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The Resource Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler : Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement : 1937-1939, Adrian Phillips

Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler : Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement : 1937-1939, Adrian Phillips

Label
Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler : Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement : 1937-1939
Title
Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler
Title remainder
Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement : 1937-1939
Statement of responsibility
Adrian Phillips
Title variation
Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler
Title variation remainder
Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britains plight of appeasement, 1937-1939
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"A radically new view of the British policy of appeasement in the late 1930s, identifying the individuals responsible for a variety of miscalculations and moral surrender that made World War II inevitable. Appeasement failed in all its goals. The kindest thing that can be said of it is that postponed World War II by one year. Its real effect was to convince Hitler and Mussolini that Britain was weak and afraid of confrontation, encouraging them to ever-greater acts of aggression. The turning point of the Czech crisis in September 1938 came when Wilson saw Hitler on his own and left him convinced that Britain was bluffing and would not go to war to defend Czechoslovakia. The dismemberment of Czechoslovakia that followed was not the end of appeasement. The Anglo-German Declaration was Chamberlain's personal vanity project but both Chamberlain and Wilson believed that it genuinely brought "peace for our time." Chamberlain and Wilson blindly pursued bilateral friendship between Britain and the dictators and ferociously resisted alternative policies such as working with France, the Soviet Union, or the U.S. to face down the dictators. They resisted all-out rearmament which would have put the economy on a war footing. These were all the policies advocated by Winston Churchill, the most dangerous opponent of appeasement. Churchill was a hated figure for Chamberlain and Wilson. They could not accept Churchill's perception that that Hitler was the implacable enemy of peace and Britain, and opposing him became an end in itself for them. Churchill and Wilson had been bitter adversaries since early in their careers because of an incident that Fighting Churchill, Appeasing Hitler reveals publicly for the first time. Chamberlain had a fraught relationship with Churchill long before appeasement became an issue. Neither Chamberlain nor Wilson had any experience of day-to-day practical diplomacy. Both thought that the dictators would apply the same standards of rationality and clarity to the policies of Italy and Germany that applied in Britain. They could not grasp that Fascist demagogues operated in an entirely different way to democratic politicians. The catastrophe of the Chamberlain/Wilson appeasement policy offers a vital lesson in how blind conviction in one policy as the only alternative can be fatally damaging. 8 pages of B&W photographs."--Provided by publisher
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Phillips (The King Who Had to Go) delivers a comprehensive examination of British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s efforts to negotiate peace with Nazi Germany. Phillips’s account reveals the extent to which the prime minister banked his appeasement efforts on such ill-fated plans as partially restoring German claims in colonial Africa in exchange for Adolf Hitler’s agreement to rejoin the League of Nations and take a less aggressive posture toward Czechoslovakia and other Eastern European countries. Phillips deepens the common understanding of such well-known events as Chamberlain’s September 1938 Munich visit by focusing on the role played by Sir Horace Wilson, a senior civil servant with no foreign policy background who served as the prime minister’s aide and confidante in the years leading up to the German invasion of Poland and England’s war declaration. Chamberlain apologists are likely to rethink their stance in light of evidence, presented here, that the prime minister ignored his military advisers’ opinions when it suited him, and that he and Wilson influenced the British media to suppress criticism of the Nazi regime. This somber, exhaustive account will persuade WWII history buffs that, in trying to prevent the war, Chamberlain and Wilson “made it almost inevitable.” (Dec.) --Staff (Reviewed 10/21/2019) (Publishers Weekly, vol 266, issue 42, p)
  • A complex tale of the political rivalry that underlay a key episode in 20th-century world events. Although the efforts of Neville Chamberlain to preserve the peace in Europe by accommodating Hitler's demands for territory have long been viewed as an act of moral cowardice, British historian Phillips (The King Who Had To Go: Edward VIII, Mrs. Simpson and the Hidden Politics of the Abdication Crisis, 2017, etc.) notes that it had a certain logic, since going to war with Germany might put the entire British Empire at risk. That empire, he writes, "had been built in the days when France was its only challenger, but now Germany, Japan, and the United States had the resources to put its standing to the severest of tests." The behind-the-scenes architect of appeasement was Chamberlain's adviser Horace Wilson; arrayed against them was Winston Churchill, who insisted on a vigorous policy of containment. Chamberlain was willing to go to unusual measures to placate Hitler, including giving in to his demands that African colonies seized by Britain after World War I be returned to Germany—at the risk, the British understood, that the colonized peoples might become ardent Nazis and new enemies. (In any event, notes the author, those peoples were never consulted about whether they wanted to be ruled by a foreign power in the first place.) Chamberlain and Wilson calculated wrongly that the economic costs of rearmament would help keep Hitler in check, and they also took the curious position that Churchill and his allies in government proved a greater danger to the peace than the fascist dictators then in power. In the end, it became clear that Britain would not be able to avoid war, and Churchill accordingly rose to serve as prime minister in Chamberlain's stead. Churchill, though vain and capable of exercising questionable judgment, was ordinarily a hard fighter who bore no grudges, but Phillips writes that he seems to have taken pleasure in stripping Wilson of his positions and making his life otherwise difficult after Chamberlain's fall. A fresh interpretation of the question of appeasement that will interest students of 20th-century history. (Kirkus Reviews, October 15, 2019)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10829529
Cataloging source
FMG
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Phillips, Adrian
Dewey number
941.084
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
DA47.2
LC item number
.P45 2019
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Great Britain
  • Germany
  • Great Britain
  • Great Britain
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Chamberlain, Neville
  • Churchill, Winston
  • Wilson, Horace
  • Hitler, Adolf
  • HISTORY / Europe / Great Britain / 20th Century
  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Political
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement, 1937-1939
Label
Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler : Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement : 1937-1939, Adrian Phillips
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 413-433) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1127650565
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First Pegasus Books hardcover edition.
Extent
xxxi, 448 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781643132211
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1127650565
Label
Fighting Churchill, appeasing Hitler : Neville Chamberlain, Sir Horace Wilson, & Britain's plight of appeasement : 1937-1939, Adrian Phillips
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 413-433) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
on1127650565
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First Pegasus Books hardcover edition.
Extent
xxxi, 448 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781643132211
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1127650565

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