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The Resource How to talk about books you haven't read, Pierre Bayard ; translated from the French by Jeffrey Mehlman

How to talk about books you haven't read, Pierre Bayard ; translated from the French by Jeffrey Mehlman

Label
How to talk about books you haven't read
Title
How to talk about books you haven't read
Statement of responsibility
Pierre Bayard ; translated from the French by Jeffrey Mehlman
Title variation
How to talk about books you havent read
Creator
Contributor
t4btMwydVGM
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Member of
Summary
Argues that it is more important to understand a book's relevance than to be familiar with its details, drawing on examples from key modern works while offering specific advice on how to speak knowledgeably in a variety of social occasions
Tone
Writing style
Award
New York Times Notable Book, 2007
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
226348
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1954-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bayard, Pierre
Dewey number
809
Index
no index present
LC call number
PN45
LC item number
.B34413 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Mehlman, Jeffrey
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Literature
  • Books and reading
Target audience
adult
Label
How to talk about books you haven't read, Pierre Bayard ; translated from the French by Jeffrey Mehlman
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Preface -- Ways of not reading. Books you don't know (in which the reader will see, as demonstrated by a character of Musil's, that reading any particular book is a waste of time compared to keeping our perspective about books overall) -- Books you have skimmed (in which we see, along with Valéry, that it is enough to have skimmed a book to be able to write an article about it, and that with certain books it might even be inappropriate to do otherwise) -- Books you have heard of (in which Umberto Eco shows that it is wholly unnecessary to have held a book in your hand to be able to speak about it in detail, as long as you listen to and read what others say about it) -- Books you have forgotten (in which, along with Montaigne, we raise the question of whether a book you have read and completely forgotten, and which you have even forgotten you have read, is still a book you have read) -- Literary confrontations. Encounters in society (in which Graham Greene describes a nightmarish situation where the hero finds himself facing an auditorium full of admirers impatiently waiting for him to speak about books that he hasn't read) -- Encounters with professors (in which we confirm, along with the Tiv tribe of western Africa, that it is wholly unnecessary to have opened a book in order to deliver an enlightened opinion on it, even if you displease the specialists in the process) -- Encounters with the writer (in which Pierre Siniac demonstrates that it may be important to watch what you say in the presence of a writer, especially when he himself hasn't read the book whose author he is) -- Encounters with someone you love (in which we see, along with Bill Murray and his groundhog, that the ideal way to seduce someone by speaking about books he or she loves without having read them yourself would be to bring time to a halt) -- Ways of behaving. Not being ashamed (in which it is confirmed, with regard to the novels of David Lodge, that the first condition for speaking about a book you haven't read is not to be ashamed) -- Imposing your ideas (in which Balzac proves that one key to imposing your point of view on a book is to remember that the book is not a fixed object, and that even tying it up with string will not be sufficient to stop its motion) -- Inventing books (in which, reading Sōseki, we follow the advice of a cat and an artist in gold-rimmed spectacles, who each, in different fields of activity, proclaim the necessity of invention) -- Speaking about yourself (in which we conclude, along with Oscar Wilde, that the appropriate time span for reading a book is ten minutes, after which you risk forgetting that the encounter is primarily a pretext for writing your autobiography) -- Epilogue
Control code
653959
Dimensions
21 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
xix, 185 pages
Isbn
9781596914698
Lccn
2007027178
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781596914698
  • (OCoLC)154677642
Label
How to talk about books you haven't read, Pierre Bayard ; translated from the French by Jeffrey Mehlman
Link
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Preface -- Ways of not reading. Books you don't know (in which the reader will see, as demonstrated by a character of Musil's, that reading any particular book is a waste of time compared to keeping our perspective about books overall) -- Books you have skimmed (in which we see, along with Valéry, that it is enough to have skimmed a book to be able to write an article about it, and that with certain books it might even be inappropriate to do otherwise) -- Books you have heard of (in which Umberto Eco shows that it is wholly unnecessary to have held a book in your hand to be able to speak about it in detail, as long as you listen to and read what others say about it) -- Books you have forgotten (in which, along with Montaigne, we raise the question of whether a book you have read and completely forgotten, and which you have even forgotten you have read, is still a book you have read) -- Literary confrontations. Encounters in society (in which Graham Greene describes a nightmarish situation where the hero finds himself facing an auditorium full of admirers impatiently waiting for him to speak about books that he hasn't read) -- Encounters with professors (in which we confirm, along with the Tiv tribe of western Africa, that it is wholly unnecessary to have opened a book in order to deliver an enlightened opinion on it, even if you displease the specialists in the process) -- Encounters with the writer (in which Pierre Siniac demonstrates that it may be important to watch what you say in the presence of a writer, especially when he himself hasn't read the book whose author he is) -- Encounters with someone you love (in which we see, along with Bill Murray and his groundhog, that the ideal way to seduce someone by speaking about books he or she loves without having read them yourself would be to bring time to a halt) -- Ways of behaving. Not being ashamed (in which it is confirmed, with regard to the novels of David Lodge, that the first condition for speaking about a book you haven't read is not to be ashamed) -- Imposing your ideas (in which Balzac proves that one key to imposing your point of view on a book is to remember that the book is not a fixed object, and that even tying it up with string will not be sufficient to stop its motion) -- Inventing books (in which, reading Sōseki, we follow the advice of a cat and an artist in gold-rimmed spectacles, who each, in different fields of activity, proclaim the necessity of invention) -- Speaking about yourself (in which we conclude, along with Oscar Wilde, that the appropriate time span for reading a book is ten minutes, after which you risk forgetting that the encounter is primarily a pretext for writing your autobiography) -- Epilogue
Control code
653959
Dimensions
21 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
xix, 185 pages
Isbn
9781596914698
Lccn
2007027178
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781596914698
  • (OCoLC)154677642

Library Locations

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      30.271302100000 -97.746016800000
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