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The Resource God is not great : how religion poisons everything, Christopher Hitchens

God is not great : how religion poisons everything, Christopher Hitchens

Label
God is not great : how religion poisons everything
Title
God is not great
Title remainder
how religion poisons everything
Statement of responsibility
Christopher Hitchens
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"A case against religion and a description of the ways in which religion is man-made"--Provided by the publisher
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Hitchens, one of our great political pugilists, delivers the best of the recent rash of atheist manifestos. The same contrarian spirit that makes him delightful reading as a political commentator, even (or especially) when he's completely wrong, makes him an entertaining huckster prosecutor once he has God placed in the dock. And can he turn a phrase!: "monotheistic religion is a plagiarism of a plagiarism of a hearsay of a hearsay, of an illusion of an illusion, extending all the way back to a fabrication of a few nonevents." Hitchens's one-liners bear the marks of considerable sparring practice with believers. Yet few believers will recognize themselves as Hitchens associates all of them for all time with the worst of history's theocratic and inquisitional moments. All the same, this is salutary reading as a means of culling believers' weaker arguments: that faith offers comfort (false comfort is none at all), or has provided a historical hedge against fascism (it mostly hasn't), or that "Eastern" religions are better (nope). The book's real strength is Hitchens's on-the-ground glimpses of religion's worst face in various war zones and isolated despotic regimes. But its weakness is its almost fanatical insistence that religion poisons "everything," which tips over into barely disguised misanthropy. (May 30) --Staff (Reviewed March 12, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 11, p52)
  • In November 2006, Wired magazine published an article called "The Church of the Non-Believers," which profiled the new atheism movement along with its proponents: the formidable Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, and Daniel Dennett. Missing from this erudite lineup was the learned Hitchens, journalist and contributing editor to Vanity Fair . Fortunately, Hitchens disseminates his views here, cataloging the major arguments against religion, which he deems a pernicious force. First, he writes, faith misrepresents the origin of the cosmos as well as that of humanity; second, it fosters servility, solipsism, and sexual repression; and, third, it is based on wishful thinking. Hitchens spares no targets in this manifesto, criticizing both Western and Eastern faiths. Ultimately, he calls for a "New Enlightenment" and the pursuit of "unfettered scientific inquiry." This provocative, challenging, and passionate work—a religious believer's and apologist's nightmare—is recommended without reservation for public and academic libraries.—C. Brian Smith, Arlington Heights Memorial Lib., IL --C. Brian Smith (Reviewed April 15, 2007) (Library Journal, vol 132, issue 7, p96)
  • Put an -ism onto it, and whatever it is, noted polemicist and contrarian Hitchens (Love, Poverty, and War, 2005, etc.) is likely to decimate it. So he reveals in this pleasingly intemperate assault on organized religion.Hitchens opens by recalling an epistemological crisis. Why, if God was great, did he need to be praised "so incessantly for doing what came to him naturally"? If Jesus could heal the blind, why didn't he do away with blindness? Such doubts arrive to all proper questioners; sometimes they turn into C.S. Lewis or Malcolm Muggeridge, sometimes they turn into committed atheists. Hitchens, forthrightly in the latter camp, offers "four irreducible objections to religious faith" at the outset, namely that religion misrepresents human origins and those of the universe at large; that owing to this, religion combines "the maximum of servility with the maximum of solipsism"; that religion suppresses sexuality to a dangerous degree; and that religion is a species of wishful-thinking. And the author adds another twist of the knife: Religion makes people crazy, violent and ill-behaved. Just ask Salman Rushdie—or Giordano Bruno. Hitchens, a brave grappler quite obviously unafraid of giving offense, cheerfully takes on all comers, from mullahs to commissars to Mahatma Gandhi—and a noted televangelist who once challenged him with a thought experiment in which, in a foreign land, Hitchens is approached by a large group of men. Wouldn't he feel more comfortable, the televangelist asked, to learn that they had just left a religious service? Citing personal experiences in cities only beginning with B—Belfast, Beirut, Bombay, Belgrade, Bethlehem and Baghdad—Hitchens answers emphatically in the negative. And all that's before taking on Joseph Smith, and Mohammed, and . . .It's clear from page to page that Hitchens, a columnist for Vanity Fair, is having a grand time twitting the folks in the white collars and purple dresses, in the turbans and beehives. Like-minded readers will enjoy his arguments, too. (Kirkus Reviews, March 1, 2007)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
189749
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1949-2011
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hitchens, Christopher
Dewey number
200
Index
index present
LC call number
BL2775.3
LC item number
.H58 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Religion
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
how religion poisons everything
Label
God is not great : how religion poisons everything, Christopher Hitchens
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
631357
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
307 pages
Isbn
9780446579803
Lccn
2006023039
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780446579803
  • (OCoLC)70630426
Label
God is not great : how religion poisons everything, Christopher Hitchens
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
631357
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
307 pages
Isbn
9780446579803
Lccn
2006023039
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780446579803
  • (OCoLC)70630426

Library Locations

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      30.4223444 -97.7161692
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