Coverart for item
The Resource Field notes from a catastrophe : man, nature, and climate change, Elizabeth Kolbert

Field notes from a catastrophe : man, nature, and climate change, Elizabeth Kolbert

Label
Field notes from a catastrophe : man, nature, and climate change
Title
Field notes from a catastrophe
Title remainder
man, nature, and climate change
Statement of responsibility
Elizabeth Kolbert
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
New Yorker writer Kolbert tackles the controversial subject of global warming. Americans have been warned since the late 1970s that the buildup of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere threatens to melt the polar ice sheets and irreversibly change our climate. With little done since then to alter this dangerous course, now is the moment to salvage our future. By the end of the century, the world will likely be hotter than it's been in the last two million years, and the sweeping consequences of this change will determine the future of life on earth for generations to come. Kolbert approaches this monumental problem from every angle. She travels to the Arctic, interviews researchers and environmentalists, explains the science and the studies, draws frightening parallels to lost ancient civilizations, unpacks the politics, and presents the personal tales of those who are being affected most--the people who make their homes near the poles and are watching their worlds disappear.--From publisher description
Writing style
Award
  • ALA Notable Book, 2007.
  • New York Times Notable Book, 2006
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ On the burgeoning shelf of cautionary but occasionally alarmist books warning about the consequences of dramatic climate change, Kolbert's calmly persuasive reporting stands out for its sobering clarity. Expanding on a three-part series for the New Yorker , Kolbert (The Prophet of Love ) lets facts rather than polemics tell the story: in essence, it's that Earth is now nearly as warm as it has been at any time in the last 420,000 years and is on the precipice of an unprecedented "climate regime, one with which modern humans have had no prior experience." An inexorable increase in the world's average temperature means that butterflies, which typically restrict themselves to well-defined climate zones, are now flitting where they've never been found before; that nearly every major glacier in the world is melting rapidly; and that the prescient Dutch are already preparing to let rising oceans reclaim some of their land. In her most pointed chapter, Kolbert chides the U.S. for refusing to sign on to the Kyoto Accord. In her most upbeat chapter, Kolbert singles out Burlington, Vt., for its impressive energy-saving campaign, which ought to be a model for the rest of the nation—just as this unbiased overview is a model for writing about an urgent environmental crisis. (Mar. 14) --Staff (Reviewed December 5, 2005) (Publishers Weekly, vol 252, issue 48, p39)
  • New Yorker staff writer Kolbert (The Prophet of Love, 2004) reports from the frontlines of global warming.Based on a three-part series that appeared in the magazine, this slim volume conveys through telling detail the changes already being wrought by human-induced global warming. For most Americans, this issue is not yet "close to home," Kolbert writes; the early effects are found nearer the poles. In the Alaskan village of Shishmaref, early spring thaws and storm surges may force residents to relocate from their centuries-old home. The same fate threatens permafrost expert Vladimir Romanovsky; huge sinkholes are opening up practically on his doorstep. Kolbert's excursion to Swiss Camp, a research station in Greenland, ends with her finding a large puddle in her tent. Later she bids a fond farewell to one of the rapidly shrinking glaciers in Iceland. The island nation has had glaciers for the past two million years; one day they may all be gone. When the ice melts and the oceans warm, sea levels go up. Determined to keep their homes, the Dutch are well underway with plans to accommodate the rising waters, including buying out low-lying farms to hold projected floodwater and building floating houses. Vignettes also describe instances of warming-induced migration (butterflies moving their ranges northward) and disappearance (the golden toad, which had nowhere to go from its mountaintop). Although lighter on science than most books covering climate change, Kolbert's narrative does provide enough history to orient readers. A visit to David Rind at the GISS Climate Impacts Group reveals that, ironically, while flooding may occur on some parts of the planet, the continental U.S. may face severe drought. Obligatory chapters on politics and the Kyoto Protocol are followed by stories of grassroots efforts by local governments—but will they be enough? Good storytelling humanizes an often abstract subject. (Kirkus Reviews, February 1, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
163032
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kolbert, Elizabeth
Dewey number
363.738/74
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
QC981.8.G56
LC item number
K655 2006
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Global warming
  • Global temperature changes
  • Global environmental change
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
man, nature, and climate change
Label
Field notes from a catastrophe : man, nature, and climate change, Elizabeth Kolbert
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip062/2005030972.html
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 195-203) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Shishmaref, Alaska -- A warmer sky -- Under the glacier -- The butterfly and the toad -- The curse of Akkad -- Floating houses -- Business as usual -- The day after Kyoto -- Burlington, Vermont -- Man in the Anthropocene
Control code
592820
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
210 pages
Isbn
9781596911253
Lccn
2005030972
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9781596911253
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781596911253
  • (OCoLC)62134789
Label
Field notes from a catastrophe : man, nature, and climate change, Elizabeth Kolbert
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip062/2005030972.html
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 195-203) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Shishmaref, Alaska -- A warmer sky -- Under the glacier -- The butterfly and the toad -- The curse of Akkad -- Floating houses -- Business as usual -- The day after Kyoto -- Burlington, Vermont -- Man in the Anthropocene
Control code
592820
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First U.S. edition.
Extent
210 pages
Isbn
9781596911253
Lccn
2005030972
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9781596911253
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9781596911253
  • (OCoLC)62134789

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      710 W. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78701, US
      30.2713021 -97.7460168
    • Spicewood Springs BranchBorrow it
      8637 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin, TX, 78759, US
      30.4337083 -97.7730809
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