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The Resource Hippie food : how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat, Jonathan Kauffman

Hippie food : how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat, Jonathan Kauffman

Label
Hippie food : how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat
Title
Hippie food
Title remainder
how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat
Statement of responsibility
Jonathan Kauffman
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"An enlightening narrative history - an entertaining fusion of Tom Wolfe and Michael Pollan - that traces the colorful origins of once unconventional foods and the diverse fringe movements, charismatic gurus, and counterculture elements that brought them to the mainstream and created a distinctly American cuisine. Food writer Jonathan Kauffman journeys back more than half a century - to the 1960s and 1970s -to tell the story of how a coterie of unusual men and women embraced an alternative lifestyle that would ultimately change how modern Americans eat. Impeccably researched, Hippie Food chronicles how the longhairs, revolutionaries, and back-to-the-landers rejected the square establishment of President Richard Nixon's America and turned to a more idealistic and wholesome communal way of life and food. From the mystical rock-and-roll cult known as the Source Family and its legendary vegetarian restaurant in Hollywood to the Diggers' brown bread in the Summer of Love to the rise of the co-op and the origins of the organic food craze, Kauffman reveals how today's quotidian whole-foods staples - including sprouts, tofu, yogurt, brown rice, and whole-grain bread - were introduced and eventually became part of our diets. From coast to coast, through Oregon, Texas, Tennessee, Minnesota, Michigan, Massachusetts, and Vermont, Kauffman tracks hippie food's journey from niche oddity to a cuisine that hit every corner of this country. A slick mix of gonzo playfulness, evocative detail, skillful pacing, and elegant writing, Hippie Food is a lively, engaging, and informative read that deepens our understanding of our culture and our lives today" --
Storyline
Tone
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ In this informative, briskly paced first book, James Beard Award–winning food writer Kauffman details how the concept of health food “evolved in the kitchens of young baby boomers” during the late 1960s counterculture and then in the post-Vietnam age. “Counterculture adherents,” he writes, “turned their efforts away from protest and created institutions, businesses, and cookbooks that brought the food movement to a much broader audience.” Kauffman explains that many of the staples of what is considered today to be a healthy diet—whole-grain bread, low-fat yogurt, organic or pesticide-free fruits and vegetables—had once been associated with fringe movements and have always been available to consumers. He interviews dozens of influential people within the healthy food movement, including the owners of the Aware Inn on the Sunset Strip, one of the earliest health food restaurants in the late 1950s; the editors of Zen Macrobiotics, which popularized the use of brown rice; and Frances Moore Lappé, author of Diet for a Small Planet, which introduced soybeans and tofu to American tables. Kauffman is equally thorough in tracing how these early innovators inspired the food co-ops and whole food stores that exist today, as well as how, during the 1980s and 1990s, mainstream supermarkets across the country added natural food sections to sell what was dismissed as “hippie food” in the 1960s. This is an outstanding food and cultural history. Agent: Nicole Tourtelot, DeFiore and Co. (Nov.) --Staff (Reviewed 10/16/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 42, p)
  • A gastronomic study of the gradual integration of organic food choices into public consumption.San Francisco Chronicle James Beard Award-winning food journalist Kauffman, who worked as a line cook, gives overdue credit to an organic agricultural movement whose popularity spread like wildfire in the 1970s. He digs deeply into the evolution of the hippie counterculture and how particular foods became staples and how they were included on dinner tables across the world. Raised in the 1970s in an "ultraliberal" Mennonite community, the author writes that his family's diet changed forever with the incorporation of the "earthy, fresh, and none too complex" foods featured in a 1976 copy of home economist Doris Janzen Longacre's More-With-Less Cookbook. This ideal entails stripping cuisine "back to its preindustrial roots," without pesticides, packaging, additives, or processing and devoid of meat. Kauffman tackles this subject journalistically, with interviews and commentary from the chefs and food co-op employees who became part of a larger movement to change the direction of the global diet while remaining mindful of its ecological footprint. He shows how formerly "fringe" foods like alfalfa sprouts, tofu, granola, carob, brown rice, and whole-wheat breads were popularized by the Southern California health-food and vitamin scene in the 1960s, as well as the "exotic" macrobiotic and whole food diets that proliferated in places like the Haight-Ashbury district in San Francisco. Moving forward, the author further analyzes the ways these naturally sourced foods developed into a distinctive cuisine touting both eco-friendly and mind-body benefits, and he documents the nationwide natural food revolution through the voices of organic farmers, homesteaders, and innovative vegetarian cooks. In an intelligently written narrative refreshingly free of personal admonitions or detractions, Kauffman comprehensively presents the history and the momentum of the organic food revolution while foraging for the keys to its increasing desirability and crossover appeal. An astute, highly informative food exposé that educates without bias, leaving the culinary decision-making to readers.(Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 2017)
Assigning source
From Amazon
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10616392
Cataloging source
CDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kauffman, Jonathan
Dewey number
394.1/20973
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Food habits
  • Natural foods
  • Natural foods industry
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat
Label
Hippie food : how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat, Jonathan Kauffman
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical reference (pages 293-332) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1019909301
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
344 pages
Isbn
9780062437303
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1019909301
Label
Hippie food : how back-to-the-landers, longhairs, and revolutionaries changed the way we eat, Jonathan Kauffman
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical reference (pages 293-332) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1019909301
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
344 pages
Isbn
9780062437303
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1019909301

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