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The Resource Finding wonders : three girls who changed science, Jeannine Atkins

Finding wonders : three girls who changed science, Jeannine Atkins

Label
Finding wonders : three girls who changed science
Title
Finding wonders
Title remainder
three girls who changed science
Statement of responsibility
Jeannine Atkins
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"A biographical novel in verse of three different girls in three different time periods who grew up to become groundbreaking scientists"--
Storyline
Writing style
Character
Award
Best STEM Books, 2018
Review
  • Grades 4-7 /* Starred Review */ From the author of Borrowed Names (2010), this three-part novel in verse vividly imagines the lives of three girls who grew up to become famous for their achievements in science. “Mud, Moths, and Mystery” opens in Germany in 1660 with Maria Merian as a girl, closely observing insect metamorphosis. Pursuing her interest in nature throughout her life, she even traveled to South America to observe wildlife. “Secrets in Stones” tells of young Mary Anning, who in the early 1800s began collecting fossils from cliffs near her home in Lyme Regis, England. Despite poverty and limited education, her significant discoveries and observations contributed to paleontology at a pivotal time. “Mapmaker’s Daughter” begins in 1831 with Maria Mitchell stargazing through her father’s telescope on Nantucket. Later, she discovered a comet and became a college astronomy professor. Atkins has a knack for turning a phrase, such as “Certainty is like a pillow / she learned to live without,” or “Coughs scrape the air, as if Pa breathes through a grater.” Science is woven through the narratives, but within the fabric of the characters’ daily lives and family struggles. While the Mary Anning narrative is the most haunting, each of these three perceptive portrayals is original and memorable. -- Phelan, Carolyn (Reviewed 5/15/2016) (Booklist, vol 112, number 18, p58)
  • Gr 4–8—A collection of fictionalized stories in verse about three real women whose innovations influenced modern science. Maria Merian (1647–1717) was captivated by the metamorphosis of the caterpillar. Despite common superstitions about shape-shifting magic, Merian secretly collected and observed first silkworms, then caterpillars, to document the science beneath the mystery. She grew up to create incredible paintings of insects, including butterflies and other wonders of the natural world. Mary Anning (1799–1847) shared her father's curiosity about fossils entombed in the rocks of their New England home. Her findings were painstakingly excavated by chiseling away each layer of rock. Maria Mitchell (1818–89), who tirelessly watched the heavens for both consistency and change, discovered a new comet and became one of the first women to be accepted into the American Academy of Arts and Science. Atkins skillfully conveys the importance of these women's scientific contributions to the world, while also imagining the complexities of their lives as daughters, wives, and sisters during times when female scientists were marginalized or ignored. The verse is effective—evocative and beautiful. VERDICT Highly recommended for fans of poetry about the natural world and the lives of real people.—Patricia Feriano, Montgomery County Public Schools, MD --Patricia Feriano (Reviewed 06/01/2016) (School Library Journal, vol 62, issue 6, p90)
  • Writing in free verse, Atkins (Borrowed Names) reaches back into the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries to the girlhoods of Maria Merian, naturalist and scientific illustrator; Mary Anning, fossil hunter; and astronomer Maria Mitchell, all curious girls whose childhood passions led to groundbreaking work. Each grew up in a deeply bonded family and had a strongly supportive father; each fought quietly and determinedly against the obstacles of being a girl with unusual interests. In a closing note, Atkins explains that while she carefully documented the women’s adult achievements, writing in verse gave her the liberty to fictionalize details of their younger years. The result is a sensory depiction of daily life in earlier centuries—“the cottage smells of laundry soap and herbal tonics”—and a credible development of three sympathetic characters. Evocative similes abound (“a silkworm silently spins/ a silk cocoon around itself,/ like a dancer twirling/ or a baker frosting a tall cake”), building an increasing ambiance of “finding wonder” in the world. In addition to the author’s note, a selected bibliography and Atkins’s thoughts on other science biographies are provided. Ages 10–up. Agent: Sara Crowe, Harvey Klinger. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed 06/27/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 26, p)
  • The verse biographies of three pioneering women who made their marks on science.Atkins here introduces young readers to three women who bucked convention and distinguished themselves in scientific disciplines at times in history when females were expected to engage in domestic pursuits. German-born Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717), who defied the then-accepted notion of spontaneous generation and discovered how caterpillars become butterflies, is still considered one of the foremost entomologists of her day; Brit Mary Anning (1799-1847) discovered the first ichthyosaur and was the first person known to make a living selling fossils; and Maria Mitchell (1818-89) discovered a comet in 1847 and went on to become the first woman in the United States to work as an astronomer. Though they were born in different centuries and lands, Atkins adroitly employs spare yet lyric poems to imagine the similar development of these path-breaking white women, whom she imagines taking the leads of their fathers in cultivating their curiosity and having the courage to believe that: "Discoveries are made / by those willing to say, Once we were wrong, / and ask question after question." Atkins takes the license verse grants to "fill in what disappeared" from what remains of her subjects' childhoods, creating captivating fictionalized portraits. Inspirational and informative, Atkins shows how pursuing one's passion for science, math, or any field considered nontraditional is worth the risk. (author's note, bibliographic essay, bibliography) (Verse historical fiction. 10-14)(Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 2016)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10527518
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1953-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Atkins, Jeannine
Dewey number
[Fic]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 8
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Merian, Maria Sibylla
  • Anning, Mary
  • Mitchell, Maria
  • Naturalists
  • Paleontologists
  • Astronomers
  • Merian, Maria Sibylla
  • Anning, Mary
  • Mitchell, Maria
  • Naturalists
  • Paleontologists
  • Astronomers
  • Women scientists
  • Scientists
  • Sex role
Target audience
pre adolescent
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
three girls who changed science
Label
Finding wonders : three girls who changed science, Jeannine Atkins
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 193-195)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Mud, moths, and mystery: Maria Sibylla Merian -- Secrets in stones: Mary Anning -- Many stars, one comet: Maria Mitchell
Control code
ocn944954647
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
195 pages
Isbn
9781481465656
Lccn
2015036450
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)944954647
Label
Finding wonders : three girls who changed science, Jeannine Atkins
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 193-195)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Mud, moths, and mystery: Maria Sibylla Merian -- Secrets in stones: Mary Anning -- Many stars, one comet: Maria Mitchell
Control code
ocn944954647
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
195 pages
Isbn
9781481465656
Lccn
2015036450
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)944954647

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