Coverart for item
The Resource Hitler's American model : the United States and the making of Nazi race law, James Q. Whitman

Hitler's American model : the United States and the making of Nazi race law, James Q. Whitman

Label
Hitler's American model : the United States and the making of Nazi race law
Title
Hitler's American model
Title remainder
the United States and the making of Nazi race law
Statement of responsibility
James Q. Whitman
Title variation
Hitlers American model
Title variation remainder
the United States and the making of Nazi race law
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Nazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the United States. Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis? The unsettling answer is yes. In Hitler's American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime. Contrary to those who have insisted that there was no meaningful connection between American and German racial repression, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies. As Whitman shows, the Nuremberg Laws were crafted in an atmosphere of considerable attention to the precedents American race laws had to offer. German praise for American practices, already found in Hitler's Mein Kampf, was continuous throughout the early 1930s, and the most radical Nazi lawyers were eager advocates of the use of American models. But while Jim Crow segregation was one aspect of American law that appealed to Nazi radicals, it was not the most consequential one. Rather, both American citizenship and antimiscegenation laws proved directly relevant to the two principal Nuremberg Laws--the Citizenship Law and the Blood Law. Whitman looks at the ultimate, ugly irony that when Nazis rejected American practices, it was sometimes not because they found them too enlightened, but too harsh
Tone
Writing style
Review
Mr. Hitler, meet Justice Holmes.Anyone pondering the results of the recent presidential election will detect the existence of at least two Americas. So did the Nazis. As Yale Law School professor Whitman (The Legacy of Roman Law in the German Romantic Era, 2016, etc.) observes, the Third Reich readily found plenty of precedents for their complex system of race-based law in American legal history, but they were also puzzled by "the strength of the liberal countercurrent in a country with so much openly and unapologetically sanctioned racism." By Whitman's account, the Nazis were sometimes even less heavy-handed on the legal front than the architects of Jim Crow—and, he writes, it must be remembered that racist laws spread far beyond the South. Nazi jurists even found some American laws too harsh, such as the "one-drop" rule of defining whether one were "Negro." As his argument builds, the author capably defends the assertion that the U.S. was not just a racist power throughout much of its history, but the pre-eminent racist power in the world, one that built elaborate classification schemes in the service of denying minorities and colonized persons full civil rights. Granted that the Germans were more thorough in their application: Whitman observes that whereas Germany sought to impose state machinery on race laws in order to avoid turning legal matters over to the mob, "the United States by contrast remained faithful to lynch justice." Whitman is careful to avoid the minefields of cause and effect: there has been only one real Hitler, after all, and only one Holocaust of the technocratic sort that he set in motion. Still, the author is clear that we should be alarmed and chastened by the fact that the Nazis found so much to emulate in American jurisprudence. "The image of America as seen through Nazi eyes in the early 1930s is not the image we cherish," he writes, "but it is hardly unrecognizable." A small book, but powerful all out of proportion to its size in exposing a shameful history.(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2017)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10556590
Cataloging source
BTCTA
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1957-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Whitman, James Q.
Dewey number
342.4308
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Hitler, Adolf
  • Hitler, Adolf
  • Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
  • Jews
  • Race defilement (Nuremberg Laws of 1935)
  • Race discrimination
  • Citizenship
  • National socialism
  • Antisemitism
  • Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • Segregation
  • Race discrimination
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • Antisemitism
  • Citizenship
  • Jews
  • National socialism
  • Political and social views
  • Race defilement (Nuremberg Laws of 1935)
  • Race discrimination
  • Race discrimination
  • Segregation
  • Germany
  • Southern States
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the United States and the making of Nazi race law
Label
Hitler's American model : the United States and the making of Nazi race law, James Q. Whitman
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-200) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1738808
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
viii, 208 pages
Isbn
9780691172422
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780691172422
  • (OCoLC)958799651
Label
Hitler's American model : the United States and the making of Nazi race law, James Q. Whitman
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-200) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1738808
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
viii, 208 pages
Isbn
9780691172422
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780691172422
  • (OCoLC)958799651

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