Coverart for item
The Resource God's crucible : Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215, David Levering Lewis

God's crucible : Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215, David Levering Lewis

Label
God's crucible : Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215
Title
God's crucible
Title remainder
Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215
Statement of responsibility
David Levering Lewis
Title variation
Gods crucible
Title variation remainder
Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ This superb portrayal by NYU history professor Lewis of the fraught half-millennium during which Islam and Christianity uneasily coexisted on the continent just beginning to be known as Europe displays the formidable scholarship and magisterial ability to synthesize vast quantities of material that won him Pulitzer Prizes for both volumes of W.E.B. Du Bois. In characteristically elegant prose, Lewis shows Islam arising in the power vacuum left by the death throes of the empires of newly Christianized Rome and Persian Iran, then sweeping out of the Middle East as a fighting religion, with jihad inspiring cultural pride in hitherto marginalized Arab tribes. After Charles Martel’s victory at the Battle of Poitiers in 732 sent the Muslim invaders back south of the Pyrenees, the Umayyad dynasty consolidated its rule in al-Andalus (Muslim Spain), forging a religiously tolerant, intellectually sophisticated, socially diverse and economically dynamic culture whose achievements would eventually seed the Renaissance. Meanwhile, the virtually powerless Roman popes joined forces with ambitious Frankish leaders, from Pippin the Short to Charlemagne, to create the template for feudal Europe: a “religiously intolerant, intellectually impoverished, socially calcified, and economically primitive” society.” The collapse of the Umayyad dynasty and the rise of local leaders who embraced Muslim fundamentalism as a means to power destroyed the vitality of al-Andalus, paving the way for the Crusades and the Christian reconquista of Spain. Lewis clear-sightedly lays out the strengths and weaknesses of both worlds, though his sympathies are clearly with cosmopolitan doctor/philosophers like Ibn Rushd and Musa ibn Maymun (better known in the West as Averroës and Maimonides), who represented “cultural eclecticism and creedal forbearance,” sadly out of place in the increasingly fanatical 12th century. 8 pages of color illus., 4 maps. (Jan.) --Staff (Reviewed October 15, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 41, p52)
  • With an eye to modern headlines, Pulitzer-Prize winner Lewis (W.E.B. Du Bois ) writes a cautionary tale of two civilizations that, rather than coexist, seemed bent on mutual destruction. He begins with a description of the political struggles between the Romans, later the Greco-Romans, and the Persians, a conflict that continued even after the forces of Islam conquered the Persians. Lewis traces both the rise of Islam and the West's recovery from the fall of Rome, explaining, for example, the internal power struggles of both East and West, and the differences between Shiite and Sunni. Using references perhaps chosen as familiar to U.S. readers, Lewis illustrates Islam's role in the evolution of European culture in the Middle Ages. The majority of the book deals with the period up to 960 C.E., with the last 40 pages discussing the 11th and 12th centuries. Lewis's convoluted writing style in this work, and his excessive use of anachronistic, extra-regional examples, such as Sherman's march through Georgia, make this book hard to recommend enthusiastically to scholars. Recommended for public libraries and some undergraduate libraries.—Robert Harbison, Western Kentucky Univ. Lib., Bowling Green --Robert Harbison (Reviewed November 1, 2007) (Library Journal, vol 132, issue 18, p84)
  • Crowded yet sprightly account of Islam's definitive shaping of the world map during the so-called Dark Ages.While the Roman Empire was crumbling, writes Pulitzer Prize–winner Lewis (History/New York Univ.; W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century 1919–1963, 2000, etc.), Muhammad was taking up the sword for Allah. "The Arab jihad swept aside kingdoms and empires," he notes, achieving a tremendous revolution in power and culture in both Asia and fledgling Europe. Indeed, Lewis demonstrates beautifully, if the Franks under Charles Martel hadn't turned back the more enlightened Muslim invaders at Poitiers in 732, the continent might have been spared becoming "an economically retarded, balkanized, fratricidal Europe that, in defining itself in opposition to Islam, made virtues out of religious persecution, cultural particularism, and hereditary aristocracy." This thoughtful overview sheds welcome light on an increasingly relevant period of history. Avoiding the Eurocentric route, Lewis first traces the demise of the two superpowers, Graeco-Latin Rome and Persian Iran, grown exhausted through waging perpetual war on each other by the sixth century. Simultaneously, the self-proclaimed prophet Muhammad emerged from the proud, dominant Quraysh tribe of bustling Mecca to lead his people out of ignorance. He conquered Mecca with an army of believers before his death in 632, but it was his ardent followers who assembled the vital texts that would become the Qur'an and built a formidable military machine, sweeping over Syria, Persia, Egypt and the Maghreb. They crossed into Visigothic Iberia in 711, establishing a highly learned, tolerant culture that endured for 500 years. Lewis portrays a staggering number of personalities among the successive caliphs, as well as the righteous leaders of the marauding Lombards, Franks and Carolingians such as Clovis and Charlemagne.A work of clear-eyed scholarship—and occasionally challenging vocabulary. (Kirkus Reviews, October 15, 2007)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
230185
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1936-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Lewis, David L.
Dewey number
940.1
Index
index present
LC call number
D117
LC item number
.L48 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Civilization, Medieval
  • Europe
  • Europe
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215
Label
God's crucible : Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215, David Levering Lewis
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
654070
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxv, 473 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9780393064728
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2007038000
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color), maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780393064728
  • (OCoLC)172521784
Label
God's crucible : Islam and the making of Europe, 570 to 1215, David Levering Lewis
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
654070
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxv, 473 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9780393064728
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2007038000
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color), maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780393064728
  • (OCoLC)172521784

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Spicewood Springs BranchBorrow it
      8637 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78759, US
      30.4337083 -97.7730809
Processing Feedback ...