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The Resource Hundred percent, by Karen Romano Young

Hundred percent, by Karen Romano Young

Label
Hundred percent
Title
Hundred percent
Statement of responsibility
by Karen Romano Young
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Christine Gouda, called Tink, and her best friend Jackie are entering sixth grade, and suddenly everything seems awkward and just plain wrong--boys are behaving differently, clothes do not fit the way they should, long term friendships suddenly seem tenuous, and most of all she needs a new nickname because "Tink" just does not fit anymore
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Grades 4-7 Sixth grade seems like the perfect place for reinvention—or self-discovery—for Chris and her BFF Jackie. But their friendship strains as the girls develop at different rates and Jackie is invited into the cool kids’ group. Chris tags along but isn’t sure that’s where she belongs, especially when her crush woofs at her, and her nerdy friend Matthew (aka Bushwhack) is considered a social pariah to be left behind. As in Stuck in the Middle (of Middle School) (2013), Young demonstrates her apt understanding of preteens, incorporating pertinent themes, such as the search for self-identity, the struggle to accept one’s changing body, first crushes, the betrayal of friends, and the search for new ones. Luminous, witty writing and satirical banter between Chris and Bushwhack move the tale through the school year and offer hope that everyone can survive sixth grade. While not all of the plot is plausible, tweens will connect with Chris’ struggle to find out who she is (and who she wants to be), and they’ll rejoice as she emerges from her cocoon. -- Moore, Melissa (Reviewed 8/1/2016) (Booklist, vol 112, number 22, p66)
  • Gr 5–7—Sixth grader Christine Gouda's last year of elementary school is full of transitions as she begins the early stages of puberty and her friendship with her best friend, Jackie, changes. Christine's mother has often called her Tink (short for Tinker Bell), and her classmates call her Hundred Percent, but Jackie suggests that she adopt a more grown-up nickname, Chris. As her school year begins, Tink contends with having protective parents and three younger siblings, skirting the edges of the popular crowd, and being friends with the weird kids. She finds herself having awkward experiences on Halloween, when she isn't invited to parties, and later in the year receives attention that is more sexual in nature than she wants. Meanwhile, Tink's parents judge Jackie's single but dating mother, and Jackie chooses to befriend the popular crowd because she thinks it will make school easier, not because she likes them. The novel ends with Tink feeling like 100 percent herself as she successfully directs a group lip-syncing performance, pursues the boy she likes, and decides that she wants to be called Christine. Written in third person and filled with the eccentric antics of sixth graders and astute observations about maturity and remaining true to oneself, this title is full of expertly developed characters and a plot that will have readers laughing on one page and empathizing with Tink on the next. Young perfectly captures the emotions of middle schoolers and their evolving friendships and familial relationships. VERDICT A humorous, heartfelt portrayal of a sixth grader learning to stay true to herself; a first purchase for all collections serving tweens.—Liz Anderson, DC Public Library --Liz Anderson (Reviewed 08/01/2016) (School Library Journal, vol 62, issue 8, p98)
  • Believably exploring body issues, crushes, popularity, and friendship, Young (Doodlebug) captures the confused and charming voice of a 12-year-old girl who isn’t sure about much, including what she wants to be called. Sixth-grader Christine “Tink” Gouda’s school year is not going well. She feels too tall, too physically mature, and just too different from the cute, petite girls and crush-worthy boys who make up what Tink refers to as “the circle.” Tink’s best friend Jackie has decided that this year, Tink will be known as “Chris” because it sounds more grown up, but Tink isn’t sure that this new name fits her any better than her old one. Uncertainty fills each page as Tink begins a budding friendship with class clown Matthew “Bushwhack” Alva and watches Jackie try on different personas to fit in. Clever banter and some made-up words, including the “almost rude” “bushwah,” help Romano’s characters jump off the page in a thoughtful and realistic look at what it means to be on the precipice of adolescence. Ages 8–12. Agent: Faye Bender, the Book Group. (Aug.) --Staff (Reviewed 05/30/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 22, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Two white, female best friends enter sixth grade, and their friendship becomes complicated. Tink, 11 going on 12, decides to change her childhood nickname to something more grown-up, and Jackie, her best friend since kindergarten, suggests "Chris"—the abbreviated version of Tink's given name, Christine. It is Tink's wrestling with what it means to be the more adult "Chris" that forms the basis of this extraordinarily perceptive story. Jackie and Tink come from different backgrounds: Jackie is the only child of Bess, a single parent who is currently dating a twice-divorced man with two children, while Tink lives with her parents and three siblings in a middle-class home. Jackie, unsurprisingly, has matured emotionally faster than Tink and is now preoccupied with being part of the in "circle" of the sixth grade, to Tink's confusion and dismay. Young's deliciously fresh, perspicacious narrative is told in third-person from Tink's point of view, punctuated with wry telephone conversations between the girls relayed in scriptlike format. She maintains a spot-on, getting-ready-to-leave-behind-childhood-but-not-yet-adult narrative tone as she relays the complex world of sixth grade—a world of cliques and betrayal and, in Tink's case, the courage to try to sort it all out. Patronization and pandering are completely absent in this original treatment of the theme of belonging. A lovely, lovely tale full of warmth, humor, and intelligence that validates its readership. (Fiction. 10-12)(Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10522846
Cataloging source
NJQ/DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Young, Karen Romano
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Intended audience
790L
Intended audience source
Lexile
Interest level
MG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 5
  • 7
Reading level
5
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Sixth grade (Education)
  • Best friends
  • Friendship
  • Nicknames
  • Families
  • Schools
  • Best friends
  • Friendship
  • Nicknames
  • Family life
  • Best friends
  • Families
  • Friendship
  • Nicknames
  • Sixth grade (Education)
  • JUVENILE FICTION / Girls & Women
  • JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes / Adolescence
  • JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes / Friendship
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
Hundred percent, by Karen Romano Young
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1693051
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
294 pages
Isbn
9781452138909
Lccn
2015047481
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781452138909
  • (OCoLC)935195827
Label
Hundred percent, by Karen Romano Young
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1693051
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
294 pages
Isbn
9781452138909
Lccn
2015047481
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781452138909
  • (OCoLC)935195827

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • North Village BranchBorrow it
      2505 Steck Ave, Austin, TX, 78757, US
      30.362144 -97.7305032
    • St. John BranchBorrow it
      7500 Blessing Ave., Austin, TX, 78752, US
      30.3328231 -97.6937014
    • Willie Mae Kirk BranchBorrow it
      3101 Oak Springs Dr., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.2729762 -97.699748
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