Coverart for item
The Resource Hands up, don't shoot : why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America, Jennifer E. Cobbina

Hands up, don't shoot : why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America, Jennifer E. Cobbina

Label
Hands up, don't shoot : why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America
Title
Hands up, don't shoot
Title remainder
why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America
Statement of responsibility
Jennifer E. Cobbina
Title variation
  • Hands up, do not shoot
  • Why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America
Title variation remainder
why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Following the high-profile deaths of eighteen-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and twenty-five-year-old Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, both cities erupted in protest over the unjustified homicides of unarmed black males at the hands of police officers. These local tragedies--and the protests surrounding them--assumed national significance, igniting fierce debate about the fairness and efficacy of the American criminal justice system. Yet, outside the gaze of mainstream attention, how do local residents and protesters in Ferguson and Baltimore understand their own experiences with race, place, and policing? In Hands Up, Don't Shoot, Jennifer Cobbina draws on in-depth interviews with nearly two hundred residents of Ferguson and Baltimore, conducted within two months of the deaths of Brown and Gray. She examines how protesters in both cities understood their experiences with the police, how those experiences influenced their perceptions of policing, what galvanized Black Lives Matter as a social movement, and how policing tactics during demonstrations influenced subsequent mobilization decisions among protesters. Ultimately, she humanizes people's deep and abiding anger, underscoring how a movement emerged to denounce both racial biases by police and the broader economic and social system that has stacked the deck against young black civilians
Storyline
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Why did thousands take to the streets to protest the 2014 police killings of Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, and Freddy Gray in Baltimore? Cobbina (criminal justice; Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis) gives voice to the protesters, using nearly 200 in-depth interviews to detail and document attitudes and actions. The author embeds her interview data with research on race and place, along with scholarship on social movements, reaching beyond Missouri and Maryland to demonstrate that the killings were hardly outliers but, rather, examples of deep contemporary and historical forces of America's racialized social control. Beyond unpacking how 21st-century policing in America reflects a systemic culture of repression rooted in slavery and segregation, Cobbina's narrative, complete with two appendixes on research methods, engages police tactics within the context of community perceptions to address what needs to be done to break structural systems of oppression and create alternative visions for safety that treat the underlying issues that criminalize people. VERDICT Pointing the way to future activism against repressive policing, Cobbina's instructive details and enlightening insights will draw in scholars and general readers concerned with ending police killings of black people with impunity. --Thomas J. Davis (Reviewed 07/01/2019) (Library Journal, vol 144, issue 6, p81)
  • An academic study of the police killings of black citizens as "examples of racial hostility, racial bias [and] legalized racial subordination." Cobbina (Criminal Justice/Michigan State Univ.) builds her narrative from a mixture of her own observations, interviews with experts, and data gathered through carefully designed research. Throughout, the author emphasizes high-profile deaths caused by law enforcement personnel in Baltimore and suburban St. Louis. Cobbina, a black woman who worried about being the victim of police force during her research, focuses mostly on the police killings of black males, but she also looks at the use of deadly force against black women and men and women of other races. Beginning with an expansive history of racial inequality in America, the author posits that such racism has often led to excessive force used disproportionately against blacks by police. After summarizing the historical context, Cobbina explains how racism, as well as the unique aspects of a specific city, resulted in the Baltimore death of Freddie Gray and the Ferguson, Missouri, death of Michael Brown. The author devotes a chapter to an examination of whether black police officers are more or less likely than white officers to employ deadly force against black males. She concludes that the hiring of additional black police officers often leads to negligible positive impact because it is an overly simplified solution to a deeply complex problem involving poverty, lack of hope for meaningful employment, and other structural factors rarely solved by local governments. In the second part of the book, the author shifts focus from the use of force to protests by citizens in Baltimore and St. Louis. She tries to discern why some individuals join protests despite the risks of police force, why many of those protestors quickly drop active resistance while others persist, and why a portion of despairing citizens never become actively involved. For an academic monograph, the author mostly eschews scholarly jargon while also not relying exclusively on anecdotal accounts. Though not groundbreaking, a useful reference on a topic that requires continued examination. (Kirkus Reviews, June 1, 2019)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10801375
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cobbina, Jennifer
Dewey number
363.2/32
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Police brutality
  • Police brutality
  • African American men
  • Discrimination in criminal justice administration
  • Police-community relations
  • Protest movements
  • United States
  • Discrimination in criminal justice administration
  • Police brutality
  • Police-community relations
  • Protest movements
  • Race relations
  • Maryland
  • Missouri
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America
Label
Hands up, don't shoot : why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America, Jennifer E. Cobbina
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction
  • Race & policing: the more things change, the more they remain the same
  • "Guilty until proven innocent": life under suspicion
  • "It's a blue thing": race and black police officers
  • "We stand united": why protesters marched
  • "I will be out here every day strong!" : repressive policing and future activism
  • Public disorder
  • Conclusion
Control code
on1055567632
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
viii, 235 pages
Isbn
9781479874415
Isbn Type
(pbk)
Lccn
2018044999
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
40029305873
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1055567632
Label
Hands up, don't shoot : why the protests in Ferguson and Baltimore matter, and how they changed America, Jennifer E. Cobbina
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction
  • Race & policing: the more things change, the more they remain the same
  • "Guilty until proven innocent": life under suspicion
  • "It's a blue thing": race and black police officers
  • "We stand united": why protesters marched
  • "I will be out here every day strong!" : repressive policing and future activism
  • Public disorder
  • Conclusion
Control code
on1055567632
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
viii, 235 pages
Isbn
9781479874415
Isbn Type
(pbk)
Lccn
2018044999
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
40029305873
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1055567632

Library Locations

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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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