The siblings' spirited approach to literacy could also spark inspiration in children to create their own stories and not surrender to prickles and bird feet. An appealing read-aloud for those not quite ready to read on their own.—Mindy Hiatt, Salt Lake County Library Services --Mindy Hiatt (Reviewed 11/01/2018) (School Library Journal, vol 64, issue 11, p58)
  • /* Starred Review */ In this follow-up to Alphonse, That Is Not OK to Do!, siblings Natalie and Alphonse have become heavily invested in the prospect of Natalie learning how to read. Both already avidly consume and make stories. For Natalie, reading independently means having “all the stories in the world, whenever I want them” (she enviously eyes subway riders with reading material), while Alphonse looks forward to sharing the bounty as Natalie’s readaloud audience. But even with help from her teacher, Natalie struggles (“The words looked like prickles or birds’ feet”), and what she can read is a big snooze (“The book was about a cat. The cat could sit”). She’s ready to chuck it all when a remark from Alphonse—whose matter-of-factness makes him a terrific counterpart—opens a pathway back into narrative and print. Straightforward, empathic prose and screen-printed vignettes of biomorphic family life (red Natalie is amphibious-looking; Alphonse resembles a chunky blue rabbit) by Hirst (The Girl With the Parrot on Her Head) reassure while giving an emotionally fraught subject its full, unsentimental due. Natalie and Alphonse would approve. Ages 3–7. (Nov.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 10/01/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 40, p)
  • Monster siblings Alphonse and Natalie (Alphonse, That Is Not OK to Do! 2016) return in a sympathetic story about learning to read. Natalie is excited to go to school and to learn to read. She and her younger brother, Alphonse, love stories, both hearing them and telling them. But when the teacher hands Natalie her first primer, reading seems harder than expected, as "the letters and words looked like prickles or birds' feet." Despite the teacher's encouragement to sound out the words, Natalie is frustrated by the difficulty as well as the absence of a real story in this book about a cat that sits. Practicing eventually gives her mastery of this book, but when Alphonse asks Natalie to read aloud one of his books, the letters and words look "like scuttling insects with too many legs and eyes." Natalie declares, "I DO NOT LIKE BOOKS ANYMORE!" Instead, she decides to take care of her sick elephant, Sinéad, while making up her own more interesting story. Dad helps by writing the words to the pictures she draws with her brother, producing a homemade book she can read again and again. Bold, primary colors against white space create supportive scenes peopled by this lovable family of adorable, Muppet-like monsters eager to nurture some perseverance and full of patience with Natalie's struggle and ultimate accomplishment. Natalie is on her way to reap the pleasures of learning to read, as seen in the endpapers, by authoring her own storybooks, a recognized strategy to foster beginning readers. Learning to read can be hard, and this book offers youngsters tackling the skill needed sympathy. (Picture book. 5-7) (Kirkus Reviews, October 15, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10746858
Cataloging source
YDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hirst, Daisy
Dewey number
[E]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 1
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Natalie and Alphonse books
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Reading
Target audience
preschool
Label
I do not like books anymore!, Daisy Hirst
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
on1026648813
Dimensions
27 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition
Extent
40 unnumbered pages
Isbn
9781536203349
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
colour illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1026648813
Label
I do not like books anymore!, Daisy Hirst
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
on1026648813
Dimensions
27 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition
Extent
40 unnumbered pages
Isbn
9781536203349
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
colour illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1026648813

Library Locations

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