The Resource Florette, Anna Walker

Florette, Anna Walker

Label
Florette
Title
Florette
Statement of responsibility
Anna Walker
Creator
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
When Mae's family moves from the country to the city, she is sad to leave behind her beloved backyard garden but before long, she finds a way to start a new garden
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • Children's Book Council of Australia: Notable Australian Children's Book, 2018.
  • New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book, 2018.
  • Wilderness Society Australia Environment Award for Children's Literature, 2018.
Review
  • Preschool-Grade 3 New to the city, Mae misses her old garden with its apple trees, daffodils, and butterflies. She tries to recreate them with chalk drawings in the empty courtyard outside her apartment building, but rain washes the pictures away. Upstairs, she draws plants on moving boxes, but they disappear after her parents unpack. Entranced by a store window displaying a verdant forest of plants, Mae plucks a green sprout from the sidewalk, plants it in a jar, and takes it to the courtyard. When neighborhood children bring out their potted plants to share, Mae gains a garden and friends as well. Captivating watercolor paintings will draw readers to this appealing picture book. Early illustrations emphasize Mae’s small stature and her isolation within city scenes. But even when she stands in the rainy courtyard, looking at fading traces of her chalk drawings, other children are watching her through their windows. This quietly told and beautifully illustrated story will resonate with other children who have been uprooted, but hope to flourish in a new home. -- Phelan, Carolyn (Reviewed 12/1/2017) (Booklist, vol 114, number 7, p64)
  • PreS-Gr 1—Moving is difficult for most people, but leaving a beloved garden to inhabit an urban apartment is quite an upheaval for this young protagonist: subdued neutral hues comprise the palette at this point, a situation Mae tries to rectify by drawing a chalk garden on the adjoining plaza and on the boxes piled up in her room. Alas, rain and her father's unpacking ruin her creations. Even a family outing to park swings seems doomed when Mae observes stones instead of grass, but spying an "apple-tree bird," the inquisitive girl discovers a luscious, blossoming paradise—enclosed in glass. Although "Florette" is closed, a tiny sprout is growing from a crack in the building. Potting it, she takes it to her plaza; when the view pulls back, this too has become a verdant oasis, with vines hanging from balconies and a diverse group of children playing among the flowerpots. The narration is restrained and tightly constructed, allowing the watercolor compositions to contrast the pale city—punctuated with the smallest spots of pigment—with the many shades and shapes of greenery in the botanical garden; that page turn is spectacular. VERDICT A worthy addition to the canon of books depicting young gardeners transforming spaces and lives, such as Sarah Stewart's The Gardener and Peter Brown's The Curious Garden.—Wendy Lukehart, District of Columbia Public Library --Wendy Lukehart (Reviewed 12/01/2017) (School Library Journal, vol 63, issue 12, p93)
  • Mae is lonely after her family moves from the countryside into the city, and she misses growing things: “There was no room among the crowded buildings for apple trees and daffodils.” Soon Mae and her mother find a park—and then they stumble on a magnificent florist’s window dense with lush, tropical greenery. (“Florette” is the name of the store; readers may expect it to take a more central role, but Mae and her mother never return.) A small plant Mae finds nearby provides her with the start of a garden of her own—a garden that grows, and that draws, little by little, many new friends. Walker’s carefully drafted watercolors capture the charm of Parisian streets (her biography attributes the story’s inspiration to a Paris vacation). Stately, classic facades tower over the doll-like figures of Mae and the other children. On one level, it’s a story that reminds readers that getting used to new places takes time. But it’s the artwork that commands attention, and the way the florist’s window offers Mae inspiration for the garden she creates. Ages 4–7. Agent: Stephen Barr, Writers House. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed 12/04/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 49, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Mae desperately misses her garden after moving to the city, with its tall, crowded buildings and narrow streets; her new urban environment offers no "winding paths and leafy hiding spots" or butterfly chases "in the wavy grass." Light-skinned with bobbed chestnut hair tucked behind her ears, Mae tries to cheer herself up, which will deeply impress young readers who couldn't imagine being transplanted (and perhaps seem even more admirable to those who have!). She covers a cobblestone square with chalk drawings of caterpillars, leaves, dragonflies, dandelions, bees, and grass; she covers towering cardboard moving boxes with apple trees, lily of the valley, birds, daisies, and ladybugs. But the rain washes away her pictures, and her dad totes away the boxes. While the city has its own appeal, its elegant buildings stretching skyward and its charming storefronts cheery, Mae's melancholy bleeds through, coloring everything. Wan watercolors offer some soft pinks, mellow reds, and mossy greens, but overcast slate blues and grays dominate. Verdant, dazzling endpapers at the book's very beginning (dappled leaves covering the spread completely, dotted with little wildflowers and the faces of a few woodland creatures) make Mae's changed circumstances painfully clear. When she stumbles upon Florette, a greenhouse plant shop crawling with vines, leaves, cactus needles, and blossoms, Mae finally sees she can bloom where she's been planted. Lessons in both gumption and the sacred nature of urban green spaces. (Picture book. 4-8) (Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2017)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10559956
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Walker, Anna
Dewey number
[E]
Index
no index present
Intended audience
  • AD590L
  • Decoding demand: 74 (high)
  • Semantic demand: 72 (high)
  • Syntactic demand: 77 (high)
  • Structure demand: 82 (very high)
Intended audience source
  • Lexile
  • Lexile
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 1
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Moving, Household
  • City and town life
  • Nature stories
  • Moving, Household
  • City and town life
  • Nature stories
  • JUVENILE FICTION
  • JUVENILE FICTION
  • JUVENILE FICTION
Target audience
primary
Label
Florette, Anna Walker
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
1911998
Extent
1 volume
Isbn
9780544876835
Lccn
2016049419
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780544876835
  • (OCoLC)986991506
Label
Florette, Anna Walker
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
1911998
Extent
1 volume
Isbn
9780544876835
Lccn
2016049419
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780544876835
  • (OCoLC)986991506

Library Locations

    • Carver BranchBorrow it
      1161 Angelina St., Austin, TX, 78702, US
      30.2695584 -97.7240278
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      30.2713021 -97.7460168
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      30.3529975 -97.7551561
    • Southeast BranchBorrow it
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      30.1876256 -97.7419319
    • St. John BranchBorrow it
      7500 Blessing Ave., Austin, TX, 78752, US
      30.3328231 -97.6937014
    • Twin Oaks BranchBorrow it
      1800 S. Fifth St., Austin, TX, 78704, US
      30.2486884 -97.76239749999999
    • University Hills BranchBorrow it
      4701 Loyola Ln., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3093017 -97.6664785
    • Willie Mae Kirk BranchBorrow it
      3101 Oak Springs Dr., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.2729762 -97.699748
    • Windsor Park BranchBorrow it
      5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723, US
      30.3116523 -97.6902298
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