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The Resource Free the beaches : the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline, Andrew W. Kahrl

Free the beaches : the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline, Andrew W. Kahrl

Label
Free the beaches : the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline
Title
Free the beaches
Title remainder
the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline
Statement of responsibility
Andrew W. Kahrl
Title variation
Free the beaches
Title variation remainder
the story of Ned Coll and the battle for Americas most exclusive shoreline
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"The story of our separate and unequal America in the making, and one man's fight against it--During the long, hot summers of the late 1960s and 1970s, one man began a campaign to open some of America's most exclusive beaches to minorities and the urban poor. That man was anti-poverty activist and one-time presidential candidate Ned Coll of Connecticut, a state that permitted public access to a mere seven miles of its 253-mile shoreline. Nearly all of the state's coast was held privately, for the most part by white, wealthy residents. This book is the first to tell the story of the controversial protester who gathered a band of determined African American mothers and children and challenged the racist, exclusionary tactics of homeowners in a state synonymous with liberalism. Coll's legacy of remarkable successes--and failures--illuminates how our nation's fragile coasts have not only become more exclusive in subsequent decades but also have suffered greater environmental destruction and erosion as a result of that private ownership."--Publisher's website
Writing style
Review
  • Following The Land Was Ours, a 2016 monograph of the white takeover of black beaches in the South, Kahrl (history, Univ. of Virginia) completes his history of 20th-century racism as viewed through the lenses of beach access, private ownership, and public policy. This engrossing account captures the experience of Irish Catholic activist Ned Coll and a group of black families who challenged the de facto segregation of beach access policies in order to ensure that children from Connecticut's inner cities would be permitted to enjoy New England beaches. Kahrl illuminates the experience of local families who rode buses to the Connecticut shoreline in defiance of town ordinances restricting their rights to what were ostensibly public beaches, and the vocal and legal challenges by wealthy white residents to their presence. At moments inspiring and at others infuriating, Kahrl's work clearly demonstrates how seemingly benign policies of land use and home rule in the North were just as effective as Jim Crow laws in the South in maintaining segregation. VERDICT An important addition to the literature on 20th-century racism in the North. Scholars and activists alike will find much to anger and impassion them in Kahrl's work. --Bart Everts (Reviewed 03/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 4, p96)
  • How a 1960s-era campaign to open beaches to the public exposed Connecticut's deeply entrenched racism. In 1964, inspired by John Kennedy's call for "a citizenry guided by the maxim of self-sacrifice for the public good," 23-year-old Ned Coll quit his job at an insurance company in Hartford, Connecticut, and started a local project that he called the Revitalization Corps. In a well-documented—and dispiriting—history of prejudice and inequality, Kahrl (History and African American Studies/Univ. of Virginia; The Land Was Ours: African American Beaches from Jim Crow to the Sunbelt South, 2012) focuses on Coll's career as a brash, indefatigable anti-poverty activist to reveal endemic bigotry in a state renowned for its liberal values. Connecticut's shore—the state's Gold Coast—was dotted with wealthy communities whose residents fiercely protected private use of the beaches. Physical barriers, exorbitant access fees for nonresidents, and bans on street parking near beaches were a few of the strategies deployed to keep Connecticut's poor off the white sands. "In a state where extreme wealth and equally extreme poverty resided in close proximity," writes the author, "beach access restrictions complemented, reinforced, and helped to naturalize the barriers dividing thriving suburbs from dying cities." Along with education and housing reform, Coll focused much energy on beach access, filling buses with children from poor cities and transporting them to private beaches, devising a program like New York's Fresh Air Fund to give children a chance to live with white families for a portion of the summer, and mounting repeated lawsuits. The push for beach access spawned a nationwide movement: between 1964 and 1974, Kahrl discovered, "federal and state courts decided at least twenty-six cases involving disputes over public rights on beaches" in which white communities argued vociferously for their entitlement. Despite many successes, Coll never took on the challenge of "dismantling the structures" and institutions that perpetuate racial inequality, and he became increasingly "unhinged, reckless, and counterproductive" as he lost the public's respect. An unsparing exposé of white supremacy among Northern elites. (Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10625556
Cataloging source
YDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1978-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kahrl, Andrew W.
Dewey number
333.3089/960730746
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Coll, Ned
  • African Americans
  • Beaches
  • HISTORY
  • HISTORY
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • African Americans
  • Beaches
  • Connecticut
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline
Label
Free the beaches : the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline, Andrew W. Kahrl
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 307-347) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction -- New England's sand curtain -- What am I doing here? -- Rats cause riots -- Let's share summer -- Gut liberalism -- Who the hell invited that guy? -- Freedom of beach -- Saving the shore -- Go home, Ned -- Welcome to Greenwich! -- Epilogue: Nature bats last
Control code
on1002669822
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
viii, 364 pages
Isbn
9780300215144
Lccn
2017952545
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)1002669822
Label
Free the beaches : the story of Ned Coll and the battle for America's most exclusive shoreline, Andrew W. Kahrl
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 307-347) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction -- New England's sand curtain -- What am I doing here? -- Rats cause riots -- Let's share summer -- Gut liberalism -- Who the hell invited that guy? -- Freedom of beach -- Saving the shore -- Go home, Ned -- Welcome to Greenwich! -- Epilogue: Nature bats last
Control code
on1002669822
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
viii, 364 pages
Isbn
9780300215144
Lccn
2017952545
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)1002669822

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