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The Resource Frank & Al : FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party, Terry Golway

Frank & Al : FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party, Terry Golway

Label
Frank & Al : FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party
Title
Frank & Al
Title remainder
FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party
Statement of responsibility
Terry Golway
Title variation
Frank and Al
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"The inspiring story of an unlikely political partnership--between a to-the-manor-born Protestant and a Lower East Side Catholic--that transformed the Democratic Party and led to the New Deal In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Democratic Party was bitterly split between its urban machines--representing Catholics and Jews, ironworkers and seamstresses, from the tenements of the northeast and Midwest--and its populists and patricians, rooted in the soil and the Scriptures, enforcers of cultural, political, and religious norms. The chasm between the two factions seemed unbridgeable. But just before the Roaring Twenties, Al Smith, a proud son of the Tammany Hall political machine, and Franklin Roosevelt, a country squire, formed an unlikely alliance that transformed the Democratic Party. Smith and FDR dominated politics in the most powerful state in the union for a quarter century, and in 1932 they ran against each other for the Democratic presidential nomination, setting off one of the great feuds in American history. The relationship between Smith and Roosevelt is one of the most dramatic untold stories of early 20th Century American politics. It was Roosevelt who said once that everything he sought to do in the New Deal had been done in New York under Al Smith when he was governor in the 1920s. It was Smith who persuaded a reluctant Roosevelt to run for governor in 1928, setting the stage for FDR's dramatic comeback after contracting polio in 1921. They took their party, and American politics, out of the 19th Century and created a place in civic life for the New America of the 20th Century"--
Writing style
Review
  • Golway, a senior editor at Politico and a former member of the editorial board of the New York Times, explores the relationship and political alliance between future president Franklin Roosevelt, the upper-class patrician, and powerful New York politician Al Smith, child of the Tammany Hall machine, which he credits with providing the political base that enabled the New Deal. The two men met in 1911, when Roosevelt joined Smith in the New York legislature, and continued crossing paths for the next 30 years, most often as allies but sometimes as bitter competitors—both vied for the 1932 Democratic presidential nomination. Golway highlights Roosevelt’s support of Smith’s first run for governor and 1928 campaign for president (likely lost because of widespread prejudice against Smith’s Catholicism). Smith’s career is more interesting—he served three terms as governor of New York, during which he engineered numerous progressive policies around such issues as worker protections—and it provides the opportunity to delve into New York machine politics. Smith is portrayed as rough around the edges, with an eighth-grade education, “workingman’s bellow,” and loud suits, but also as a likable, admirable politician. The Roosevelt-Smith relationship is a well-chosen prism through which to view the foundational political alliance of the Democratic Party. Agent: John Wright, John W. Wright Literary. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed 08/13/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 33, p)
  • Historian Golway (history, Kean Univ.; Machine Made) presents a fuller story of the sometimes supportive, at other times antagonistic, relationship at the state and national levels between politicians Al Smith and Franklin Roosevelt. Relying largely on correspondence found at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, supplemented by other archival and secondary sources, Golway traces how these two New York governors and presidential candidates shaped the Democratic party, both when they collaborated throughout the 1920s and when they split after 1932. This focused work offers cross-cutting accounts of the progress of these men—one a grade school drop out but practiced amateur actor, the other a privileged Harvard grad. With Roosevelt the subject of numerous books, the influence of the lesser-studied Smith is arguably more compelling and enlightening. Most of Smith's advisors eventually rallied for Roosevelt, while a few, notably Belle Moskowitz and Robert Moses, emphatically did not. Curiously, the author maintains that Eleanor Roosevelt campaigned for presidential candidate Smith in 1928, not her husband, that year's gubernatorial candidate. VERDICT Golway's clear, at times humorous, prose will entice all readers interested in this political rivalry. The author's diligent research will impress historical practitioners. --Frederick J. Augustyn Jr. (Reviewed 07/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 12, p81)
  • Two giants of 20th-century American politics receive an insightful dual biography. Franklin Roosevelt (1882-1945) is no stranger to historians, but Politico senior editor Golway (Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics, 2014, etc.) wisely wraps matters up after he became president in 1933. Until then, fellow New Yorker Al Smith (1873-1944) was better known. Born on the Lower East Side, Smith struggled financially, but he impressed the local Tammany boss, who sent him to Albany in 1904 as assemblyman. Though initially frustrated by bureaucracy, he hid "his frustration behind a mask of good cheer" and became a leading reformer. Wealthy and bored by practicing law, Roosevelt fell in love with politics. Winning a state Senate seat in 1910, he concentrated on national affairs, supporting Woodrow Wilson in 1912 and earning appointment as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Golway dates the "alliance" to the 1920 Democratic presidential convention, when Smith, then the governor of New York, asked Roosevelt to second his nomination. Quiescent for years after his 1921 paralysis, Roosevelt supported Smith for governor in 1922, 1924, and 1926. Running for president in 1928, Smith convinced Roosevelt to run for governor. Roosevelt's victory immediately made him a contender for 1932. It also ended their alliance. Crushed by his defeat, Smith felt ignored by the new governor. Detesting Roosevelt's New Deal, he supported Alfred Landon in 1936 and Wendell Willkie in 1940. Historians, Golway included, agree that Smith was the more forthright, unwilling to sacrifice ideals for political gain. Thus, both men hated Prohibition. Roosevelt gets credit for repeal in 1933 when support had weakened, but he waffled when it would lose votes during the 1920s. Smith never wavered, but it cost him. A fine account of FDR's rise to power combined with a cradle-to-grave biography of the man who made it possible. (Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2018)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10692261
Cataloging source
LBSOR/DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1955-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Golway, Terry
Dewey number
324.273609/041
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • plates
Index
index present
LC call number
JK2316
LC item number
.G67 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Democratic Party (U.S.)
  • Democratic Party (U.S.)
  • Roosevelt, Franklin D.
  • Smith, Alfred Emanuel
  • Roosevelt, Franklin D.
  • Smith, Alfred Emanuel
  • Democratic Party (U.S.)
  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Political
  • HISTORY / United States / 20th Century
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Process / Political Parties
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party
Label
Frank & Al : FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party, Terry Golway
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
River families -- Fathers, mothers, and sons -- Young men in a hurry -- Albany -- Leadership -- Fire -- Changing times -- Bridge building -- Defeat -- Resurrection -- The darned old liquor question -- The happy warrior -- Uncivil war -- The challenge of a new America -- Confronting old America -- Frank or Al -- Frank vs. Al -- Peace
Control code
on1016972532
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
322 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781250089649
Lccn
2018010895
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1016972532
Label
Frank & Al : FDR, Al Smith, and the unlikely alliance that created the modern Democratic Party, Terry Golway
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
River families -- Fathers, mothers, and sons -- Young men in a hurry -- Albany -- Leadership -- Fire -- Changing times -- Bridge building -- Defeat -- Resurrection -- The darned old liquor question -- The happy warrior -- Uncivil war -- The challenge of a new America -- Confronting old America -- Frank or Al -- Frank vs. Al -- Peace
Control code
on1016972532
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
322 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781250089649
Lccn
2018010895
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1016972532

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